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Full text of "Bulletin of Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina"

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Archives 

J- & B/uford Library 



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Jf . A * T s '3te University 
Greensboro, N. C. 274] I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofagricu19701971 






THE BULLETIN 



Volume 62 Number 2 April 1971 



A&T 

STATE 

UNIVERSITY 




Greensboro 



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VOL. 62, NO. 2 APRIL, 1971 

THE BULLETIN — Published seven times each year by North Carolina Agricultural 
and Technical State University, 312 North Dudley Street, Greensboro, North 
Carolina 274 1 1 . 

Second Class Postage Paid at Greensboro, North Carolina 



if: o. JtfST u . . 




THE BULLETIN 



of 



NORTH CAROLINA 



AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 



Greensboro 



(CO-EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION 



SEVENTY- FOURTH ANNUAL 

CATALOGUE 1970-71 

WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1971-72 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



CONTENTS 

Page 

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR vi 

UNIVERSITY BOARD OF TRUSTEES viii 

NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION . viii 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION . . viii 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION ix 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 312 

RELATED SERVICES STAFF 326 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical Statement 3 

Location 4 

The Physical Plant 4 

Institutional Memberships 5 

Ferdinand D. Bluford Library 6 

The Audio-Visual Center 6 

Computer Science Center 6 

Financial Information 7 

Student Personnel Services 13 

Guidance Services 13 

Health Services 13 

Housing 14 

Food Services '. . . 15 

Placement Services 15 

Veterans Affairs and Services 15 

Student Organizations and Activities 16 

Student Conduct 16 

GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION AND 

REGULATIONS „ 19 

Admission Procedures 19 

Admission Requirements 20 

Residence Status for Tuition Payment 21 

Classification of Students 23 

Student Load and Scholastic Standards 24 

THE PROGRAM OF TEACHER EDUCATION 189 

ACADEMIC OFFERINGS 

The School of Agriculture 31 

Department of Agricultural Education 33 

Department of Animal Science 37 

Department of Home Economics 44 

Department of Plant Science 61 

The School of Arts and Sciences 70 

Division of Humanities 72 

Department of Art 73 



Page 

Department of English 80 

Department of Foreign Languages 89 

Department of Music 96 

Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts 105 

Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 117 

Department of Biology 118 

Department of Chemistry 127 

Department of Mathematics 135 

Department of Physics 144 

Division of Social Sciences 154 

Department of Economics 155 

Department of History 165 

Department of Political Science 175 

Department of Sociology and Social Service 181 

The School of Education 189 

Department of Education 192 

Department of Psychology and Guidance 205 

Department of Health, Physical Education and 

Recreation 212 

Department of Adult Education and 

Community Services 224 

Division of Industrial Education and Technology 227 

Department of Industrial Education 227 

Department of Industrial Technology 237 

The School of Engineering 249 

Department of Architectural Engineering 250 

Department of Electrical Engineering 256 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 259 

The School of Nursing 273 

The School of Administrative and Management Science . 279 

Department of Accounting 280 

Department of Business Administration 282 

Department of Business Education 284 

The Graduate School 299 

Departments of Military Science and Aerospace Studies . 305 

GRADUATES 335 

PRIZES AND AWARDS 350 

ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES IN NORTH CAROLINA . 352 

ENROLLMENT BY STATES 353 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 354 

INDEX 355 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 1971-1972 



FALL SEMESTER 1971 

August 18 — Wednesday 

August 19-21 — Thursday-Saturday 

August 23 — Monday 

August 24-25 — Tuesday-Wednesday 

August 25 — Wednesday 
August 26-28 — Thursday-Saturday 
August 30 — Monday 
September 6 — Monday 
September 7 — Tuesday 

September 21 — Tuesday 

October 25-30 — Monday-Saturday 

November 2 — Tuesday 

November 24 — Wednesday 

November 29 — Monday 
December 13 — Monday 
December 14 — Tuesday 
December 18 — Saturday 
December 18 — Saturday 



President's Staff Conference 
Faculty-Staff Conference 

Freshmen and transfer students 
report 

Orientation and advisement of 

freshmen and transfer students 
Upperclassmen report 
Registration 
Classes begin 
Labor Day Holiday 
Classes resume, Last day to add a 

course 
Fall Semester Assembly 
Mid-semester evaluation 
Last day to drop a course without 

grade evaluation 
Thanksgiving holidays begin at 

1:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:00 a.m. 
Reading Day 
Final examinations begin 
Final examinations end 
Fall semester ends, Christmas 

holidays begin 



SPRING SEMESTER 1972 

January 5 — Wednesday 

January 6-8 — Thursday-Saturday 

January 10 — Monday 

January 17 — Monday 

February 1 — Tuesday 

March 6-11 — Monday-Saturday 

March 14 — Tuesday 

March 30— Thursday 
April 10 — Monday 
May 8 — Monday 
May 9 — Tuesday 
May 13 — Saturday 
May 14 — Sunday 



Freshmen and transfer students re- 
port for orientation 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to add a course 

Spring Semester Assembly 

Mid-semester evaluation 

Last day to drop a course without 
grade evaluation 

Easter holidays begin at 1:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 7:00 a.m. 

Reading Day 

Final examinations begin 

Final examinations end 

Commencement Exercises 





CALENDAR 


FOR 1971 




JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
1011 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 1415 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 






CALENDAR 


FOR 1972 




JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL AND TECHNICAL STATE UNIVERSITY 

GREENSBORO 

John S. Stewart, Chairman Durham, North Carolina 

Charles W. Phillips, Vice Chairman Greensboro, North Carolina 

Howard C. Barn hill Charlotte, North Carolina 

Andrew Best Greenville, North Carolina 

Robert H. Frazier Greensboro, North Carolina 

James A. Graham Raleigh, North Carolina 

Frontis W. Johnston Davidson, North Carolina 

David W. Morehead Greensboro, North Carolina 

L. L. Ray Burlington, North Carolina 

George W. Sockwell Elon College, North Carolina 

Otis Tillman High Point, North Carolina 

W. B. Wicker Greensboro, North Carolina 



NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION 

Governor Robert W. Scott, Chairman 



H. Clifton Blue 
Sammie Chess 
Thorne Gregory 
W. C. Harris, Jr. 
Addison Hewlett, Jr. 
Watts Hill, Jr. 
Mrs. Mary P. Horton 
J. P. Huskins 
Samuel H. Johnson 
J. Russell Kirby 
Clarence E. Leatherman 

Cameron P. West, Director 



J. Paul Lucas 

Isaac H. Miller, Jr. 

John A. Pritchett 

Ralph H. Scott 

Maceo A. Sloan 

John L. Stickley 

Lindsay C. Warren, Jr. 

David J. Whichard II 

E. J. Whitmire 

Mrs. George D. Wilson 



NORTH CAROLINA BOARD OF EDUCATION 

H. Pat Taylor, Lieutenant Governor, Ex-Officio 

Edwin Gill, State Treasurer, Ex-Officio 

Craig Phillips, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Secretary, Ex-Officio 

Dallas Herring, Chairman 

John A. Pritchett, Vice Chairman 



Douglas Aitken 
R. Barton Hayes 
Charles E. Jordan 
Mrs. Eldiweiss Lockey 



William R. Lybrook 

John M. Reynolds 

Mrs. Mildred Stickland 

Harold L. Trigg 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

Lewis C. Dowdy, A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Litt.D. President 

Glenn F. Rankin, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean of Academic Affairs 

John Zeigler, B.S Business Manager 

Jesse E. Marshall, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean of Student Affairs 

Marshall H. Colston, B.S., M.S.W Director of Planning and 

Development 

J. M. Marteena, B.M.E., M.S Dean of Administration 

Howard Robinson, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. Director of Research Administration 
Gloria Scott, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Director of Institutional Studies 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Glenn F. Rankin, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean of Academic Affairs 

Reginald Amory, B.C.E., M.C.E., Ph.D. Dean, School of Engineering 

Arthur F. Jackson, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

S. Joseph Shaw, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Dean, School of Education 

Albert W. SPRUILL, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean, The Graduate School 

B. C. Webb, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Dean, School of Agriculture 

Naomi W. Wynn, B.S., M.A. Dean, School of Nursing 

T. Mahaffey, B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D. Dean, School of Administrative and 

Management Science 

J. Niel Armstrong, B.S., A.M Director of Summer School 

William H. Gamble, B.S. Director of Adinissions, Registration 

and Records 

B. C. Crews, Jr., A.B., M.L.S. Acting Librarian 

Lt. Colonel William Graves, B.S. Professor of Military Science 

Lt. Colonel Robert Thornton, B.S., M.S. Professor of Aerospace 

Studies 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Jesse E. Marshall, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Dean of Student Affairs 

William C. Parker, Jr., B.S., M.S., M.Ed Associate Dean of 

Student Affairs 

Theodore Bunch, B.S., M.D Director of Health Services and 

University Physician 

William Goode, B.S Dean of Men 

Lucille Piggott, B.S., M.Ed Dean of Women 

Ruth GORE, B.S., A.M Director of Counseling and Testing Services 

Vance Gray, B.S., M.B.A Director of Student Financial Aid 

Benny Mayfield, B.S., M.Ed. Assistant to the Dean of Student Affairs 

W. I. Morris, B.S., M.A Director of Placement 

Cleo McCoy, B.A., B.S., B.D Director of Religious Activities 

Albert Smith, B.S., M.S Director of the Memorial Union 



DEVELOPMENT 

Marshall H. Colston, B.S., M.S.W. Director of Planning and 

Development 
Richard Moore, B.S., M.S. Director of Public Information 



OFFICER EMERITUS 

Warmoth T. Gibbs, A.B., Ed.M., LL.D President Emeritus 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



*..</F|w l» 'TPV 




HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

The Agricultural and Technical College was established as the "A. and T. 
College for the Colored Race" by an act of the General Assembly of North 
Carolina ratified March 9, 1891. The act read in part: 

That the leading object of the institution shall be to teach prac- 
tical Agricultural and the Mechanic Arts and such branches of 
learning as relate thereto, not excluding academical and classical 
instruction. 
The College began operation during the school year 1890-91, before the 
passage of the state law creating it. This curious circumstance arose out 
of the fact that the Morrill Act passed by Congress in 1890 earmarked the 
proportionate funds to be allocated in bi-racial school systems to the two 
races. The A. and M. College for the White Race was established by the 
State Legislature in 1889 and was ready to receive its share of funds pro- 
vided by the Morrill Act in the Fall of 1890. Before the college could receive 
these funds, however, it was necessary to make provisions for Colored 
students. Accordingly, the Board of Trustees of the A. and M. College in 
Raleigh was empowered to make temporary arrangements for these 
students. A plan was worked out with Shaw University in Raleigh where 
the College operated as an annex to Shaw University during the years 
1890-1891, 1891-1892, and 1892-1893. 

The law of 1891 also provided that the College would be located in such 
city or town in the State as would make to the Board of Trustees a suitable 
proposition that would serve as an inducement for said location. A group of 
interested citizens in the city of Greensboro donated fourteen acres of land 
for a site and $11,000 to aid in constructing buildings. This amount was 
supplemented by an appropriation of $2,500 from the General Assembly. The 
first building was completed in 1893 and the College opened in Greensboro 
during the fall of that year. 

In 1915 the name of the institution was changed to The Agricultural and 
Technical College of North Carolina by an Act of the State Legislature. 
The scope of the college program has been enlarged to take care of new 
demands. The General Assembly authorized the institution to grant the 
Master of Science degree in education and certain other fields in 1939. The 
first Master's degree was awarded in 1941. The School of Nursing was 
established by an Act of the State Legislature in 1953 and the first class 
was graduated in 1957. 

The General Assembly repealed previous acts describing the purpose of 
the College in 1957, and re-defined its purpose as follows: 

"The primary propose of the College shall be to teach the Agricul- 
tural and Technical Arts and Sciences and such branches of learning 
as related thereto; the training of teachers, supervisors, and admin- 
istrators for the public schools of the State, including the prepara- 
tion of such teachers, supervisors and administrators for the 
Master's degree. Such other programs of a professional or oc- 
cupational nature may be offered as shall be approved by the North 
Carolina Board of Higher Education, consistent with the appro- 
priations made therefor." 
The 1967 General Assembly re-designated the College as a Regional 
University effective July 1, 1967. 

Six presidents have served the institution since it was established. They 
are as follows: Dr. J. O. Crosby, (1892-1896), Dr. James B. Dudley, (1896- 
1925), Dr. F. D. Bluford, (1925-1955), Dr. Warmoth T. Gibbs, (1956-1960), 
Dr. Samuel DeWitt Proctor, (1960-1964), and Dr. Lewis C. Dowdy, who was 
elected president April 10, 1964. 



4 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

LOCATION 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University is a state- 
supported regional university, fully accredited by the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools. A coeducational institution A&T's unique campus 
stands only nine blocks from the heart of metropolitan Greensboro, North 
Carolina — an industrial-educational complex of 142,000 and long noted for 
it friendliness and hospitality. The University's urban location puts major 
shopping areas, theaters, churches and transportation depots within walking 
distance. This location is also an advantage to the many students who obtain 
part-time employment in the city's business district. 

Students at A&T, and those at another university and three colleges take 
full advantage of Greensboro's outstanding cultural climate. The City has 
become known for its libraries, museums, art galleries and university and 
college campuses. Greensboro's central location in the state provides con- 
venient access to other nearby points of interest. 

A wide variety of entertainment and recreation is available on the campus 
and in facilities of the city. The four and one-half million dollar Greensboro 
Memorial Auditorium-Coliseum attracts outstanding athletic, entertainment 
and cultural events. Outstanding among these attractions are the annual 
Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association Basketball Tournament and a 
schedule of Atlantic Coast Conference and professional basketball games. 
The city also fields professional teams in baseball and hockey. The city has 
facilities available for ice skating, bowling, boating and fishing, horseback 
riding, tennis and golf. 

THE PHYSICAL PLANT 

The university campus comprises modern, fire resident buildings, all 
thoroughly maintained for the highest level of efficiency, located on land 
holdings in excess of 181 acres. 

Additional facilities procured in recent years include: The Lutheran 
College Property which contains several buildings and two tracts of land on 
Dudley Street, purchased from the Redevelopment Commission of Greens- 
boro. 

UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 

Dudley Memorial Building (Administration) 

F. D. Bluford Library 

Harrison Auditorium 

Charles Moore Gymnasium 

Coltrane Hall (Headquarters for N. C. Agricultural Extension Service) 

Memorial Union 

The Oaks (President's Residence) 

CLASS ROOM AND LABORATORY BUILDINGS 

Carver Hall School of Agriculture 

Cherry Hall School of Engineering 

Crosby Hall School of Arts and Sciences 

Hodgin Hall School of Education and Arts & Sciences 

Noble Hall School of Nursing 

Price Hall Division of Industrial Education and Technology 

Benbow Hall Home Economics 



General Information 5 

Garrett House Home Economics 

Hines Hall Chemistry 

Sockwell Hall Agricultural Technology 

Ward Hall Dairy Manufacturing 

Reid Greenhouses 
Graham Hall 

Frazier Hall Music-Art 

Price Hall Annex Division of Industrial Education & Technology 

Campbell Hall ROTC Headquarters 

Barnes Hall Biology 

Merrick Hall Business and Mathematics 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

For Women For Men 

Curtis Hall (148) Cooper Hall (400) 

East Dormitory (46) Scott Hall (1010) 

Gibbs Hall (200) Senior Hall (200) 

High Rise Dormitory (East) (194) 
High Rise Dormitory (West) (208) 
Holland Hall (144) 
Morrison Hall (94) 
Vanstory Hall (200) 

Service Buildings 

Murphy Hall Cafeteria 

Brown Hall Cafeteria, Post Office, Student Financial Aid Office 

Sebastian Infirmary 

Power Plant 

Laundry-Dry Cleaning Plant 

Other Facilities 

College Farms — including 600 acres of land and modern farm buildings 
Athletic field — including three practice fields for football, quarter mile track, 
baseball diamond and field house. 

INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIP 

North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University is a fully ac- 
credited member of the SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND 
SCHOOLS, and holds institutional membership in the following associations: 

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

American Association of Colleigate Registrars and Admission Officers 

National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges 

American College Public Relations Association 

American Council on Education 

American Public Welfare Association 

American Library Association 

Association of American Colleges 

Association of Collegiate Deans and Registrars 

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture 

College Language Association 

National Association of Business Teacher Education 



6 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

National Association of College and University Food Service 

National Commission on Accrediting 

National Institutional Teacher Placement Association 

National League for Nursing, Council of Member Agencies, Department 

of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs 
North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities 
North Carolina League for Nursing 
North Carolina Library Association 
Southeastern Library Association 

Graduates of the College are eligible for membership in the American 
Association of University Women. 

The School of Engineering is accredited by the Engineer's Council on 
Professional Development. 

FERDINAND D. BLUFORD LIBRARY 

The F. D. Bluford Library is a modern multi story building. Its current 
holdings include 286,432 volumes and a collection of records, films, filmstrips 
and prints. The library subscribes to 1,176 periodicals, newspapers and 
indexes. It provides open shelves for a selection of reference books, 
bibliographies and bound periodicals. 

The library is open 92 hours per week. 



Monday-Thursday 


8:00 a.m.-12:00 M 


Friday 


8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m 


Saturday 


9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m 


Sunday 


2:00 p.m.-12:00 M 



The Chemistry Library, located in Hines Hall, is under the supervision 
of the F. D. Bluford Library. 

The Clinton Taylor Art Gallery and Teacher Education Materials Center 
are located in the building. 

THE AUDIOVISUAL CENTER 

The Audiovisual Center is a resource pool of materials, services and 
facilities. It purports to assist in the improvement of instruction by pro- 
viding means of facilitating the communication of ideas, attitudes and facts 
in the teaching-learning process. The Center is located on the first floor of 
Bluford Library. The film inspection area, storage area, preview room and 
class laboratory is located on the third floor. The Audiovisual Center pro- 
vides the following services for the campus: 

Circulation of Audiovisual materials 

Information on rental films from other sources 

Projectionists for audiovisual showings 

Projection room with equipment 

Previewing facilities 

Assistance in the selection and preparation of materials 

Production of tape recordings, charts, graphs and overhead projecturals 

COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

The Computer Science Center provides computational facilities for 
students, members of the faculty and other employees on the campus. The 
staff of the Center assists in the preparation of programs, operation of the 



General Information 7 

computer and card-tabulating equipment, and instruction in the use of these 
equipments. It has the responsibility of maintaining- programming systems 
for the Control Data 3300 which serves as consultants to computer users 
conducting research in engineering, mathematics and computer science. 

INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH IN HUMAN RESOURCES 

The University has organized an Institute for Research in Human Re- 
sources. Its broad purpose is to investigate problems that exist for people 
who are culturally, economically, educationally or socially disadvantaged. 
The Institute has been structured to bring together available resources and 
attributes from the University and the larger community for research, 
service and study. The interdisciplinary approach employed by the Institute 
allows social scientists, humanists and the natural scientists to place special 
emphasis upon achieving new approaches and new solutions to many human 
resource problems. 

TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE 

The Transportation Institute draws faculty, staff members and students 
from a number of different departments to create an interdisciplinary unit 
to conduct training and research programs in the field of transportation. 
It also serves as a resource for planners, social scientists, public officials 
and community groups in helping them solve transportation problems. 

In the Training Program, students who wish to take a minor in the field 
of transportation can choose from a coordinated series of courses offered 
by the Departments of Architectural Engineering, Business Education and 
Economics. 

The Research Program covers a wide range of areas from investigating 
needs of the poor to developing a transportation systems model. The pro- 
grams are oriented towards both exploring various problem areas and 
providing students the opportunity to become knowledgeable in transporta- 
tion analysis. 

Neither the Training or Research program is limited to students. Short 
courses, seminars and workshops are open to individuals outside the 
University to provide instruction in transportation. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

STUDENT LOAN FUND 

N. C. A. and T. State University Student Aid Fund was established by 
the Student Council of 1946-194.7 to provide a source of revenue for loans 
to deserving students. This fund is supported by the contributions from 
students, faculty members, and campus organizations. Any regular term 
students, duly registered, is eligible to apply for aid through this fund. 

THE NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

A. and T. State University participates in the National Defense Student 
Loan Program. This program was authorized by Public Law 85-864, the 
National Defense Education Act of 1958. It provides a loan fund from 
which undergraduates and graduate students may borrow on reasonable 



8 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

terms for the purpose of completing their higher education. A student must 
be a citizen of the United States, enrolled as a full-time or half-time under- 
graduate or graduate student in order to be eligible for a loan. Application 
forms and additional information may be obtained from the Financial 
Aid Officer, North Carolina A. & T. State University, Greensboro, North 
Carolina. 

NORTH CAROLINA RURAL REHABILITATION CORPORATION 
STUDENT LOAN PROGRAM 

Loans under this program are available to needy and worthy North 
Carolina farm boys and girls who plan to study agriculture or home eco- 
nomics. The loans bear interest at the rate of four percent per annum. 
Application forms and additional information may be obtained from North 
Carolina Rural Rehabilitation Corporation, Post Office Box 2403, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 

REQUIRED FEES AND CHARGES 



Total semester fees and charges are due and payable in full on or before registration of 
each semester. However, an alternate payment plan listed below is available to BOARDING 
or BOARDING AND LODGING students only. Mailed in payments shall be postmarked not 
later than August 20, 1971 for the Fall Semester and January 20, 1972 for the Spring- 
Semester. Make all remittances payable to A & T State University and address to Cashier's 
Office, North Carolina A & T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411. 

Students 

Students Living On 

Living Off Campus and 

Campus But Taking Meals 

Students Talcing Meals On Campus 

Living Off On Campus (Boarding and 

Campus (Boarding Only Lodging 

(Day Student) Student) Student) 



North Carolina Students: 
Fall and Spring 
Semester Each .... 



$474.75 



$644.25 



Out-of-State Students: 
Fall and Spring 
Semester Each . . 



ALTERNATE PAYMENT PLAN FOR BOARDING OR 



BOARDING AND LODGING STUDENTS ONLY 

Students Living 

Off Campus But 

Taking Meals On 

Campus 

(Boarding Only Student) 



Student Living On 

Campus and Taking 

Meals On Campus 

(Boarding and 
Lodging Student) 



Payment Due Each Registration 

Second Installment 

(Oct. 10, 1971) 



Third Installment 

(Nov. 10, 1971) 

Fourth Installment 
(Dec. 10, 1971) 



Totals $474.75 



N. C. 
Student 


Out-of-State 
Student 


N. C. 
Student 


Out-of-StaU 
Student 


$339.75 


$689.25 


$392.25 


$741.75 


45.00 


45.00 


84.00 


84.00 


45.00 


45.00 


84.00 


84.00 


45.00 


45.00 


84.00 
$644.25 


84.00 


$474.75 


$824.25 


$993.75 



REGULAR SESSION PART-TIME STUDENT FEE RATES 



N. C. Students, Per Semester Hour $ 21.85 

Out-of-State Student, Per Semester Hour 51.00 



General Information 9 

summer school student fee rates 

Tuition (Per Semester Hour) $ 8.40 

Out-of-State Fees (Per Semester Hour) 16.60 

Registration Fees (Per Semester Hour) .60 

Activity Fee (Per Semester Hour) .20 

Book Rental Fee (Per Semester Hour) 1.50 

Health Service Fee (Per Semester Hour) .50 

Student Union Fee (Per Semester Hour) 1.00 

Board Rate ( Per Week with Meal Tickets ) 13.50 

Room Rent with Linen Rental ( Per Week ) 7.00 

RETAIL OF FEES, DEPOSITS AND CHARGES 

Required Fees — Per Year: 

Tuition, N. C. Student $251.00 

Tuition, Out-of-State Student 950.00 

Registration Fees 15.00 

Activity Fees 86.50 

Book Rental Fees 38.00 

Health Service Fee 50.00 

Student Union Fee 44.00 

Reserve for Auxiliary Service Operations 40.00 

Board and Room Rates: 

Board $425.00 

Room Rent 320.00 

Linen Rental 16.00 

Linen Deposit (Refundable) 3.00 

Incidental Fees and Deposits: 

Admission Application Deposit 

(No refund — no credit on account) $ 5.00 

Admission Reservation Deposit 

(No refund — credit applied to account) 15.00 

Ambulance Service 20.00 

Day Student Infirmary Meal Charges .60 

Dormitory Key Deposit ( Refundable) 1.00 

Driver Education Laboratory Fee Per Course 

Regular Session or Summer School 10.00 

Graduation Fees Regalia Renting and Diploma: 

Trades 11.00 

Bachelors 15.00 

Masters 26.00 

I. D. Card Replacement 3.00 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Masters Thesis Binding Fee — Three Copies 20.00 

Practice Teaching Fee (Other than Vocational Agriculture) 35.00 

ROTC Uniform Deposit 10.00 

Engineering Inspection Tour Fee 25.00 

Special Examination Fees Varies $5 to $15 (Average) 10.00 

Transcript of Records (after first one) 1.00 

Activity Book Replacement Fee 4.00 

AUDITORS 

Auditing of courses is open to a qualified person, without credit, upon the payment of all 
regular applicable fees. Currently enrolled full-time students may audit courses without 
additional charge. An auditor is not required to participate in class discussions, prepare 
assignments or take examinations. 

REFUNDS 

Refunds upon official withdrawal of a student from the University will be made less any 
amounts due the University as follows: 

1. Lodging: Days room not occupied at the rate of $1.15 per day from time of official 
withdrawal. (No refund on linen rental.) 

2. Board: Refund computed at the rate of $1.59 per day from the official date of with- 
drawal. 

3. Tuition: Registration, Health, Book Rental, Student Union and Activity Fees, Reserve 
for Auxiliary Service Operations: 

90 percent when withdrawal is within one week of registration date. 
80 percent when withdrawal is within two weeks of registration date. 
75 percent when withdrawal is within three weeks of registration date. 
60 percent when withdrawal is within four weeks of registration day. 
45 percent when withdrawal is within five weeks of registration date. 
35 percent when withdrawal is within six weeks of registration date. 
20 percent when withdrawal is within seven weeks of registration date. 
15 percent when withdrawal is within eight weeks of registration date. 
None when withdrawal is after eight weeks. 



10 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES 

In older to receive financial credit for withdrawal from courses, a student must withdraw 
from the course(s) within the official "add" period. 

SPECIAL NOTICES AND EXPLANATIONS 

The University reserves the right to increase or decrease all fees and charges as well as 
add or delete items of expense without advance notice as circumstances, in the judgment 
of the Administration may require. 

Room and board rates are based on the average cost of operations for the entire school 
year which includes provision for services only during- the scheduled operational days. 
Allowances have, therefore, been made for holidays when the facilities are closed. 

With the exception of special cases in which permission has been obtained from the Dean 
of Students, students from outside the city of Greensboro are required to reside in the 
University dormitories and take board in the University cafeterias. 

Student's property in dormitories and other University buildings is at the sole risk of the 
owner and the University is not responsible for loss or theft of or damage to such property 
arising from any cause. 

Students are required to pay for any loss of or damage to University property at replace- 
ment cost due to abuse, negligence or malicious action, in addition to being subject to 
disciplinary action. 

Rook rental system operation: Books are issued only for courses listed on the students 
approved schedule. Reference books, workbooks and supplies are not provided. Proof of 
official class changes must be presented upon reissue request for other books together with 
the return of texts issued for courses dropped. All rental books must be returned to the 
Bookstore on or before the last day of official scheduled examination to establish eligibility 
for the continued rental of books for a succeeding semester. Students failing to return 
books within two days following the close of the semester of issue will be charged the full 
replacement cost of each book not returned. Students withdrawing during a semester must 
return all rental books on the day of official withdrawal. Provision for rental text purchases 
can be made directly at the Bookstore. 

Personal spending money should be sent directly to and made payable to the student in 
the form of money orders or certified checks. The University cannot cash personal checks 
for students in any amount. 

Diplomas and transcripts of records are withheld until the student has paid in full all 
fees and charges due the University. Further, a student in debt to the University in any 
amount will not be admitted to final examinations in any course, nor will he be permitted 
to register for any subsequent semester until his obligations are paid. Failure to make 
scheduled payments when due will cause the student to be dropped from school for non- 
payment of fees. 

SPECIAL NOTICE TO VETERANS 

Veterans attending school under the provisions of Public Law 89-358 receive a monthly 
subsistence allowance from the Veteran's Administration. Veterans, therefore, are responsible 
for the meeting of all their expenses. 

Veterans attending school under the provisions of Public Law 894 (Disabled Veterans) 
receive a monthly subsistence allowance from the Veterans Administration and in addition 
to this, the Veterans Administration pays directly to the school the cost of the veteran's 
tuition and required fees. A disabled veteran is, therefore, responsible for his room and 
board payments and should be prepared to pay the appropriate room and board payment at 
registration in addition to meeting the scheduled installments for room and board. 



STUDENT LIFE 




STUDENT LIFE 

STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES 

The board objective of the program of Student Personnel Services is to 
aid the student in developing- the attitudes, understandings, insights and the 
skills which will enable him to express himself as a socially competent 
person. The program places special emphasis on campus relationships and 
experiences which complement formal instruction. 

More specifically the program of Student Personnel Services is con- 
ceived as a continuing exercise of identifying and remedying the daily life 
problems of the student. Accordingly, very definite efforts are made: 

1. To help the student to become better acquainted with himself and the 
various problems confronting him. 

2. To help the student to develop the ability to make satisfactory choices 
and adjustments. 

3. To aid the student in making desirable adjustments in group relation- 
ships. 

4. To provide cultural and social experiences which will help the student 
to develop an appreciation for the best in his culture. 

5. To promote the physical, mental, moral and spiritual development of 
the student. 

A number of college officials, faculty and staff members are responsible 
for various phases of the program of Student Personnel Services. These 
include the Dean of Student Affairs, the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, 
the Director of Counseling and Testing Services, Food Services, Religious 
Activities, Housing, Health Services, the Director of Placement Services, 
University Union and the Advisor to Foreign Students, faculty advisors 
and other individuals and agencies. 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICES 

Provision is made for counseling, testing, and guiding all students through 
the Counseling and Testing Office. It is located on the ground floor of 
Dudley Building. 

The Office is staffed with trained counselors who are prepared to deal 
with educational and vocational problems, problems of social adjustment 
and minor personal problems of the student. The staff is trained in both 
group and individual testing covering the areas of intelligence, aptitude, 
personality, interest, and achievement. 

The Counseling and Testing Office conducts a testing program for all 
freshmen. The results of this program are used to assist freshmen in the 
planning of their educational and vocational careers. The Office conducts 
other testing programs that are required or desired by departments of the 
University, also. In addition to these duties, the Office of Counseling and 
Testing cooperates with the Director of Placement in the Placement of 
graduates. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

The University maintains an Infirmary in which it conducts a Health 
Service Program for students. The purposes of the health programs are 

13 



14 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

to safe-guard the health of the students, to promote health habits among 
them, and to protect and improve the health environment of the Universiy 

community. 

The Health Service Center maintains a staff of doctors, dentists, and 
nurses who are qualified to give professional attention to the health prob- 
lems of students. The basic components of the health service program are 
as follows: 

1. Medical Services: 

The University maintains a Director of the Health Services who is 
the University Physician. The University Physician is in attendance 
in the infirmary daily — morning and evening — and is "on call" for 
any emergency situations. 

2. Dental Services: 

A dentist is in attendance weekly — Tuesday mornings and Thursday 
afternoons. 

3. Nursing Services: 

Registered nurses, under the direction of a head nurse, are in at- 
tendance daily on a twenty-four hour basis. 

4. Follow-up and Consultation Services: 

Follow-up services are given, and referrals to specialists are made 
upon recommendation of the University Physician. 

5. Physical Examinations: 

a. Athletes, nursing students, advanced ROTC cadets and other special 
groups of students are given complete physical examinations at the 
Student Health Center each semester or whenever necessary. 

b. All freshmen and transfer students are required to secure a com- 
plete physical examination, a blood test and a chest X-ray and send 
the examination reports to the Director of Health Services before 
they are admitted to the college. The blood test and chest X-ray 
reports must be secured within 60 days prior to the date of enroll- 
ment. Follow-up examinations are made at the Health Center when 
necessary. 

HOUSING 

The residence halls provide opportunities for personal, social, and intel- 
lectual companionship as well as experiences in group living. Each Residence 
Hall is organized and it conducts programs for the development of the 

student. 

Housing facilities for women are provided in Curtis, Gibbs, Holland, 
Morrison, Vanstory and East Campus. Men are housed in Cooper, Scott and 
Senior Hall. 

Rooms are furnished with twin beds, dressers, study tables, and straight 
chairs. Each student who has been approved for living in one of the 
residence halls should bring his blankets. Bed linen will be furnished and is 
included in lodging fees. 

All students, except those who are Greensboro residents or those who 
commute daily from nearby communities, are required to live in one of the 



Student Life 15 

Residence Halls as long as space is available, unless given permission to 
live elsewhere by the Dean of Student Affairs. The University reserves the 
right to approve all off-campus housing. 

Students unable to secure on-campus housing may contact the Office of 
the Director of Off-Campus Housing for assistance in locating university 
approved off-campus housing. (All students are required to file a completed 
Housing Clearance and Information Card with the Director of Housing and 
receive a Housing Clearance Certificate before attempting to register.) 

FOOD SERVICES 

The University provides food service for students at a reasonable cost. 
Two well equipped cafeterias are operated at convenient locations on the 
campus. They include Murphy Hall, located on the main campus and Brown 
Hall, located on the corner of Laurel and Bluford Streets. A snack bar is 
located in the Memorial Union Building. 

Students who live in the residence halls are required to eat in the cafe- 
terias. Students who live in the city may purchase meals also. 

PLACEMENT SERVICES 

The Placement Center is a centralized operation and is responsible for 
placement activity for all schools, divisions and departments of the Uni- 
versity. It is located in Room 201, Dudley Building and provides services 
to all seniors, graduate students as well as other students seeking employ- 
ment. The Center offers a continuing service to graduating students and 
Alumni. 

Placement services to seniors and graduate students include individual 
and group conferences, career counseling, arranging interviews between 
interested students and company representatives on campus. It also pro- 
vides information to students concerning summer employment and part- 
time employment. There is no charge to students, Alumni, or employers for 
this service. 



VETERANS AFFAIRS AND SERVICES 

An information center and clearinghouse services are provided for 
Veterans and War Orphans who are admitted and who plan to receive 
money from the Veterans Administration. 

The following are listed for their information and guidance: 

1. Report to the Veterans Office as soon as you arrive. 

2. Bring any communication you have from the Veterans Administration. 

3. Veterans who are enrolling for the first time should bring their 
separation papers with them. 

4. Be prepared to pay all bills and expenses for the first three (3) 
months. 

5. The Veterans Administration requires fourteen hours for full-time 
student benefits. 



16 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

6. The Veterans Administration pays no money to the University for 
Veterans training. All money is paid directly to the Veteran; therefore 
each veteran is responsible for meeting all of his financial obligations. 

THE MEMORIAL UNION 

The Memorial Union, dedicated and opened during the Spring Semester, 
1966-67, is the "Community Center", serving diverse needs. It embraces a 
great variety of facilities and it performs a multiplicity of functions. It is 
a lounge, reading room, student organizations and activities headquarters, 
workshop, art gallery, theatre, music room, forum, games room, dance and 
party center, office building, outing and recreation center, cultural center, 
ticket bureau, bookstore, conference headquarters, dining room and snack 
bar, information center, barber shop, public relations agency, refuge for 
meditation, guest room and meeting room. The physical proximity it pro- 
vides promotes the sense of community among students, faculty, alumni and 
publics of the University. The Union facilitates a positive recreational 
and cultural mission. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

The University provides a well-balanced program of activities for moral, 
spiritual, cultural and physical development of the students. Religious, 
cultural, social and recreational activities are sponsored by various com- 
mittees, departments, and organizations of the university. Outstanding 
artists, lecturers and dramatic productions are brought to the campus also. 

A listing of student organizations, their purposes, objectives, etc., is pro- 
vided in the Student Handbook, Part I. 

STUDENT CONDUCT 

Students enrolled at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University are expected to conduct themselves properly at all times. They 
are expected to observe standards of behavior and integrity that will reflect 
credit upon themselves, their families and the university. They are expected 
to abide by the laws of the city, state, and nation, and by all rules and 
regulations of the university. 

Accordingly any student who demonstrates an unwillingness to adjust to 
the rules and regulations that are prescribed or that may be prescribed 
to govern the students body will be suspended or expelled from the institu- 
tion. Furthermore, any student whose conduct or behavior is not in harmony 
with the ideals or purposes of the university will be suspended or expelled. 

A student may forfeit the privilege of working for the University when, 
for any reason, he is placed on probation because of misconduct. 



GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

AND REGULATIONS 




GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION AND REGULATIONS 

Admission Policy of the University 

Qualified applicants are admitted to the University without regard to race, 
religion, creed or national origin. 

Admission 

A student who wishes to enter North Carolina Agricultural and Technical 
State University for the first time will be considered for admission if: 

1. The student has graduated from high school with not less than 16 units 
of credit. 

2. The student is transferring from another accredited college or uni- 
versity, is in good standing and has a cumulative average equivalent 
to "C" or above. 

3. The student has graduated from an accredited college or university to 
enter the Graduate School. 

Procedure for New Students 

1. Write to the Director of Admissions for an application blank for 
admission to the University. Fill it out properly and return it to the 
Office of Admissions. 

2. Arrange for the transcript of academic records from high school 
and/or college or university previously attended to be sent directly 
to the Director of Admissions. 

3. All candidates for admission to the freshman class must take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test prior to admission. This test is administered 
by the College Entrance Examination Board several times each year 
at centers throughout the United States and many foreign countries. 
Testing dates are regularly scheduled in November, December, January, 
March, May, and July. Applicants should obtain Bulletins of Infor- 
mation, including application blanks, directly from their high school 
principals or guidance counselors. If these are not available in the 
school, applicants should write directly to the College Entrance Exam- 
ination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey, for a list of testing- 
dates and centers so that assignments may be made to the center 
nearest to the applicant's residence. 

4. After the completed application form, transcripts, and test results 
are received, they will be evaluated, and if approved, the student will 
receive a letter of admission and a permit to register. If the appli- 
cation for admission is not approved, the applicant will be notified. 

5. Each candidate for the Freshman Class, who is scheduled to reside on 
campus, is expected to arrive on the campus the day preceding the 
date designated on the college calendar for freshman orientation. All 
freshmen should be present by 8:00 A.M. on the first day. 

The permit to register furnished beforehand by the Director of Ad- 
missions indicating the School or Department in which the applicant 
wishes to register must be ready for presentation to proper authorities. 
The dates indicated in the college calendar for freshmen orientation 
and registration as well as those for upper-classmen must be strictly 
observed. Those seeking registration after the scheduled date must 
pay a late registration fee of $5.00. 

19 



20 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Entrance Units 

High School graduates should present the following entrance credits, 
distributed as shown below: 

Subject Number of Units 

English 4 

*Mathematics (including one unit of Algebra) 2 

Social Studies (Preferably U. S. History) 1 

Natural Science 1 

Electives 8 

Total 16 

The elective units may be selected from any other high school courses. 
However, students may not present more than two (2) units in activity 
courses, such as music and physical education, and not more than four (4) 
units in vocational courses. 

^Students who plan to major in science or business must have one unit 
of algebra and one unit of plane geometry. 

*Students who plan to major in engineering, mathematics and physics 
must have two units of algebra, one unit of plane geometry, and one-half 
unit of trigonometry. 

Conditional Admission 

Students who present sixteen (16) acceptable entrance units but do not 
meet the entrance requirements in mathematics listed for their curricula 
must take special non-credit courses to meet these deficiencies. The removal 
of deficiencies must begin immediately upon enrollment in the first year 
of study. 

Transfer Students 

Applications from transfer students cannot be considered until all 
credentials are received from the high school and all other institutions 
previously attended. In addition, there must be a statement of good stand- 
ing and honorable dismissal from these institutions. 

Previous college records must show a cumulative average of "C" or 
above. Even with a cumulative average of "C" or above, no course is 
accepted in which a grade below "C" was originally earned. 

Accepted courses are recorded to the student's credit, but grade points 
are not calculated on the transferred courses. The grade points for a 
transfer student are calculated only on the courses taken here and a student 
must complete more than half of his required studies here in order to be 
considered an honor graduate. 

Special Students 

In exceptional cases, an applicant of mature years, with special training 
along particular lines or of long experience in special fields of knowledge, 
may be admitted to the college to pursue a non-degree program or to study 



General Academic Regulations 21 

certain subjects as special students. Even though they do not satisfy 
regular entrance requirements, such persons must submit evidence of ability 
to profit from such a program and must do a passing grade of work or 
forfeit the privilege accorded them. These persons must: 

1. Request of the Director of Admissions an application form, fill it in 
and return it with: 

(A) Records of previous educational experiences. 

(B) Other documentary evidence of ability to pursue the courses 
desired. 

(C) A Statement of the applicant's objectives or purposes in pursuing 
studies chosen. 

Visiting Student 

A student, regularly enrolled in another accredited college or university, 
may enroll at A. and T. State University for one or more courses during a 
regular term. Such special enrollment must be approved by the parent 
institution and A. and T. State University 

Filing of Credentials 

Applicants should take the proper steps to see that their credentials, 
(transcripts, etc.), are sent to the Director of Admissions as early as 
possible, preferably not less than thirty (30) days before the beginning of 
the semester in which they plan to enroll. 

Re-Admission of Former Students 

Former students in good academic standing who have interrupted their 
studies for one or more semesters before graduation are not required to file 
another application for admission to the University. They should write to 
the Director of Admissions, Registration and Records and l'equest a permit 
to register. The identifying information in their letter should include their 
student number, major, last term in attendance and their permanent address. 

Former students who have been dismissed from the University for failure 
to meet the scholastic eligibility requirements may appeal to the Committee 
on Admissions and Retention for a review of their case. The appeal should 
be addressed to the Committee in care of the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

These persons should not present themselves for re-enrollment until they 
have received a reply from the Committee. Appeals should reach the 
Committee at least sixty (60) days prior to the beginning of the term in 
which the person expects to register. 

Former students whose attendance has been interrupted by the University 
for disciplinary reasons must apply to the Dean of Student Affairs for a 
review of their case for possible re-admissions. 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PAYMENT 

1. General: The tuition charge for legal residents of North Carolina is 
less than for nonresidents. To qualify for in-state tuition, a legal resident 
must have maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at least the 
six months next preceding the date of first enrollment or re-enrollment 
in an institution of higher education in this State. 



22 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

2. Minors: The legal residence of a person under twenty-one years of age 
at the time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education 
in this State is that of his parents, surviving parent, or legal guardian. 
In cases where parents are divorced or legally separated, the legal 
residence of the father will control unless custody of the minor has been 
awarded by court order to the mother or to a legal guardian other than 
a parent. No claim of residence in North Carolina based upon residence 
of a guardian in North Carolina will be considered if either parent is 
living unless the action of the court appointing the guardian antedates 
the student's first enrollment in a North Carolina institution of higher 
education by at least twelve months. 

A minor student whose parents move their legal residence from North 
Carolina to a location outside the State shall be considered to be a 
nonresident after six months from the date of removal from the State. 

For the purpose of determining residence requirements under these 
rules, a person will be considered a minor until he has reached his 
twenty-first birthday. Married minors, however, are entitled to establish 
and maintain their residence in the same manner as adults. Attendance 
at an institution of higher education as a student cannot be counted as 
fulfilling the six-month domicile requirement. 

3. Adults: A person twenty-one years of age or older is eligible for in-state 
tuition if he has maintained continuous domicile in North Carolina for 
the six months next preceding the date of enrollment or re-enrollment, 
exclusive of any time spent in attendance at any institution of higher 
education. An in-state student reaching the age of twenty-one is not 
required to reestablish residence provided that he maintains his domicile 
in North Carolina. 

4. Married Students: The legal residence of a wife follows that of her 
husband, except that a woman currently enrolled as an in-state student 
in an institution of higher education may continue as a resident even 
though she marries a nonresident. If the husband is a nonresident and 
separation or divorce occurs, the woman may qualify for in-state tuition 
after establishing her domicile in North Carolina for at least six months 
under the same conditions as she could if she were single. 

5. Military Personnel: No person shall be presumed to have gained or 
lost in-state residence status in North Carolina while serving in the 
Armed Forces. However, a member of the Armed Forces may obtain 
in-state residence status for himself, his spouse, or his children after 
maintaining his domicile in North Carolina for at least six months 
next preceding his or their enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution 
of higher education in this State. 

6. Aliens: Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent 
residence may establish North Carolina residence in the same manner 
as any other nonresident. 

7. Property and Taxes: Ownership of property in or payment of taxes 
to the State of North Carolina apart from legal residence will not 
qualify one for the in-state tuition rate. 

8. Change of Status: The residence status of any student is determined 
as of the time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher educa- 
tion in North Carolina and may not thereafter be changed except: (a) 



General Academic Regulations 23 

in the case of a nonresident student at the time of his first enrollment 
who, or if a minor his parents, has subsequently maintained a legal 
residence in North Carolina for at least six months, and (b) in the case 
of a resident who has abandoned his legal residence in North Carolina 
for a minimum period of six months. In either case, the appropriate 
tuition rate will become effective at the beginning of the term following 
the six-month period. 

9. Respovsibilty of Student: Any student or prospective student in doubt 
concerning his residence status must bear the responsibility for securing 
a ruling by stating his case in writing to the admissions officer. The 
student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change 
in classification, whether from out-of-state to in-state or the reverse, 
has the responsibility of immediately informing the Office of Admissions 
of this circumstance in writing. Failure to give complete and correct in- 
formation regarding residence constitutes grounds for disciplinary action. 

Registration 

The registration dates for each semester are listed on the university 
calendar. Students are urged to register promptly on the dates shown and 
avoid the penalty of paying the LATE REGISTRATION FEE of $5.00. 

The full payment of fees is a part of the registration process and no 
student is registered and entitled to go to classes until the prescribed fees 
have been paid. 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

(Freshmen) 

To be classified as a freshman, a student must have met the minimum 
standards for admission to A. and T. State University. All entering fresh- 
men will be required to take a placement test in reading. Students will be 
assigned to the Reading Classes on the bases of their performance on the 
Reading Test. 

(Sophomore) 

To be classified as a sophomore, a student must have completed a mini- 
mum of 32 semester hours of work open to freshmen and must have earned 
at least a 1.50 average. 

(Junior) 

To be classified as a junior, a student must have completed 64 semester 
hours of work required of sophomores, with at least a 1.70 average. No 
student will receive junior classification until all required freshman and 
sophomore courses have been completed. 

(Senior) 

To be classified as a senior, a student must have completed at least 
96 semester hours of required and major work, with at least a 1.90 average. 
For graduation, a student must have an overall average of 2.00. 



24 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

STUDENT LOAD AND SCHOLASTIC STANDARDS 

(Quantitative) 

The unit of credit is the semester hour. 

A full-time student is one who enrolls for a minimum of twelve (12) 
hours per semester. 

The maximum load a student may carry is twenty-one (21) hours per 
semester. This includes non-credit courses. 



(Grading System) 

Grades are assigned and recorded as follows: 



A 
B 
C 
D 

F 
I 
W 

s 

u 



Description 

Excellent 

Good 

Average 

Below average, but passing 

Failure 

Incomplete 

Withdrew 

Satisfactory (non-credit courses) 

Unsatisfactory (non-credit courses) 



Grade Points 
4 

3 
2 
1 





Students are expected to earn and maintain a general average which will 
permit them to make progress toward graduation. 

The following are minimum grade point averages required to permit a 
student to advance to the next classification: sophomore, 1.50; junior, 1.70; 
senior, 1.90. 

The School Deans or Division Directors and department heads will review 
the academic records of students whose averages fall below these standards 
and recommend probation or suspension for students in this category. 

A student who has been suspended initially from the University because 
a poor scholarship may return on probation after the expiration of one 
semester. A student readmitted after being suspended for poor scholarship 
must earn an average of 2.00 or above each semester in order to remain 
eligible to continue. If he fails to attain the minimum average required, 
he will be dismissed permanently. 

Final grade reports are issued to parents and students at the end of 
each semester. 



Semester Examinations 

A final examination will be required as a part of every course. An ex- 
amination schedule showing time and place of meeting of each course and 
section will be published each semester. Schedules so published will be 
followed without exception. Any changes in the examination schedule must 
be approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 



General Academic Regulations 25 

Changes in Schedules 

A change in a student's class program may be made with the consent of 
the Dean of the School in which the student is enrolled. The student must 
obtain written permission from his Dean, stipulating the specific changes 
to be made, then report to the Office of the Registrar to execute the proper 
forms in making the change. 

Changing Schools 

Students may transfer from one School of the University to another with 
the written approval and acceptance of the Deans of the Schools involved. 
The proper forms on which to apply for such a change are to be obtained 
from the Office of the Registrar and executed at least six week prior to 
the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to tarnsfer. 

Failures 

At the very first opportunity, a student must repeat a required course 
which he has failed, unless the Dean of his School authorizes a suitable 
substitute course. A course which is pre-requisite to another in a sequence 
must be passed before taking the next course in the series. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE 

A student who wishes, or is asked to leave the University at any time 
during the semester shall execute and file official withdrawal forms. These 
forms may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs. They 
should be completed and executed in quadruplicate, (quintuplicate for 
veterans) and taken to the Cashier's Office. For failure to execute these 
forms, a student incurs the penality of receiving an "F" for each course 
in which he is enrolled that semester. 

INCOMPLETES 

Students are expected to complete all requirements of a particular course 
during the semester in which they are registered. However, if at the end 
of the semester, a small portion of the work remains unfinished and should 
be deferred because of the prolonged illness of a student or because of 
some other serious circumstances beyond the control of the student, an "I" 
may be submitted. 

An "I" for a prolonged illness may be submitted only after the written 
approval of the Dean of Students has been secured. An "I" for other causes 
may be submitted only with the approval of the Dean of the School. 

Along the recording of the incomplete grade, the instructor must also, 
file, with the head of the department, the student's average grade and a 
written description of the work which must be completed before the in- 
complete is removed. 

(Procedure for the Removal of an Incomplete) 

An incomplete grade must be removed within SIX WEEKS after the 
beginning of the student's next semester in college. The Registrar will 
notify the student and the instructor of the course in which the incomplete 
was given and if the student has not removed the incomplete within the 
time specified, the instructor will submit a grade of "F". 



26 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

REPEATING COURSES 

Any undergraduate student who received a final grade of D in a course 
listed in his major field may be required by the chairman of the department 
and the dean of the school to repeat the course at the earliest opportunity, 
unless he decided to change his major. However, a student may not repeat 
more than twelve hours of his major courses. 

When a course is repeated, only the higher grade may count toward 
meeting course requirements in the major field. The overall scholastic 
average will reflect both grades. 

If a student is required to repeat a course that is prerequisite to another 
course, he may not take the next course until he has repeated the pre- 
requisite course and obtained a grade of C or higher. 

No required major course may be attempted more than three times. 

HONOR ROLL 

To encourage scholarship, the University publishes an Honor Roll at the 
end of each semester. Regular students whose average grade in all courses 
is "B" shall be eligible for the Honor Roll. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

A candidate for a degree from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical 
State University must satisfy the following requirements: 

1. Choose a specific curriculum leading to a degree in one of the schools 
and complete the requirements of this curriculum. 

2. Complete a minimum of 124 semester hours excluding deficiency 
courses and remedial work for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

3. Complete the core requirements of the University in English, Mathe- 
matics, Natural Science, Social Science, Humanities and Health or 
Physical Education for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

4. Earn an average of two (2) grade points for every semester hour 
undertaken including hours passed or failed. After completing the 
number of credit hours required for graduation, if the student is 
deficient in grade points, he must take additional courses that have 
been approved by his academic dean to secure these points. The 
student must also obtain an average of 2.0 or more in his major 
field. 

5. Complete a minimum of three semesters as a full time student in 
residence at the University. At least one half of the student's credits 
in his major field must be earned here. 

6. Take the Graduate Record Examination and /or the National Teachers 
Examination if applicable to his program. 

7. Clear all academic conditions by the end of the semester preceding 
graduation. 

8. Pay all University bills and fees. 

9. File an application for graduation with the Office of Registrar three 
months prior to the expected date of graduation. 



General Academic Regulations 27 

One of the aims of the University is to prepare men and women who 
will be able representatives of this institution. To this end, the University 
reserves the right to refuse to graduate any student who may be qualified 
academically but who may otherwise seem unfit. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Graduation honors are awarded candidates who complete all requirements 
for graduation in accordance with the following stipulations: (1) Those who 
maintain a general average within the range of 3.00 to 3.24 will receive 
CUM LAUDE, (2) those who maintain a general average within the range 
from 3.25 to 3.49 will receive MAGNA CUM LAUDE, and (3) those who 
maintain a general average within the range of 3.50 to 4.00 will receive 
SUMMA CUM LAUDE. Publication of honors and scholarships is made at 
graduation and in the University Catalog. 

Core Requirements 

The core requirements of the University are as follows: 

English — English 100, 101 

Social Science — History 100, 101 

Natural Science — Biological Science 100 

and Physical Science 100 

or Botany 140 and Zoology 160, 

or Chemistry 101 and 102 

Humanities — Humanities 200 and 201 

Mathematics — Mathematics 101 and 102 or 

Mathematics 111 and 113 

Health Education or 

Physical Education — 2 Semester Hours 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Regular and punctual class attendance is the responsibility of the in- 
dividual student. Moreover, the student is expected to have sufficient 
maturity to assume the responsibility for regular attendance and to accept 
the consequences of failure to attend. 

The non-compulsory class attendance policy places responsibility on the 
student and the instructor. 

Student's Responsibility 

1. The student is responsible for all material covered in each course for 
which he is registered. Absence from class does not relieve him of this 
responsibility. 

2. The student is expected to be present for laboratory periods, scheduled 
examinations, and other activities that may require special preparation. 

3. The student is responsible for initiating any request to make up an 
examination, a laboratory exercise or other work missed because of 
a class absence. If the instructor requests a statement concerning the 
reason for the absence, the student should obtain it from the appro- 
priate officer (eg. the University Physician, the Dean of Student 
Affairs). 

4. The student is expected to report to each class at the beginning of the 
term with a validated schedule and a class admission card. 



28 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Instructor's Responsibility 

1. The instructor is responsible for explaining to the class any specific 
expectations concerning attendance at the beginning of the term. 

2. The instructor is responsible for providing the student with a schedule 
of the examinations and other class requirements that will provide 
a basis for evaluating student performance. 

3. The instructor is responsible for maintaining a record of the attendance 
of the students in his class. 

4. The instructor is expected to warn the student when his academic 
progress is adversely affected by excessive absence from class. 

GRADUATION UNDER A GIVEN CATALOGUE 

A student may expect to earn a degree in accordance with the require- 
ments of the curriculum outlined in the catalogue in force when he first 
entered the University provided the courses are being offered. Moreover, he 
must complete these requirements within six years. On the other hand, 
he may graduate under any subsequent catalogue published while he is a 
student. If a student elects to meet the requirements of a catalogue other 
than the one in force at the time of his original entrance he must meet 
all requirements of the catalogue he elects. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Students who completes one of the four or five year courses of study 
will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Those graduating from a four-year curriculum in the School of Agri- 
culture shall be entitled to the Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural 
Education, Agricultural Science, Agricultural Technology, Agricultural 
Economics, Home Economics Education, Clothing and Textiles, Foods and 
Nutrition, Institution Management or Child Development. 

Those graduating from a four-year curriculum in the School of Arts 
and Sciences shall be entitled to the Bachelor of Science degree in Art, 
English, Foreign Languages, Music, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, 
Physics, Economics, History, Political Science, or Sociology. 

Those graduating from a four-year curriculum in the School of Education 
shall be entitled to the Bachelor of Science degree in Health and Physical 
Education, Psychology, Industrial Arts Education, Industrial Technical 
Education or Vocational Industrial Education. 

Teaching majors are offered in the following areas: Art, Biology, Chem- 
istry, English, French, Mathematics, Music, Physics, History, Social Studies, 
Agricultural Education, Business Education or Home Economics Education. 
These degree programs are offered in cooperation with the School of Arts 
and Sciences, the School of Agriculture and the Division of Business Ad- 
ministration. 

Those graduating from a four or five year curriculum in the School of 
Engineering shall be entitled to the Bachelor of Science degre in Architec- 
tural Engineering*, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Engi- 
neering Mathematics or Engineering Physics. 

Those graduating from a four year curriculum in the Division of Business 
Administration shall be entitled to the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Accounting, Business Administration or Business Education. 

Those graduating from four year curriculum in the School of Nursing 
shall be entitled to the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. 



*Five year program. 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 




SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Burleigh C. Webb, Dean 

Philosophy and Objectives. The School of Agriculture embraces the 
fundamental philosophy of the Land-Grant Institution and it accepts the 
obligation to provide a program of resident and off-campus instruction 
adequate to meet the needs of those who seek this service. It administers 
to the general needs of an interdependent rural-urban society and to the 
special needs of those who desire and benefit from instruction in agriculture, 
and home economics. 

The objectives of the School of Agriculture are two fold: (1) to extend 
the frontiers of knowledge and the professional competencies of its faculty 
and the academic proficiency of its students through organized instruction 
and research and (2) to share its resources with its clientele through 
organized short courses, conferences, and related activities designed to meet 
special needs. 

Departmental Organization. The School of Agriculture is organized into 
the following departments: (1) Agricultural Education, (2) Animal Science, 
(3) Plant Science, (4) Home Economics, (5) Agricultural Economics. 

Requirements for Admission. The requirements for admission to the 
School of Agricultural are the same as the general requirements for ad- 
mission to the University. 

Requirements for Graduation. The requirements for graduation for the 
Bachelor of Science Degree are as follows: 

1. The student must have satisfied the course requirements of an ap- 
proved curriculum in an organized department administered by the 
School of Agriculture. 

2. The student must have earned a cumulative average quality of at least 
a "C" in his major courses and in his overall academic program. 

Curricula. The curricula of the School of Agriculture are designed to 
provide the students who pursue courses of instruction leading to the 
Bachelor of Science Degree (1) a fundamental understanding of the basic 
physical and biological sciences which are applied to their respective majors; 
(2) liberal educational experiences offered by the University; and (3) a 
knowledge and competency required for specialization in any one of the 
major offerings: 

Major offerings are as follows: 

A. Technical Agriculture 

1. Agricultural Business 

2. Agricultural Education 

3. Agricultural Science 

4. Agricultural Technology 

B. Home Economics 

1. Clothing, Textiles and Related Art 

2. Food and Nutrition 

3. Home Economics Education 

4. Child Development 

31 



32 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

A. Technical Agriculture 

The curricula and courses in Technical Agriculture are related to career 
opportunities in the various fields: (1) Farm Production and Technology; 
(2) Off-Farm Businesses and Industries related to farming and (3) Re- 
search and Education. In recognition that each of these fields requires a 
body of knowledge common to all, and that each has a body of knowledge 
distinctly peculiar to it, the curricula in Technology, Business, and Science 
are designed to provide certain required courses and at the same time 
provide a rather wide degree of flexibility which the student may use to his 
advantage by selecting courses in consultation with his faculty advisor that 
will meet his particular needs and objectives. These curricula are designed 
to serve the industry of agriculture specifically and the public in general. 
They provide educational opportunities for students interested in the many 
sectors of agricultural industries and the intellectual background on which 
students can build satisfying lives through service. 

Agricultural Busiyiess. The Agricultural Business major is designed for 
those students interested in the business industry phase of Agriculture. 
The objective of the program of instruction in this major is to equip 
students for employment in those industries that furnish supplies and 
services to farmers and those that store, process, distribute, and merchan- 
dise the products of the farm. Graduates in this major are specially equipped 
for employment as salesmen, managers, public relations and technical 
supervisors with companies dealing with feed, seed, fertilizer, food pro- 
cessing and other such industries. 

Agricultural Economics. The curriculum in Agricultural Science with an 
option in Agricultural Economics is administered jointly by the School of 
Agriculture and the Department of Economics in the School of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Agricultural Education. The curriculum in Agricultural Education offers 
the student a program of study designed to develop competency in teaching 
and related types of work. The curriculum is especially suited for the 
student who aspires to become a teacher of Vocational Agriculture or Agri- 
cultural Extension. 

The student who wishes to major in Agricultural Education should, 
preferably at the beginning of the sophomore year or before his junior 
year, plan with his faculty advisor a course of study which will meet the 
certification requirements of teachers of Vocational Agriculture in North 
Carolina. 

Agricultural Science. The objective of this program is to provide an 
opportunity for the student to develop competency in the scientific dis- 
ciplines essential to graduate study, scientific agriculture, and research. 

Agricultural Technology. The curriculum in Agricultural Technology 
provides an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in a specialized 
area of agricultural production. The program of instruction for the student 
who pursues this program places emphasis on the development of com- 
petency in the management and operation of commercial farms or in 
related industry that require specialized knowledge and technical skills. 

B. Home Economics 

The curricula leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics are offered in the area of (1) Clothing, Textiles and Related 
Art, (2) Food and Nutrition, (3) Home Economics Education, and (4) 
Child Development. 



School of Agriculture 33 

Clothing, Textiles, a?id Related Arts. This major leads to professional 
opportunities in clothing, textiles, fashion and business. 

Food and Nutrition. The major in food and nutrition provides three 
options: (1) Food and Nutrition, (2) Therapeutic Dietetics, and (3) Food 
Administration. 

Home Economics Education. The Home Economics Education major is 
designed to provide the necessary training and skills for teachers of home 
economics, for graduate study and for a variety of careers with service 
organizations with concern for individual and family development. 

Child Development. The major in Child Development offers two options — 
(1) Child Development, which prepares students for positions as directors 
of nursery school and kindergarten programs, and (2) Early Childhood 
Education, which prepares students for teaching positions in Kindergarten 
through Grade 3. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

The Agricultural Economics majors may choose to concentrate in either 
Agricultural Business or Agricultural Science. The former is concerned with 
the business or industrial phase of agriculture; the latter group would be 
more interested in graduate study and research. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

A. P. Bell, Chairman 

The Department of Agricultural Education prepares students for positions 
in educational fields in agriculture and related areas including schools and 
colleges, agricultural extension, business, trade and professional associa- 
tions, and government agencies. The Department administers a program 
approved by the State Department of Public Instruction for the prepara- 
tion of teachers of agriculture in the public school systems. The program 
includes courses in general education, professional education, and technical 
agriculture. 

PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION MAJORS 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

Social Science 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140 4 — 

Zoology 160 — 4 

Animal Husbandry 301 — 3 

Physical Education 101, 103 1 1 

Education 100 1 — 

Air or Military Science (Elective) (1) (1) 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 1 1 

17 19 



34 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Sophomore Yeor 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 250 — 

Psychology 320 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

Plant Science 110 — 

Agricultural Engineering 114 — 

Dairy Husbandry 311 3 

Poultry Husbandry 317 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Health Education 200 2 

Agricultural Economics 330 — 

or Economics 301 — 

Air or Military Science (Elective) (2) 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 
3 

(2) 



18 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Agricultural Education 400, 402 2 

Agricultural Education 401, 403 2 

Technical Agricultural Electives 3 

Bacteriology 121 4 

Earth Science 309 — 

Education 400 3 

Psychology 431 — 

Free Electives 3 



18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Agricultural Economics 332 3 

Agricultural Education 501, 502 3 

Agricultural Engineering 525 - — 

Rural Sociology 2 

Technical Agriculture Electives 3 

Zoology 468 or Botany 530 3 

Agricultural Education 503 — 



18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



14 



11 



Twelve credit should be completed in one subject matter area (Technical 
Agriculture) of specialization. See page 176-177 for University require- 
ments in Teacher Education. 

In addition to the above curriculum, the agricultural education major 
may follow a degree program with concentration in one of the following 
areas of technical agriculture: 
Agricultural Economics 
Agricultural Engineering 
Animal Science, including Animal Husbandry, Dairy Husbandry, and 

Poultry Husbandry 
Plant Science, including Crop Science, Soil Science, and Horticulture 



School of Agriculture 35 

The program will be worked out on individual bases by the student and 
his adviser. The student will be co-advised by the Agricultural Education 
Staff and a staff member from the subject matter area in which the student 
does his concentration. 

COURSE OFFERINGS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Undergraduate 

101. Agricultural Education. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly General Agriculture 1000) 

A study of the broad base of modern agriculture with emphasis on current 
trends and opportunities. 

102. Agricultural Eduaction. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly General Agriculture 1001) 

A continuation of 101 with special emphasis on the development of agri- 
culture as a modern technology and the impact of science on its development. 

400. Audio-Visual Aids in Occupational and Technical Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1240) Credit 2(1-2) 

Techniques in preparing, using, and evaluating audio-visual aids in oc- 
cupational and technical education. It includes the use of pictorial materials 
applied to teaching agriculture and the operation and adjustment of equip- 
ment found in departments of vocational agriculture. 

401. Youth Organizations and Leadership in Secondary Schools. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1241) Credit 2(2-0) 

Practices and procedures of setting up local, district, and State organiza- 
tions. Emphasis will be placed on duties and responsibilities of officers and 
members and how to take advantage of training opportunities. 

402. Secondary Education in Agriculture. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1242) 

Designed to acquaint students with the historical objectives of vocational 
education and agriculture, the problems in the area of secondary schools, 
and some solutions. 

403. Materials and Methods of Teaching Out-of-School Groups. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1243) . Credit 2(2-0) 

Methods and materials used in teaching adults and young farmers. It 
will include developing and using various teaching devices and aids for 
out-of-school groups. 

501. Materials and Methods of Teaching Agricultural Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1261) Credit 3(3-0) 

Principles of teaching as applied to agriculture in secondary schools. 

Preparing and using lesson plans and organizing teaching aids to meet 

community needs. Prerequisites: Agricultural Education 400 and 402; 

Psychology 320. 

502. Student Teaching. Credit 6(6-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1262) 

Students will be required to spend twelve weeks in an approved teaching 
center doing observation and directed student teaching. Prerequisite: Agri- 
cultural Education 501. 



36 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

503. Evaluation and Problems in Teaching Agricultural Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1263) Credit 2(2-0) 

The process of discovering and analyzing problems in the field; program 

building, and evaluation of instruction in vocational education. This will 

include an appraisal of all phases taught by the teacher of agriculture. 

Prerequisites: Agricultural Education 501 and 502. 

Advanced Undergradaute and Graduate 

601. Adult Education in Occupational Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1271) 

A study of the principles and problems of organizing and conducting 
programs for adults. Emphasis is given to the principles of conducting 
organized instruction. 

602. The Principles of Agricultural Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1272) 

A study of the principles and practices in agricultural education revealed 
by research and new trends. 

603. Problem Teaching in Agricultural Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1273) 

Practices in setting up problems for teaching unit courses in vocational 
agriculture. 

604. Public Relations in Vocational Agriculture. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1274) 

Principles and practices of organizing, developing, and implementing 
public relations for promoting local programs. 

605. Guidance and Group Instruction in Occupational Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1275) Credit 3(3-0) 

Guidance and group instruction applied to agricultural occupations and 
other problems of students in vocational education. 

606. Cooperative Work-Study Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 
Principles, theories, organizations, and administration of cooperative work 

experience programs. 

Graduate 

These courses are open to graduate students only. See the Bulletin of 
the Graduate School for course descriptions. 

700. Seminar in Agricultural Education. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1285) 

702. Methods and Techniques of Public Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1286) 

703. Research in Agricultural Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1287) 

704. Philosophy of Ocupational Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1288) 

705. Recent Developments and Trends in Agricultural Education. 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1289) Credit 3(3-0) 



School of Agriculture 37 

750. Community Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1290) 

751. Methods and Techniques of Supervision in Agricultural Education. 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1291) Credit 3(3-0) 

752. Administration and Supervision. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1292) 

753. Program Planning. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1293) 

754. History of Agricultural Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ag-Ed 1294) 

760. Thesis Research in Agricultural Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag-Ed 1299) 

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Talmage Brewer, Acting Chairman 

1. The Department of Animal Science offers courses designed to meet the 
diverse interests of students by offering a choice of several options of 
study in which the students may specialize. Students wishing a major 
in Agricultural Sciences or Agricultural Technology may concentrate in 
either of the following fields of specialization: Animal Science, Dairy 
Science, Dairy Manufacturing or Poultry Science. 

The specialized options of the students are particularly well suited 
for positions as farm managers, professional workers in agricultural 
industries and government employment. 

2. A Pre-Veterinary Science Program, which is an option to the Animal 
Science curriculum and referred to as the 3-1 plan, is also offered by 
the Department. The 3-1 designation is given because under the plan, 
three years of work is done toward the B.S. Degree in Animal Science 
at A&T, and upon successful completion of the first professional year 
at Veterinary School the student would be eligible for the Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Animal Science. One of the main advantages of such 
a plan is to provide an opportunity for the Animal Science major to 
obtain both the B.S. and the DVM Degrees without interrupting the 
continuity of his academic program. 

3. The freshman and sophomore years are devoted mostly to a program 

of general education which provides background in the social and 
physical sciences, and mathematics, and includes an introduction to the 
humanities as well as introductory courses to the study of Animal 
Science. 

PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY MAJORS 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Social Science 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140; Zoology 160 4 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 1 1 

Education 100 1 — 

Air or Military Science (optional) 1 1 

17-18 16-17 



38 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Sophomore Year 



Course and Number 



Humanities 200, 201 

Chemistry 101, 102 

Animal Science 301; Poultry Science 317 
Dairy Science 311; Plant Science 110 

Agricultural Economics 330 

Health Education 200 

Air or Military Science (potional) 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 
Credit 

3 
4 
3 
3 
3 



16-18 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



Course and Number 

Economics 301; Agricultural Economics 332 3 

General Microbiology 121 4 

Agricultural Engineering 114; Soil Science 338 3 

*Electives (Major Area) 4 

Electives 3 



S)>ring Semester 
Credit 

3 
4 
3 
3 



15-17 



S]>ring Semester 
Credit 



Senior Year 



Course and Number 

Animal Science 404; Soil Science 517 
Animal Science 443; Agricultural 

Engineering 402 

*Electives (Major Area) 



17 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



14 



Supporting Courses (Elective) 



14 



Agricultural Economics 334, 336; Business 440, 458; Speech 250, 251; 
Agricultural Engineering 303, 522; Industrial Technology 410; Mathematics 
240. 

PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE MAJORS 



Freshman Year 



Course and Number 



English 100, 101 

Social Science 100, 101 

Botany 140; Zoology 160 

Mathematics 111, 113 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 

Education 100 

Air or Military Science (optional) 



Fall Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 



17-18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
4 
4 

1 



16-17 



*The 28 credits as major electives are to be taken such that: 12 credits are selected from 
supporting 1 courses; 16 credits are selected from the area of concentration with approval of 
the advisor. 



School of Agriculture 



39 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

Agricultural Engineering 113; 

Animal Science 301 3 

Plant Science 110; Poultry Science 317 3 

Health Education 200 2 

Air or Military Science (optional) 2 

15-17 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Physics 211, 212 4 

Soil Science 338 — 

Chemistry 221; Economics 301 5 

*Electives (Major Area) 6 

Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 

4 



13-15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 

4 
3 
3 
3 



18 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 224 — 

Agricultural Economics 330 3 

Bacteriology 4 

*Electives (Major Area) 9 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



12 



16 



15 



Supporting Courses (Electives) 

Zoology 461, 465, 466; Agricultural Economics 332, 334, 336; Chemistry 
222,251; Speech 250, 251. 

PRE-VETERINARY ANIMAL SCIENCE PROGRAM 
Suggested Curriculum 

First Year 

Fall Semester S]>ring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

Social Science 100, 101 3 3 

Botany 140; Zoology 160 4 4 

General Agriculture 101, 102 1 1 

Education 100 1 1 



17 



17 



*The 30 credits required as major electives are to be taken such that: 12 credits are 
elected from supporting courses; 18 credits are elected from the area of concentration with 
approval of the advisor. 



40 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Second Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

Animal Science 301; Dairy Science 311 3 

^Restricted Electives 3 

Poultry 317 — 

Health Education 200 2 

15 

Third Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Physics 225, 226 4 

Animal Science Electives 6 

Bacteriology 121 — 

Chemistry 221 5 

Electives 3 

18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
4 
3 
3 
3 



16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



COURSES IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 



Undergraduate 



Credit 3(2-2) 



301. Principles of Animal Science. 

(Formerly 1301) 

An introduction to the livestock-meat industry involving the fundamentals 
of modern livestock production, marketing and processing, including animal 
nutrition, reproduction, market classes and grades, meat processing and 
technology and milk production. 

302. Judging and Selecting Dairy and Meat Animals. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1302) 

Detailed consideration of factors involved in selection and evaluation of 
beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep and horses. Ability to present ac- 
curate, clear and concise reasons is stressed. 

401. Meat and Meat Products. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1321) 

Slaughtering and cutting carcasses of cattle, sheep and hogs. Factors 
affecting quality, palatability, and economy in selection of meats. 

402. Animal Breeding. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1322) 

A study of the principles of genetics as applied to the improvement of 
animals and some of the methods and problems of the breeder. 

320. Livestock Production. Credit 4(3-2) 

(Formerly 1323) 
Breeds of beef cattle, swine and sheep — their selection, care and manage- 
ment. 



*See major adviser. 



School of Agriculture 41 

404. Livestock Feeding. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1324) 
Principles of feeding and composition of feeds. 

441. Anatomy and Physiology of Farm Animals. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1341) 

Designed to acquaint students with structure and functions of organs, 
tissues and systems of farm animals. 

442. Physiology of Reproduction of Farm Animals. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1342) 

Anatomy of the reproduction organs with detailed coverage of the 
physiology processes involved and of factors controlling and influencing 
them. 

443. Disease of Farm Animals. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 1343) 

The common disease of livestock with reference to cause, prevention and 
treatment. 

601. Principles of Animal Nutrition. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1371) 

Fundamentals of modern animal nutrition including classification of 
nutrients, their general metabolism and role in productive functions. (Pre- 
requisite A. S. 404) 

602. Animal Science Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly 1372) 

A review and discussion of current literature pertaining to all phases of 
Animal Science. 

603. Advanced Livestock Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1373) 

Special work in problems in dealing with feeding, breeding, and manage- 
ment in the production of beef cattle, sheep and swine. 

COURSES IN DAIRY SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

311. Principles of Dairying. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1311) 

The fundamental principles of dairying, types of dairy cattle; the com- 
position of milk, its chemical and physical properties, sampling and testing 
of milk; selection and herd management. 

312. Dairy Technology. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 1312) 

The composition of milk and milk products; study of the Babcock test 
for fat in milk and cream and use of modified Babcock test for fat in other 
dairy products. (Prerequisite Dia. Sci. 311.) 

313. Dairy and Food Plant Sanitation. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 1313) 

Principles and procedures, sanitary standards and regulations for milk 
food products; equipment cleaning and detergents used for an effective job. 



42 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

314. Dairy Plant Practice. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly 1314) 
Assigned practice work at the college dairy and the milk and ice cream 
laboratories of the college dairy plant; given for both dairy manufacturing 
and dairy science majors. (Prerequisite — three dairy courses.) 

405. Dairy Plant Management. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 325) 

The organization and management of dairy plant; procurement of raw 
supplies; plant layout; equipment for plants, distribution of products, cost 
and operation, and record keeping. 

406. Dairy Products Judging. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 1326) 

Standards and grades of dairy products; practice in judging milk, cream, 
butter, and ice cream. 

407. Market Milk. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 1327) 

The market milk industry, milk ordinances, city milk, supply, transporta- 
tion, grading, pasteurizing, bottling and distribution. (Prerequisite Da. Sci. 
311,312.) 

408. Advanced Dairy Technology. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 1328) 

Theory of and practice in analytical methods used for control in the dairy 
manufacturing plant. (Prerequisite Dairy Sci. 407) 

409. Ice Cream Making. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1329) 

The principles involved in the manufacturing of commercial ice cream 
and ices. 

430. Dairy Cattle and Milk Production. Credit 4(3-2) 

(Formerly 1330) 

Breeds of dairy cattle; problems of economical milk production; fitting 
and showing. 

444. Dairy Breeds and Pedigrees. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 1344) 

A study of dairy pedigrees and breed families; testing and association 
methods. 

445. Dairy Cattle Judging. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 1345) 

Characteristics of dairy breeds and score card requirements; relation of 
type, form and function to the value of selection. Practice judging. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

604. Dairy Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly 1374) 
Assignments of papers on subjects relating to the dairy industry and 
methods of preparing and presenting such papers. 



School of Agriculture 43 

606. Special Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1376) 
Assignment of work along special lines in which a student may be 
interested, given largely by the project method for individuals either in 
Dairy Manufacturing or Dairy Science. (Prerequisite — three advanced 
courses in dairying.) 

COURSES IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

317. Poultry Production. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1317) 
Practices and principles of poultry production. 

330. Fundamentals of Poultry Breeding. Credit 4(3-2) 

(Formerly 1338) 
Breeding and selection and improvement of stock. (Prerequisite Poultry 
Sci. 317.) 

501. Diseases and Parasites of Poultry. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1356) 
Poultry hygiene; causes of diseases; symptoms and control of diseases 
and parasites. (Prerequisite Poultry Sci. 317.) 

503. Incubation and Hatchery Management. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly 1357) 
Management of poultry farm and hatchery operation. (Prerequisite 
Poultry Sci. 317.) 

505. Processing and Marketing of Poultry Products. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1358) 
Methods of killing, dressing, grading and storage of poultry meats and 
the grading and storage of eggs; transportation of poultry products and 
factors influencing price. (Prerequisite Poultry Sci. 317.) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

608. Poultry Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly 1378) 

Special articles and reports on subjects relating to the poultry industry 
will be assigned each student with round table discussion. 

609. Poultry Anatomy and Physiology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1379) 

A course which deals with the structure and function of tissues, organs, 
and systems of the domestic fowl. (Prerequisite Poultry Sci. 501.) 

690. Special Problems in Poultry. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1380) 
Assignment of work along special lines in which a student may be in- 
terested, given largely by project method for individuals in Poultry Science. 
(Prerequisite — Three advanced courses in Poultry Sci.) 



44 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

GRADUATE COURSES 

These courses are open to graduate students only. See the bulletin of the 
Graduate School for course descriptions. 

GRADUATE COURSES IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

690. Selection of Meat and Meat Products. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1385) 

702. Advanced Livestock Marketing. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1386) 

703. Advanced Livestock Production. Credit 3(2-2) 

GRADUATE COURSE IN DAIRY SCIENCE 

705. Advanced Dairy Farm Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1385) 

GRADUATE COURSE IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

780. Poultry Research. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly 1394) 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Cecile H. Edwards, Chairman 

The curricular requirements of the Department of Home Economics have 
been selected to provide a background for the development of competencies 
and values which will: 

1. Make possible satisfying personal, group, and family relationships as 
a basis for active participation in a democratic society; 

2. Lead to the enrichment of home and family living through the ap- 
preciation and use of art and advances in science and technology; 

3. Develop understanding and appreciation of varying cultural back- 
grounds; and 

4. Prepare the individual for gainful employment in one of the major 
areas of the profession. 

Home Economics courses are not restricted to majors in the Department. 
All introductory courses may be taken by any student. Admittance to other 
courses may be secured upon receiving approval of the instructor. 

The Department of Home Economics offers a graduate program leading 
to the Master of Science degree in Food and Nutrition. This program leads 
to opportunities as nutrition specialists; food specialists in journalism, 
radio and television; public health nutritionists; college teachers; and re- 
search technicians in food and nutrition. 



School of Agriculture 



45 



MAJOR AREAS IN THE DEPARTMENT 

The department offers the Bachelor of Science degree with majors in the 
following- areas: (1) Child Development — CD; (2) Clothing, Textiles and 
Related Art — CTA; (3) Food and Nutrition— FN; and (4) Home Economics 
Education — HEc. The Child Development major provides options in (1) 
Child Development and (2) Early Childhood Education. The Food and 
Nutrition major offers options in (1) Food and Nutrition, (2) Therapeutic 
Dietetics, and (3) Food Administration. Information concerning the gradu- 
ation requirements for each of the four areas is given in the following 
pages. 

The selection of electives must be approved by the student's adviser. 

PROGRAM FOR THE MAJOR IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

This program is designed to provide a broad knowledge of children 
through the study of their development and relationships. Two options are 
offered: (1) Child Development, and (2) Early Childhood Education. 

OPTION 1 : CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

This program provides a core of Child Development and related courses 
with a wide choice of electives. Students can select supporting courses in 
psychology, sociology, food and nutrition or other areas of special interest. 
A variety of appropriate experiences with young children is an integral 
part of the program. Employment opportunities for students in this 
curriculum include working in preschool programs, public and private, or 
for admission to graduate study. 

PROGRAM FOR THE OPTION IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101 3 

Physical Education 102, 104 1 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 122 2 

Home Economics 101 1 

Physical Science 100 — 

Health Education 200 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
3 
1 



14 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Child Development 311, 312 3 

Child Development 315 — 

Zoology 160, 461 4 

Art 226 3 

Sociology 203 — 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 



16 



46 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Child Development 414 3 

Child Development 416 3 

Child Development 418 3 

Food and Nutrition 437 — 

Home Economics 400, 403 3 

Child Development 413 — 

English 250 — 

Anthropology 200 — 

Education 301 3 

Electives — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 



17 



Senior Yeor 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Child Development 519 6 

Child Development 610 — 

Child Development 612 3 

Home Economics 401 — 

Electives 6 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 



15 



OPTION 2: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

The program in Early Childhood Education is designed to provide 
teachers with the competencies and understandings essential for teaching 
children in kindergarten through grade 3. Satisfactory completion of this 
curriculum leads to K-3 certification. This program is offered in cooperation 
with the Department of Education. 



PROGRAM FOR THE OPTION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 111 4 

History 100, 101 3 

Physical Education 102, 104 1 

Home Economics 101 1 

Physical Science 100 — 

Art 226 3 

Sociology 203 — 

Child Development 315 — 

Health Education 200 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



18 



School of Agriculture 47 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Child Development, 311, 312 3 3 

Child Development 413 — 3 

Zoology 160, 461 4 4 

Education 301 — 2 

Food and Nutrition 437 — 3 

English 250 2 — 

15 18 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Home Economics 401 — 3 

Anthropology 200 3 

Education 462 2 — 

Child Development 414, 415 3 3 

Child Development 416, 417 3 3 

Child Development 418, 419 3 3 

Electives 3 3 

17 15 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Sj>ring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Child Development 613 (Education 684) — 3 

Child Development 614 (Education 683) 3 — 

Child Development 610, 612 3 2 

Education 636 3 — 

Education 558 — 6 

Electives 4 — 

13 11 

PROGRAM FOR THE MAJOR IN CLOTHING, TEXTILES AND RELATED ART 

This major leads to professional opportunities in clothing, textiles, fashion 
and business. 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Si>ring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Home Economics 101 1 — 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

Art 100 3 — 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 122, 123, 124 5 3 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Food and Nutrition 133 — 3 

History 100 — 3 

Physical Education 102, 104 1 1 

17 17 



48 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

History 101 3 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 321, 323 4 

Art 226 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Chemistry 104, 105 4 

Home Economics 400 — 

Health Education 200 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



15 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 423 4 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 424, 426 — 

Psychology 320 3 

Home Economics 401 — 

Sociology 203 — 

French 100 3 

Electives 5 

15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



5 
18 



Senior Year 

Course and Number 

Anthropology 200 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 621, 521, 622 
Electives 



Fall Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



14 



14 



PROGRAM FOR THE MAJOR IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

The major in food and nutrition provides three options: (1) Food and 
Nutrition, (2) Therapeutic Dietetics, and (3) Food Administration. 

The program in food and nutrition provides a strong background for the 
interpretation and creative use of knowledge of food and nutrition. 

Programs in Therapeutic Dietetics and Food Administration are designed 
to meet the academic requirements of the American Dietetic Association. 
Graduates are eligible for internships in institutions that have received 
approval from the Association. These programs offer excellent professional 
opportunities for men and women who are interested in the service of food 
for large groups of people. 



PROGRAM FOR THE OPTION IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

The option in food and nutrition provides preparation for positions as 
clinical nutritionists, assistant technicians in food testing and research, and 
for graduate study. 



School of Agriculture 



49 



OPTION 1: FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 122 — 

Home Economics 101 1 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 

Physical Education 102, 104 1 

History 100, 101 3 

Zoology 160, 461 4 

17 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Bacteriology 121 — 

English 250 2 

Psychology 320 3 

Food and Nutrition 130 — 

Physics 201 3 

15 
Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Health Education 200 2 

Chemistry 221, 222 5 

Food and Nutrition 337, 338 3 

Food and Nutrition 331, 436 2 

Food and Nutrition 439 — 

Home Economics 401, 403 3 

15 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 231, 251 4 

Food and Nutrition 535 3 

Food and Nutrition 637, 638 3 

Food and Nutrition 630, 639 — 

Electives 4 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



4 
1 
3 
4 

18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 

4 



4 
15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



14 14 

PROGRAM FOR THE OPTION IN THERAPEUTIC DIETETICS 

The option in Therapeutic Dietetics should be selected by students in- 
terested in therapeutic or administrative dietetics in institutions such as 
hospitals. This option prepares students for clinical internships or graduate 
study. 



50 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



OPTION 2: THERAPEUTIC DIETETICS 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Zoology 160, 461 4 

Home Economics 101 1 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101 3 

Physical Education 102, 104 1 

Health Education 200 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 
Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 104, 105 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Food and Nutrition 130 — 

Psychology 320 3 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 122 2 

Food Administration 344 3 

Food Administration 345, 346 — 

English 250 2 

17 
Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Food and Nutrition 337, 338 3 

Chemistry 251 — 

Bacteriology 121 4 

Psychology 435 — 

Food Administration 447, 448 5 

Food and Nutrition 331 2 

Electives 3 

17 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Food and Nutrition 630 — 

Home Economics 401, 403 6 

Food Administration 544 — 

Electives 6 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



7 
18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 

3 

4 

4 
17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



12 



11 



PROGRAM FOR THE OPTION IN FOOD ADMINISTRATION 



This option is designed for students interested in food service administra- 
tion in hospitals, business, industry or educational institutions. Selection of 



School of Agriculture 



51 



this option qualifies the graduate for (1) employment in assistant super- 
visory positions in food businesses or industrial plant cafeterias, (2) the 
operation of private businesses, (3) approved Food Service Administration 
Internships, or (4) graduate study in Hotel or Food Administration. 

OPTION 3: FOOD ADMINISTRATION 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Zoology 160, 461 4 

Home Economics 101 1 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101 3 

Physical Education 102, 104 1 

Health Education 200 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
4 

3 
3 
1 
2 



16 



17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Chemistry 104, 105 4 

Business Administration 305 3 

Accounting 221, 222 3 

Food Administration 344 3 

Food Administration 346 — 

Food and Nutrition 130 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 

4 



16 
Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Food and Nutrition 337, 338, 345 3 

Food Administration 447, 448 5 

Psychology 320 3 

Economics 301 3 

Accounting 441, 442 3 

Bacteriology 121 — 

Food and Nutrition 331 2 



18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



19 
Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Business Administration 569 3 

Food Administration 549, 544 3 

Home Economics 401 3 

Electives 4 



13 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



52 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



PROGRAM FOR THE MAJOR IN HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

The Home Economics Education major is designed to provide the neces- 
sary training and skills for teachers of Home Economics, for graduate 
study and for a variety of careers with service organizations with concern 
for individual and family development. A student cannot receive a major 
in Home Economics Education without the education requirements requisite 
for teacher preparation. 

The selection of electives should be made in consultation with the 
student's adviser. See page 176-177 for University requirements in teacher 
education. 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

Physical Education 102, 104 1 1 

Zoology 160, 461 4 4 

Home Economics 101 1 — 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 122 — 2 



16 



17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Health Education 200 2 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 320 — 

Chemistry 104, 105 4 

Education 300, 301 2 

Art 226 3 

Food and Nutrition 130 — 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 123 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



16 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Food and Nutrition 337 3 

Clothing, Textiles & Related Art 321 . . . — 

English 250 2 

Child Development 311 3 

Physics 201 3 

Economics 301 — 

Home Economics 400, 401 3 

Education 400 — 

Home Economics 505 or Food and 

Nutrition 331 and Elective 3 

Home Economics 403 3 



Sj/ring Semester 
Credit 



4-5 



17 



17-18 



School of Agriculture 53 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Home Economics 503 2 — 

Education 528, 500, 560 3 9 

Home Economics 502 2 - — 

Home Economics 505 or Food and 

Nutrition 331 and Elective 7-8 — 

Home Economics 604 — 2 



14-15 11 

COURSES IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Undergraduate 

311. Child Development I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly CD 1921) 

A cross-cultural study of the behavior, development, and relationships of 
the young child in a familial context. (Laboratory required for observation 
of 3-, 4- and 5-year-old children). 

312. Child Development II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly CD 1922) 

A comprehensive study of physical, social and psychological development 
from middle childhood through adolescence. Individual students plan field 
study of adolescents in groups as part of course content. (Prerequisite 
CD 311.) 

315. Study of the Child in Family and Community. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly CD 1925) 

Historical background and present-day philosophies of child study, parent 
education and early childhood education. This course covers techniques of 
child study and of parent and community involvement. 

413. Infant Development. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly CD 1923) 

This course focuses upon the importance of infancy as a crucial period in 
human development and covers the following categories: prenatal, perinatal 
and neonatal development; infant learning and copying; personality; and 
infant care and deprivation. (Prerequisite CD 311.) 

414. Creative Activities I. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly CD 1926) 

Fine and applied arts-creative use of media with young children; to 
include art, music and rhythmics, (nursery school and kindergarten) 

415. Creative Activities II. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly CD 1926) 

Fine and applied arts-creative use of media with young children; to 
include art, music and rhythmics, (grades 1, 2 and 3) 

416. Literature and Language Arts I. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly CD 1927) 

A survey of literature for young children and media and methodology of 
reading, (nursery school and kindergarten) 



54 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

417. Literature and Language Arts II. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly CD 1927) 

A survey of literature for young children and media and methodology of 
reading, (grades 1, 2 and 3) 

418. Science and Social Studies I. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly CD 1952) 

A study of the basic concepts from the physical, mathematical and social 
sciences necessary for the instruction of young children. Special emphasis 
is placed upon ecological studies and the development of human cultures 
and relationships, (nursery school and kindergarten) 

419. Science and Social Studies II. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly CD 1952) 

A study of the basic concepts from the physical, mathematical and social 
sciences necessary for the instruction of young children. Special emphasis 
is placed upon ecological studies and the development of human cultures 
and relationships, (grades 1, 2 and 3) 

519. Practicum in Child Development. Credit 6(2-8) 

(Formerly CD 1969) 
Methods, observation and guided experiences in the preschool laboratory 
(for majors in Option 1). 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

610. Measurement and Evaluation in Child Development. 

(Formerly CD 1970) Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the methods of measurement, evaluation and diagnosis in 
learning-teaching situations. 

612. Senior Seminar. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly CD 1971 and 1972) 

A review of recent research findings and discussion of current trends 
and information related to young children. 

613. Methods in Early Childhood. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly CD 1968 and 1973, also Education 684) 

Administration, principles, practices, methods, and resources in the organi- 
zation of preschool and primary programs. An interdisciplinary and team 
approach. Observation of teaching styles and strategies. 

614. Curriculum in Early Childhood. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly CD 1974, also Education 683) 

Curriculum experiences and program planning appropriate to early child- 
hood education. 

Graduate 

715. Special Problems in Child Development. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly CD 1985) 
Opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups on 
child development problems of special interest. Work may represent either 
survey of a given field or intensive investigation of a particular problem. 
The student should consult the instructor before registering for this course. 



School of Agriculture 55 

COURSES IN CLOTHING, TEXTILES AND RELATED ART 
Undergraduate 

122. Clothing for the Family. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly CTA 1802) 

A study of the individual clothing needs of family members; wardrobe 
planning; socio-economic and psychological aspects of clothing; buying 
principles, procedures and practices. 

123. Textiles. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly CTA 1820) 

Textile fibers, their sources, characteristics, merits, limitations and pro- 
duction into fabric; the hy genie aspects, use and care of fabrics. 

124. History of Costume. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly CTA 1824) 

A study of the history of costume from ancient to modern times. 

125. History of Textiles. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study into the historic background of textiles from ancient civilization 

to present day. 

321. Family Clothing Construction. Credit 4(1-6) 

(Formerly CTA 1821) 
Fundamental principles of clothing construction based on the use of the 
commercial pattern. A consideration of the clothing needs of family 
members with laboratory experiences to meet individual needs. Prerequisite: 
CTA 122. 

323. Home Crafts. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly CTA 1843) 
Instruction in crafts and accessories for the home, including draperies, 
curtains, cornices, valances, swags, covers for chairs, tables, lampshades, 
bedspreads, rugs, and needlepoint. 

422. Dress Design and Pattern Study. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly CTA 1822) 

A study of fiat pattern making and variations in commercial patterns. 

423. Advanced Clothing Construction. Credit 4(1-6) 
(Formerly CTA 1823) 

The application of art principles in creating dress designs by draping 
methods. Emphasis on the use of new fabrics and trends as creative ex- 
pression in clothing construction. 

424. Tailoring for Women. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly CTA 1844) 

A study of the principles of custom tailoring as they apply to women's 
coats and suits. Laboratory experiences in the construction of women's coats 
and suits. Prerequisite: CTA 423. 

426. Problems in Clothing, Textiles and Related Art. Credit 3(0-6) 

A or B 

(Formerly CTA 1826) Credit 3(0-6) 

Independent study on special problems in clothing, textiles or related 
art. 



56 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

521. Workroom Techniques in Clothing, Textiles or Related Art 

(Formerly CTA 1861) Credit 6(1-10) 

A course designed to give the student practical experiences in one of the 
areas of clothing, textiles or related art. 

522. Millinery. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1842) 

An introduction to the use of various millinery equipment and materials. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

620. Fashion Coordination. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly CTA 1870) 

A study of the factors which influence the fashion world; trends, de- 
signers, centers and promotion. Field trips to fashion centers. 

621. Seminar in Clothing, Textiles and Related Art. 

A or B Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly CTA 1871) 
A study of current trends in the field of Clothing, Textiles and Related 

Art. 

622. Economics of Clothing and Textiles. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly CTA 1872) 

A study of the economic aspects of clothing and household textiles as they 
relate to the needs and resources of families in their quest for maximum 
satisfaction and serviceability. 

623. Textile Chemistry. Credit 3(1-4) 
An introduction to the chemistry of the major classes of natural and 

man-made fibers, including their structure, properties, and reactions. 
Laboratory work will include consideration of chemical damage to fabrics, 
finishes and dyes. Prerequisites: Chemistry 104 and 105, Textiles 123. 

624. Advanced Textiles. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly CTA 1873) 

A study of the physical and chemical properties of textile fibers and 
fabrics with emphasis on recent scientific and technological developments. 

625. Experimental Clothing and Textiles. Credit 3(1-4) 

Experimentation with new woven fabrics and non-textiles such as furs, 
leathers, suedes. 

COURSES IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Undergraduate 

130. Food Preparation. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly F&N 1830) 
The application of scientific principles to food preparation and preserva- 
tion. Prerequisites: Chemistry 102 or 105, or concurrent. 

133. Family Food. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly F&N 1803) 
Principles of food preparation and nutrition; laboratory experiences in 
the selection, preparation, and serving of food to meet the nutritional needs 
of the family; role of diet in the maintenance of health and well being. 



School of Agriculture 57 

331. Meal Planning and Table Service. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly F&N 1831) 
Planning of meals with consideration of the economic and nutritional 
needs of all family members. Laboratory experiences provide opportunity 
to develop skill in the judgment and use of the more recent food products 
and equipment as time, money, and energy-saving measures. Prerequisite: 
F&N 130. 

337. Nutrition and Dietetics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly F&N 1827) 

The application of the scientific principles of nutrition to the planning 
of diets for various age groups. Prerequisites: Chemistry 102 or 105. 

338. Diet Therapy. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly F&N 1828) 

A study of dietary modifications necessary in the treatment of pathologic 
conditions. Prerequisite: F&N 337. 

436. Experimental Cookery. Credit 3(2-3) 
(Formerly F&N 1846) 

A study of the chemical and physical composition and behavior of food. 

437. Food and Nutrition in Early Childhood. Credit 3(2-2) 
Elementary principles of food and nutrition adapted to the needs of young 

children in home and group situations. 

439. Child Nutrition. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly F&N 1829) 
A study of the principles of nutrition and their application to the feeding 
of children in family and nursery school groups. 

535. Nutrition Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly F&N 1845) 
A course designed to assist in the development of nutrition education 
programs in the school and community. 

Advanced Undergraduate 

630. Advanced Nutrition. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly F&N 1880) 

Advanced discussion of the roles of vitamins, minerals, protein, fat, and 
carbohydrate in the body and their interrelationships. Prerequisites: F&N 
337 and Chemistry 251 or concurrent. 

636. Food Testing and Promotion. Credit 4(2-4) 

Recipe manipulation and testing; food demonstration techniques; food 
journalism and photography. 

637. Special Problems in Food and Nutrition. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly F&N 1877) 

Individualized work on special problems in food and nutrition. 

638. Recent Developments in Food and Nutrition. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly F&N 1878) 

A study of recent research in food and nutrition through discussion of 
reports in current scientific journals. 



58 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

639. Seminar in Food and Nutrition. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly F&N 1879) 
History of food and nutrition; past and present theories and methods; 
specialists and their contributions. 

Graduate 

731. Nutrition and Health. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly F&N 1888) 

Relation of essential nutrients to metabolism; evaluation of nutritional 
status. (Prerequisite: Food and Nutrition 337 or its equivalent.) 

732. Nutrition and Disease. Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly F&N 1889) 

Biochemistry of deficiency diseases; diet as a therapeutic tool. (Pre- 
requisite: Food and Nutrition 338 or its equivalent.) 

733. Nutrition During Growth and Development. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly F&N 1884) 

Nutritional needs of children, development of food habits, school lunch 
programs. 

734. Nutrition Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly F&N 1886) 

Interpretation of the results of nutrition research for use with lay groups. 
Preparation of teaching materials based on research for use in nutrition 
education programs. 

735. Experimental Foods. Credit 4(1-6) 
(Formerly F&N 1885) 

Objective and subjective evaluation of food; development and testing of 
recipes; experimentation with food. (Prerequisite: Food and Nutrition 436 
or its equivalent.) 

736. Research Methods in Food and Nutrition. Credit 4(2-6) 
(Formerly 1887) 

Experimental procedures in food and nutrition research; care of experi- 
mental animals; analysis of food, body fluids, animal tissues. (Prerequi- 
sites: Analytical Chemistry and Biochemistry.) 

739. Thesis Research. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly F&N 1899) 

Research problems in food and nutrition. 

Students would take advanced courses in journalism, statistics, chemistry, 
biology, and other areas related to food and nutrition to satisfy the needs 
of their chosen specialization. 

COURSES IN FOOD ADMINISTRATION 

Undergraduate 

344. Institution Organization and Management I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly IM 1924) 
A study of the organization, management and administration of food 
service establishments. 



School of Agriculture 59 

345. Institution Organization and Management II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly IM 1925) 

A continuation of IM 344 with emphasis on personnel management. 

346. Institution Purchasing. Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly IM 1946) 

A study of the problems involved in the purchase of food and other ex- 
pendable supplies for food service establishments. 

447. Institution Equipment. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly IM 1947) 

A study of the selection, care and use of equipment for quantity food 
preparation and service. Interpretation of blueprints and specifications will 
be considered. 

448. Quantity Cookery. Credit 4(1-6) 
(Formerly IM 1948) 

The application of the principles of cookery to the preparation and 
service of food for group feeding with emphasis on menu planning, work 
schedules, cost and portion control. Prerequisite: F&N 130. 

540. Catering. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly IM 1950) 

Designed to improve skill and technique in the preparation of specialty 
dishes and in planning, preparing and serving for entertainments. Con- 
sideration will be given to the foreign influence on gourmet cookery. Pre- 
requisite: F&N 130 or consent of instructor. 

544. Field Experience in Food Administration. Credit 2(0-6) 

(Formerly IM 1964) 

Individualized experiences in off-campus food service establishments. 

549. Advanced Quantity Cookery. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly IM 1949) 

Continuation of IM 448. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

645. Special Problems in Food Administration. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly IM 1975) 

Individual work on special problems in food administration. 

646. Readings in Food Administration. Credit 1(1-0) 

A study of food administration through reports and discussion of articles 
in current trade periodicals and scientific journals. 

647. Seminar in Food Administration. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly IM 1977) 

Discussion of problems involved in the organization and management of 
specialized food service areas. 



60 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Undergraduate 

101. Introduction to Home Economics. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly HEc 1801) 
A course designed to assist students in making personal adjustments to 
college living; an introduction to the broad areas of home economics; a 
study of the home economics curricula and professional opportunities in the 
field. 

104. The Individual and His Family. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly HEc 1804) 

A study of the interrelationships of the individual and his family through- 
out the life cycle with emphasis on health as it is related to the well-being 
of the family. 

105. Social Usage. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly HEc 1805) 

A course intended for the person who desires to enrich living with 
graciousness and accepted standards in our present day society. 

301. Health and Home Nursing. Credit 2(2-0) 

Principles and attitudes in home care of the sick, the handicapped, and 
the aged; prevention of illness and promotion of health; prenatal care; 
prevention of home accidents. 

400. Contemporary Housing. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly HEc 1920) 

A study of problems in house planning to meet family needs. Emphasis 
is placed on the study of house designs, methods of financing and location. 

401. Marriage and Family Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly HEc 1941) 

A study of the interpersonal relationships in contemporary family life; 
emphasis on the changing nature of family adjustments, goals, values, and 
roles. 

403. Consumer Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly HEc 1940) 
Basic principles involved in managing personal and family finances with 
emphasis on buying and consumption practices. 

500. Demonstration Techniques. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly HEc 1960) 

The application of demonstration techniques to all phases of home 
economics. 

502. Household Equipment. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly HEc 1942) 

The application of principles and techniques relating to selection, care 
and use of household equipment. 

503. Interior Design. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly HEc 1943) 

A study of residential interiors with emphasis on art principles and their 
relationship to furniture styles and accessories in decorating the home. 



School of Agriculture 61 

504. Home Furnishings. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly HEc 1944) 

A study of the problems in home furnishings with emphasis on the 
selection, care, use and practical ways of making the home attractive. 

505. Home Management Residence. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly HEc 1945) 

Designed to give students experiences in applying the principles of 
management and interpersonal relations to group living. Prerequisites: 
HEc 403 and F&N 331 or concurrent. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

602. Adult Education in Home Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly HEc 1972) 

An overview of adult homemaking education: organization, program 
planning, teaching techniques and evaluation. Laboratory experience will be 
provided by working with out-of-school groups. 

603. Special Problems in Home Economics I. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly HEc 1973) 

Problems in the various areas of home economics may be chosen for 
individual study. 

604. Seminar in Home Economics Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
Consideration of problems resulting from the impact of social change on 

the various fields of home economics in relation to the secondary school 
vocational homemaking programs. 

605. Home Economics Summer Study Abroad. Credit 6(0-12) 
(Formerly HEc 1975) 

A course designed to provide opportunity for students and specialists to 
study historic and contemporary points of interest abroad. Exposure to 
customs, cultures and industries in an international setting will provide 
the basis for broader background and experience in selected areas of home 
economics. 

Graduate 

706. Special Problems in Home Economics II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly HEc 1986) 
A study of research and major contemporary issues with consideration 
of their impact on trends and new directions in home economics. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Samuel J. Dunn, Chairman 

The program in this department are designed to give the students broad 
scientific and technical training which will enable them to take advantage 
of the many job opportunities available in these fields. There is considerable 
flexibility in the various programs to allow for a choice of electives which 
may better serve the individual needs of the students. 

The department offers training that is especially attractive to prospective 
majors who have aptitudes in science and technology and who desire to 
apply their training in the pursuit of careers in Modern Agricultural Science 
and Technology or to train further at the graduate level. 



62 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Majors in Agricultural Science or Agricultural Technology may elect 
options in (1) Agronomy with emphasis on Crop Science or Soil Science, 
(2) Horticulture, or (3) Agricultural Engineering by following the ap- 
propriate curriculum outlined in the catalog. 



PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE MAJORS 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 100 1 

English 101, 102 4 

Social Science 3 

Botany 140, Zoology 160 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 

Agricultural Education 101, 102 1 

Air or Military Science (optional) 1 

16 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

Agricultural Engineering 113; 

Animal Science 301 3 

Plant Science 110 

Poultry Science 317 

Health Education 2 

Air or Military Science (optional) 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 221 5 

Physics 211, 212 4 

Soil Science 338 — 

Economics 301 — 

*Electives (Major Area) 6 

Electives 3 



13 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 224 — 

Agricultural Economics 330 3 

Bacteriology 121 4 

*Electives (Major Area) 9 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



12 



16 



15 



"The 30 credits required as major electives are to be taken such that: 12 credits are 
elected from supporting courses; 18 credits are elected from the area of concentration with 
approval of the advisor. 



School of Agriculture 63 

Supporting Courses 

Mechanical Engineering- 101, 102 300; Mathematics 211, 222. 
Bacteriology 421; Botany 430, 433, 530; Chemistry 221, 222, 331, 441, 442. 
Zoology 461, 466, 561; Agricultural Economics 332; Chemistry 222, 251. 
Economics 302, 401, 501, 415, 310; Mathematics 221, 222. 

COURSES IN PLANT SCIENCE 
Undergraduate 

110. Plant Science I. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1400) 
An introduction to the basic principles underlying the production of 
economic crops. (Prerequisite Bot. 1507.) 

300. Plant Science II. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Plant Science 1420) 
History, classification, culture and utilization of economic plants; basic 
physical, economical and social conditions relating to their growth, distri- 
bution and improvement. (Prerequisite PI. Sc. 338.) 

520. Seminar in Plant Science and Technology. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly 1460) 
Current problems in Plant Science and Technology. Designed especially 
for unifying the three major areas of the department by involving both the 
staff and junior and senior students. 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Undergraduate 

113. Basic and Graphics Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 
Lettering, use of instruments, multi-view projection drawing, auxiliary 

projection, selection views and dimensioning, and basic structural drawing 
to include the phases of working drawings. 

114. Agricultural Construction and Maintenance. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1404) 

Selection, sharpening, care and correct use of shop tools and equipment; 
woodwork and simple carpentry; sheet metal work; elementary forge work; 
electric arc and oxyacetylene welding; pipe fitting and simple plumbing 
repairs. 

303. Field Machinery. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1423) 

Principles, operation, adjustment and maintenance of farm field machinery. 

304. Structures and Environment. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1424) 

Fundamentals of building construction, applied to location, selection of 
materials, foundations and planning farm structures. (Prerequisite Ag. 
Engr. 113.) 

401. Surveying, Drainage, and Soil Conservation. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 1441) 
Principles of surveying, drainage, planning of soil erosion and drainage 
systems, based on topographical and soil requirements, and soil conserva- 
tion practices. (Prerequisites Soil Sc. 338; Math. 111.) 



64 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

102. Farm Power. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly 1442) 
Principles of mechanical power, use, care and adjustment of internal 
combustion engines. (Prerequisite Physics 225.) 

522. Dairy Engineering. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1462) 

The general engineering principles of power selection, installation and 
maintenance, refrigeration and heat transfer as they apply to equipment 
used in the dairy industry. Also plant arrangement and management for 
dairy science majors. 

523. Electric Power. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1463) 

The study of electricity, electrical wiring, and electrical devices including 
motors, with particular emphasis upon the relation of these to the home 
and farm. (Prerequisite Physics 201, 225.) 

524. Water Supply and Sanitation for the Farm and Home. 

(Formerly 1464) Credit 3(1-4) 

The planning and installation of farm water and sanitation systems. 
(Prerequisites Ag. Engr. 113 and 114; Bact. 121.) 

525. Farm Shop Organization and Management. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1465) 

A course designed for prospective and in-service teachers of vocational 
agriculture; includes presentation of purpose, plans and equipment of shops, 
organization of course of study and methods of teaching. (Prerequisites Ag. 
Engr. 114; Ag. Ed. 501.) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

600. Conservation, Drainage and Irrigation. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1475) 

Improvement of soil by use and study of conservation practices, engi- 
neering structures, drainage, and irrigation systems. (Prerequisite Ag. 
Engr. 401.) 

601. Advanced Farm Shop. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1476) 

Care, operation and maintenance of farm shop power equipment. (Prereq- 
uisite Ag. Engr. 114.) 

602. Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 1477) 

Special work in Agricultural Engineering on problems of special interest 
to the student. Open to seniors in Agricultural Engineering. 

COURSES IN CROP SCIENCE 
Undergraduate 

307. Forage Crops. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1427) 
Grasses, legumes and other plans and their uses as hay, pasture, silage 
and special purpose of forages, identification of plants and seeds and study 
of quality in hay, silage and pasture population. (Prerequisite Plant Science 
110.) 



School of Agriculture 65 

405. Determining Crop Quality. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly 1445) 
The recognition of high quality crop products as influenced by growth 
and maturity factors, weeds and diseases, determination of commercial 
quality through study land use and grades; identification of crops, planning 
crop exhibits. (Prerequisite Plant Science 300.) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

603. Plant Chemicals. 

(Formerly 1478) 
A study of the important chemical pesticides and growth regulators used 
in the production of economic plants. (Prerequisites Chem. 102 and PI. Sc. 
300.) 

604. Crop Ecology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1479) 

The physical environment and its influence on crops; geographical distri- 
bution of crops. 

605. Breeding of Crop Plants. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1480) 

Significance of crop improvements in the maintenance of crop yields; 
application of genetic principles and techniques used in the improvement 
of crops; the place of seed certification in the maintenance of verietal purity. 

606. Special Problems in Crops. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1481) 

Designed for students who desire to study special problems in crops. 
Repeatable for a maximum of six credits. By consent of instructor. 

607. Research Design and Analysis. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1482) 

Experimental designs, methods and techniques of experimentation; ap- 
plication of experimental design to plant and animal research; interpreta- 
tion of experimental data. (Prerequisite Ag. Econ. 644, Math. 224.) 

COURSES IN EARTH SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

309. Elements of Physical Geology. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1429) 
Relation of geologic principles in the development of a balanced concept 
of the earth and earth history; identification of rocks and minerals; weather- 
ing, water and mineral resources; sediments, metamorphosis and volcanism; 
land forms. (Prerequisites Chem. 101 or consent of instructor.) 

330. Elements of Weather and Climate. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1430) 
A study of the fundamental elements of weather conditions as revealed 
in world patterns of climatic types. This course surveys the types of land 
forms and make applications to problems in engineering, military science 
and in planning for agricultural, urban and regional development projects. 
(Prerequisites E. Sc. 309; Soil Sc. 338, or consent of instructor.) 



66 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

408. Aerial Photointerpretation. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Earth Science 343) 
The interpretation of aerial photography as an aid to the study of terrains 
of all types. This course surveys the types of land forms and makes ap- 
plications to problems in engineering-, military science and in planning for 
agricultural, urban and regional developmental projects. (Prerequisites 
Ea. Sc. 1429; Soil Sc. 1438 or consent of instructor.) 

COURSES IN HORTICULTURE 

Undergraduate 

118. Amateur Floriculture. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1408) 
General principles of growing flowers on a small scale in small green- 
houses, home, school and public buildings; growing flowers outside for 
landscape effect and cutting. 

334. Plant Propagation. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1434) 

Study of types, construction, and management of propagation structures; 
fundamental principles of propagation by seed, cuttage, budding, grafting, 
and layerage. (Prerequisite PI. Sc. 110.) 

335. Principles of Landscape Design. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1433) 

Fundamentals of design of planning the arrangement of small properties, 
such as homes, schools, small parks and playgrounds. 

514. Nursery Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 1454) 
Planning, operations and methods used by wholesale, retail, and landscape 
nurseries. Emphasis on cultural practices, records and selling techniques. 
(Prerequisite Hort. 334.) 

527. Basic Floral Design. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 1467) 

Essentials of flower arrangement and plant decorations for the home, 
office, hospital, school and church. 

528. Flower Shop Management. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1468) 

Designing, planning, handling of merchandise, buying and selling methods, 
and general policies. 

529. Landscape Design and Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 1469) 

Problems in design of land areas with emphasis on orientation, arrange- 
ment, and circulation. Instruction in planning, presentation, cost accounting, 
and construction. (Prerequisites Hort. 335; Ag. Engr. 113.) 

530. Landscape Design and Construction. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 1470) 

Continuation of Hort. 530. Problems in design of larger land areas in- 
volving more complex features; practice in landscape model construction. 
(Prerequisite Hort. 529.) 



School of Agriculture 67 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

608. Special Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1483) 
Work along special lines given largely by the project method for advanced 
undergraduate and graduate students who have the necessary preparation. 

610. Commercial Greenhouse Production. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1449) 

Culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse and out-of-doors with 
emphasis on out flowers and outside bedding plants. Special attention 
given to seasonal production. (Prerequisite Hort. 334.) 

611. Commercial Greenhouse Production. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1450) 

Culture of floriculture crops in the greenhouse with emphasis on pot 
plant and conservatory plants. Special attention given to seasonal produc- 
tion. (Prerequisite Hort. 334.) 

612. Plant Materials and Landscape Maintenance. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1452) 

Identification, merits, adaptability, and maintenance of shrubs, trees, and 
vines used in landscape planting trees, shrubs, bulbs, and perennials. (Pre- 
requisite Hort. 334, 335.) 

613. Plant Materials and Planning Design. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 1453) 

Continuation of Hort. 512 with added emphasis on plant combinations 
and use of plants as design elements. (Prerequisite Hort. 512.) 

COURSES IN SOIL SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

338. Fundamentals of Soil Science. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly 1438) 
The fundamental nature and properties of soils and introductory treat- 
ment of soil genesis, morphology, and classification and land use. 

516. Soil Pedology. Credit 3(3-0) 
Factors and processes in soil formation and the general principles upon 

which the classification of soils is based. This course will be offered during 
the fall terms of odd numbered years, beginning in 1967. (Prerequisites: 
Soil Science 338 and Chemistry 102.) 

517. Soil Fertility. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 1457) 

General principles of fertility; the physical, chemical, and biological 
factors affecting soil fertility, crop production, conservation cropping, and 
crop rotations. (Prerequisites Soil Sc. 338; Chem. 101 or consent of 
instructor.) 

518. Soil Fertility Laboratory. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 1458) 

Analytical and diagnostic procedures in studying soil fertility problems. 
(Prerequisites Chem. 102; Soil Sc. 338 and 517 or consent of instructor.) 



68 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



532. Soil Physics. Credit 4(2-4) 

A study of the influence of mineralogical composition and texture, and 
temperature, aeration and moisture relations of the soil on its physical 
condition. This course will be offered during the spring terms or even 
numbered years, beginning in 1968. (Prerequisites: Soil Science 517, Chem- 
istry 102, Mathematics 113, and Physics 225.) 



533. 



Credit 4(2-4) 



Soil Genesis and Classification. 

(Formerly 1473) 
Soil genesis, morphology and classification of the major soil groups of the 
United States; techniques of making and using soil surveys. (Prerequisites: 
Soil Sc. 336 and 516.) 

534. Soil Chemistry. Credit 4(2-4) 

Application of physico-chemical principles to soil studies including crys- 
tal structure, types of bonding, nutrient fixation, ionic equilibria and 
electrode. (Prerequisites: Chem. 102, Soils 338, and the consent of the 
instructor.) This course will be taught during the Spring Semester of years 
ending with an odd number. 



ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE 

609. Special Problems in Soils. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1484) 
Research problems in soils for advanced students. (By consent of in- 
structor.) 



GRADUATE COURSE IN CROP SCIENCE 



702. Grass Land Ecology. 

(Formerly 1491) 



Credit 3(3-0) 



GRADUATE COURSES IN EARTH SCIENCE 



704. Problem Solving in Earth Science. 

(Formerly 1493) 

705. The Physical Universe. 

(Formerly 1494) 

706. Physical Geology. 

(Formerly 1495) 

708. Conservation of Natural Resources. 

(Formerly 1496) 



Credit 3(0-6) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 



GRADUATE COURSE IN SOILS 



710. Soils of North Carolina. 

(Formerly Soils 1499) 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 




SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Arthur F. Jackson, Dean 

The School of Arts and Sciences is concerned primarily with providing 
experiences which seek to develop a student's ability to engage in analytical 
and critical inquiry, and with the enlargement of a student's understanding 
of the significant accomplishments of the human mind as they may be 
viewed in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. The 
objectives of this school are: 

1. to provide courses of instruction to all students of the University in 
general or basic education; 

2. to provide formal instruction in breadth and in depth in specific cur- 
riculum areas; 

3. to provide experiences which seek to develop the student's ability to 
engage in analytical and critical thought; 

4. to provide activities which allow the student to acquire knowledge 
concerning the significant accomplishments in the humanities, social 
sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics; and 

5. to provide the opportunity for individual creativity and development 
through undergraduate participation in research activities and special 
problems. 

These objectives are reached via the provision of courses of study which 
require each student to experience a wide range of general education 
subjects. The School allows the student to gain in-depth experiences in a 
specific discipline through specific major sequences. To that end, the School 
offers majors in Art, Biology, Chemistry, Economics, English, French, 
History, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Political Science, Social Studies, 
Social Service, Sociology and Speech and Dramatic Arts. A Bachelor of 
Science degree is offered in each of these areas. Many degree programs may 
be pursued jointly with Professional Education courses (offered by the 
School of Education) which qualify graduates for certification to teach in 
the secondary schools. In addition, the Physics and Mathematics Depart- 
ments provide joint degree curricula in Engineering Physics and Engineer- 
ing Mathematics, respectively, with the School of Engineering. 

The School of Arts and Sciences, together with other Schools of the 
University, seeks to stimulate and guide young people into constructive 
intellectual and social maturity. This function is carried through by many 
associations in the classroom, the laboratory, the seminar, and the con- 
ference. In addition to its promulgation of the vital process of teaching 
through dynamic communication, the School of Arts and Sciences places high 
importance on its role to provide the University with a depository of knowl- 
edge. In keeping with this purpose, the School fosters special library 
collections; it operates the University Art Gallery; it serves as the main 
fostering source for the Center for African and Afro-American Studies, and 
it provides significant experiences in the performing arts for students whose 
talents may be displayed and developed through the several curricula of the 
School. 

In order to stimulate academic excellence in many of the subject matter 
areas of the School's curricula, honorary societies appropriate to these 

70 



School of Arts and Sciences 71 

areas of concenration exist on the campus. Recognition for academic 
achievement holds a significant place in the on-going program of the School 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Admission requirements for the School of Arts and Sciences are the same 
as those for the University. Requirements for graduation vary from de- 
partment to department so the student must satisfy departmental require- 
ments. 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 



• DEPARTMENT OF ART 

• DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

• DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

• DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



• DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND 
THEATER ARTS 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 

LeRoy F. Holmes, Jr., Chairman 

Beginning with the belief that human beings are creative; this creative 
impulse can serve human needs, and that an art curriculum can motivate 
and nourish the development of creative ability, the art curricula seek to 
embrace and utilize both functional and experimental approaches in the de- 
velopment of that creative ability. This philosophy is reflected in three 
areas of concentration — Art Education, Design, Painting, and also in the 
elective offerings in art appreciation, art history, and studio arts. 

The objectives of the Department of Art are simple and direct; to guide 
the student through carefully planned classroom, studio, and working ex- 
periences, to develop his aesthetic perceptivity, technical competency, and 
to broaden in general education. 

The four-year programs leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree in Art 
are designed to integrate studio major courses and academic courses. The 
fundamentals of art coupled with courses outside the area of art enrich and 
broaden the comprehension of creative experience and lay a foundation for 
appreciation, production, and teaching of those elements of human ex- 
perience and expression known as the Fine Arts. 



PROGRAM IN ART EDUCATION 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Art 100, 101 3 

English 100, 101 4 

Education 100 1 

Personal Hygiene 200 — 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

Physical Education 1 

History 100, 101 3 

Electives or ROTC 1 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 

4 



16 



17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Art 224, 225 2 

Art 226, 227 3 

Education 300, 301 2 

Foreign Language (French or German) 3 

Humanities 200-201 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Electives or ROTC 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

2 

3 
2 
3 
3 



18 



15 



73 



74 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Art 229 — 

Art 400 2 

Art 401 3 

Art 405 3 

Biological Science 100 — 

Education 400 — 

Speech 250 — 

Physical Science 100 4 

Electives 3 

15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Art 454 3 

Art 459 2 

Art 520 2 

Art 524 3 

Art 600 3 

Education 500 — 

Education 525 — 

Education 560 — 

Psychology 436 3 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



12 



PROGRAM IN DESIGN 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Art 100, 101 3 

Art 224, 225 2 

Education 100 1 

English 100, 101 4 

Personal Hygiene 200 — 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101 3 

Electives or ROTC 1 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
2 



4 
2 
3 
3 

1 

18 



School of Arts and Sciences 75 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Art 222 — 3 

Art 226, 227 3 3 

Art 229 — 3 

Biological Science 100 — 4 

Engineering Graphics 101 2 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Physical Science 100 4 — 

Electives or ROTC 3 2 

15 18 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Art 228 — 3 

Art 400 2 — 

Art 401, 402 3 3 

Foreign Language (French or German) 3 3 

Electives 5 3 

13 15 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Art 459 2 — 

Art 520, 526 2 3 

Art 524, 525 3 3 

Art 405, 406 3 3 

Art 455, 456 3 3 

Electives 3 — 

16 12 



PROGRAM IN PAINTING 



Freshman Year 

Same as freshman year for Design Major. 



Sophomore Year 

Same as sophomore year for Design Major. 



76 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Art 228 — 

Art 400 2 

Art 401, 402 3 

Art 405, 406 3 

Foreign Language (French or German) 3 

Electives 4 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 
Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and N 'umber Credit 

Art 459 2 

Art 520 2 

Art 524, 525 3 

Art 528, 529 3 

Electives 3 



15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



13 



13 



COURSES IN ART 



Undergraduate 

100. Basic Drawing and Composition. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly Art 3200) 
A study of the fundamental principles of drawing as a mode of visual ex- 
pression. Selected problems involving basic consideration of line, form, 
space and composition are presented for analysis and laboratory practice. 



101. 



Credit 3(0-6) 



Lettering and Poster Design. 

(Formerly Art 3201) 
A comprehensive study of the art of lettering. Projects involving the 
principles of layout, poster construction, and general advertising. 



220. 



Credit 2(0-4) 



Graphic Presentation I. 

(Formerly 3220) 
Exercises in various sketching techniques and media, including work with 
pencil, charcoal, crayon, and ink. Individual instruction is given using forms 
in nature and still life for art and architectural presentation. Prerequisite: 
Sophomore Classification. 



221. 



Credit 2(0-4) 



Graphic Presentation II. 

(Formerly 3221) 
The theory of color mixture. Individual instruction in the techniques of 
watercolor painting for architectural presentation. Studies from nature and 
still-life. Prerequisite: Art 220. 



222. 



Watercolor. 

(Formerly Art 3222) 
Experimental exploration of all aqueous media: watercolor 
gouache their possibilities and limitations. 



Credit 3(0-6) 



casein, 



• School of Arts and Sciences 77 

224. Art Appreciation. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Art 3224) 

An introduction to the study of art. Basic qualities of various forms of 
artistic expression are explained. Emphasis is placed on the application 
of art principles in every day life. 

225. An Introduction to the History of Art. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Art 3225) 

A general introduction to the history of art, beginning with an examina- 
tion of ancient art in terms of their extant monuments and culminating with 
the analysis and comparison of representative works of today. 

226. Design I. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3226) 

An introduction to visual design based upon an analysis of the aims, 
elements, principles, sources of design and their application in a variety of 
media. 

227. Design II. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3227) 

A continuation of Art 226 with consideration given to three dimensional 
as well as two dimensional problems. Students are encouraged in the experi- 
mental use of materials and are required to find individual and complete 
solutions to problems through various stages of research, planning, and 
presentation. Emphasis is placed on technical perfection and the develop- 
ment of professional attitudes. 

228. Color Theory. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3228) 

Problems directed toward understanding of color through creative experi- 
ment and application of color in visual organization. Use of slides, filmstrips, 
and trips. 

229. Anatomy and Figure Drawing. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3229) 

A study of the human figure with emphasis on anatomy, body structure 
and proportions, draped figures at rest and in action. Special emphasis is 
given to detailed studies, composition, and stylization. 

400. Renaissance Art. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Art 3240) 

The study of the Renaissance in Italy and in major regions of northern 
and western Europe from 1300 to 1600. 

401. Ceramics. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3241) 

Introduction to basic techniques and processes of making ceramics. The 
student is taught hand building, slip casting, one piece molds, wheel throw- 
ing, decorating, glazing, and firing. Supplementary reading is required. 

402. Basic Sculpture. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3242) 

Introduction to sculptural form with the use of clay modeling, basic 
plaster techniques, wood, and metal in relation to the production of 
sculpture. 



78 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

403. Jewelry and Metalwork. Credit 3(0-6) 

(Formerly 3243) 
The design and technical essentials of jewelry making and metalwork. 
Prerequisites: Art 226, 227. 

405. Materials and Techniques. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3245) 

A study of the materials of the artist; supports, grounds, vehicles, binders, 
and protective covering. Exploration of the possibilities of various tech- 
niques of picture construction as a point or departure for individual ex- 
pression. 

406. Painting Techniques. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3246) 

A continuation of 3245 with further work in projects that explore the 
esthetic opportunities and problems implicit in the use of varying media. 
Work in tempera, gouache, casein, polymers and lacquers. 

450. Advertising Design I. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3250) 

The study of basic tools of advertising design. Students are introduced 
to lettering techniques, layout problems, and reproduction processes for 
advertising, illustrations, posters, and television. 

451. Advertising Design II. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3251) 

Preparation and rendering of art work for reproduction from rough idea 
layouts to finished illustration. Creative and technical class work is aug- 
mented by visits to commercial studios and printing companies. Prerequisite: 
Art 450. 

452. Commercial Art. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3252) 

Illustration techniques. Different materials and renderings employed in 
advertising illustration, such as airbrush, colored inks, scratch board, etc. 
Attention is given to techniques of printing in as far as they affect graphic 
design. 

453. Typography. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3253) 

The study of typography in relation to lettering, advertising, and design. 
Prerequisites: Art 101 and 450. 

454. General Crafts. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3254) 

Introduction to craft processes, weaving, metalwork, leather, etc. 

455. Fabric Design and Basic Weaving. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3255) 

Basic principles of design as related to textiles and other flat surface 
decoration. The warping, threading, and weaving on small looms. History of 
fabric design and weaving. Prerequisites: Art 226, 227. 

456. Fabric Painting and Weaving. Credit 3(0-6) 
The emphasis is on printing techniques and designers' tools to achieve 

effective results and on the use of the large looms for creating interesting 
fabrics. Study of contemporary trends in weaving. Prerequisites: Art 226, 
227, 455. 



School of Arts and Sciences 79 

457. Stage Design and Marionette Production I. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3257) 

Problems in scene design and stage settings with experiments in stage 
lighting. Attention is given to the designing and construction of marionettes 
for simple plays. Field trips and attendance at plays are required. 

458. Stage Design and Marionette Production II. Credit 3(0-6) 
A continuation of 457. 

459. Baroque and Rococo Art. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Art 3259) 
The study of art in Europe from 1600 to 1800. 

520. Modern Art. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Art 3260) 
European and American art from about 1875 to the present. 

524. Introduction to Graphic Arts. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3264) 

Introduction to printmaking processes. Production of prints in varied 
media: linoleum, woodcuts, drypoint, etchings, serigraphs, and lithographs. 

525. Lithography and Serigraphy. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3265) 

Exploration of the techniques of lithography and serigraphy as a means 
of contemporary artistic expression. Emphasis of medium determined by 
individual interest. 

526. Senior Project. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 3266) 

Students who have given evidence of their ability to do serious individual 
work on a professional level may plan and carry out a project of his own 
choosing, subject to approval and supervision of a faculty member. 

528. Painting I. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3268) 

Creative painting in various media with emphasis on a modern approach 
and handling of medium. Research and experience in contemporary trends: 
abstract, non-objective, and abstract expressionism. 

529. Painting II. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Art 3269) 

Development of the student as a professional artist; advance research and 
familiarization with contemporary trends, concepts, forms, and symbols. 
Emphasis on an original contemporary statement. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

600. Public School Art. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Art 3270) 
Study of materials, methods, and procedures in teaching art in public 
schools. Special emphasis is placed on selection and organization of 
materials, seasonal projects, lesson plan. 



80 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

602. Seminar in Art History. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Art 3272) 

Investigation in depth of the background influences which condition 
stylistic changes in art forms by analyzing and interpreting works of 
representative personalities. 

603. Studio Techniques. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Art 3273) 

Demonstrations that illustrate and emphasize the technical potentials of 
varied media. These techniques are analyzed and discussed as a point of 
departure for individual expression. 

604. Ceramic Workshop. Credit 2(0-2) 
(Formerly Art 3274) 

Advanced studio problems and projects in ceramics with emphasis on 
independent creative work. The student is given opportunity for original 
research and is encouraged to work toward the development of a personal 
style in the perfection of technique. 

605. Printmaking. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Art 3275) 

Investigation of traditional and experimental methods in printmaking. 
Advanced studio problems in woodcut etching, lithography, and serigraphy. 

606. Sculpture. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Art 3276) 

Further study of sculpture with an expansion of techniques. Individual 
problems for advanced students. 

607. Project Seminar. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Art 3277) 

Advanced specialized studies in creative painting, design, and sculpture. 
By means of discussion and suggestions, this seminar intends to solve 
various problems which might arise in each work. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor. 

608. Arts and Crafts. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 3278) 

Creative experimentation with a variety of materials, tools, and pro- 
cesses: projects in wood, metal, jewelry making, wood and metal construc- 
tion, fabric design, leather craft, puppet making, and paper sculpture. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

John O. Crawford, Acting Chairman 

The English Department assumes three responsibilities in the educational 
program of the institution. First, by means of composition courses, intro- 
ductory courses in literature, and laboratory courses, the department at- 
tempts to develop among the students the language skills required for 
intelligent communication. Second, the department provides the necessary 
information and training for prospective teachers of English. Third, the 
department offers the English majors a foundation of information and of 
knowledge of techniques which will enable them to pursue graduate study 
effectively. 



School of Arts and Sciences 



81 



MAJOR PROGRAMS IN ENGLISH 

The department offers courses in English language and literature, de- 
velopmental reading, and the humanities. A major is offered in English. 
One may pursue a nonteaching major in the department, as the schedules 
of programs on the following pages indicate. A minor is also offered in 
English. 

All English majors are required to study a foreign language through 
the intermediate courses. If a student has studied a foreign language for 
two years in high school, he may enroll in the intermediate course when 
he begins the language study at the University. Such a student would be 
required to complete only one year of foreign language study at the 
University. 



SUGGESTED SEQUENCE FOR ENGLISH MAJORS 
TEACHING PROGRAM 

Freshman Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Physical Science 100 — 

Physical Education 101, 103 or 102, 104 1 

Education 100 1 

Air or Military Science or Electives 1 

English 102 (either semester) 1 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 

3 

4 
1 



18 



16 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

*Foreign Language 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Education 300 — 

Health Education 200 2 

Speech 250 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

English 210, 401 3 

English 220, 221 3 

Air or Military Science or Electives 2 



Si>ring Semester 
Credit 



19 



18 



*Acceptable courses: French 300-301; Spanish 320-321; German 422-423. Eligibility to 
enroll in any one of these sequences is established by placement test or by successful com- 
pletion of elementary level of appropriate language. 



82 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 301, 400 2 

History 405 3 

Foreign Language or Electives 3 

English 300, 501 3 

English 430, 431 3 

English 436, 410 3 

Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



20 



18 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Psychology 436 3 

English 435 3 

English 450 3 

English 455 3 

English 500 3 

English 510 2 

English 550 1 

Education 500 — 

Education 526 — 

Education 560 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



12 



NON-TEACHING MAJOR 

Freshman Year 

Same as freshman year for Teaching Program. 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

^Foreign Language 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

English 210 3 

Speech 250 — 

History 405 — 

Psychology 320 3 

English 220, 221 3 

Health Education 200 — 

Air or Military Science 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 

2 
3 

3 
2 
2 



17 



18 



♦Acceptable courses: French 300-301; Spanish 320-321; German 422-423. Eligibility to 
enroll in any one of these sequences is established by placement test or by successful com- 
pletion of elementary level of appropriate language. 



School of Arts and Sciences 



83 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 300, 501 3 

English 430, 431 3 

Foreign Language or Electives 3 

English 400, 401 3 

Electives 3 

Humanities 420 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



18 



18 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 450, 410 3 

English 435 3 

English 436 3 

English 550 1 

Electives 5 

English 500, 455 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



15 



THE TEACHING MINOR 

Because most students who study in a minor field hope to be able to 
teach in that field if they should be unable to secure a job in their primary 
interest, the minor program is intended to furnish the student with a 
minimum foundation for the teaching of English in the junior or senior 
high school. 

Course requirements (28 hours): English 210 (3), 220 (3), 221 (3), 300 
(3), 410 (3), 430 (3), 431 (3), 450 (3), 501 (3), and 550 (1). 

Sophomore Year 



Course and Number 

English 210 

English 220, 221 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



Junior Year 



Course and Number 

English 410, 300 
English 430, 431 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 



84 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Senior Year 



Course and Number 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



English 450 3 

English 501 3 

English 550 1 



THE NON-TEACHING MINOR 
(Same as the Teaching Minor) 

The scope of the English major curriculum often prevents a student 
from pursuing a minor; consequently, the Department recommends "strong 
electives" which may pattern in some of the following concentrations: 

Foreign Language 

French 400 Phonetics 

French 410 Oral French 

French 415 Survey of Literature I 

French 505 Advanced Composition 

Music and Art 

Music 403 History and Appreciation 

Music 405 Baroque and Romantic Periods 

Art 224 Art Appreciation 

Art 400 Renaissance Art 

Social Science 

History 205 United States Since 1865 

History 206 Africa South of the Sahara 

Sociology 204 Social Problems 

Sociology 306 Minority Problems 

Library Science 

Education 410 Organization and Administration of School Libraries 

Education 411 Cataloging and Classification 

Education 412 School Library Reference Materials 

Education 413 Non-Book Materials 

Education 414 Reading Interest 

Education 415 Techniques of Librarianship 



COURSES IN ENGLISH 



Freshman English 

100. Freshman Composition I. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly English 2401) 
An introduction to oral and written communication; provides the student 
with experience in writing short compositions, outlining written material, 
improving reading, speaking skills. 



School of Arts and Sciences 85 

101. Freshman Composition II. Credit 4(4-0) 
(Formerly English 2402) 

A continuation of English 100 which provides the student with additional 
experience in expository writing, with intensive instruction in descriptive, 
argumentative writing, narrative composition; introduces student to the 
techniques of investigative writing and to the skills of reading different 
literary genres; provides opportunities for additional experience in oral 
expression. Prerequisite: English 100. 

102. Developmental Reading. Credit 1(2-0) 
(Formerly English 2403) 

Instruction and practice in methods of increasing rate of reading and 
techniques of comprehending written material; emphasis upon vocabulary 
study and study skills. Limited registration. 

Language and Composition 

300. Advanced Composition. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2440) 
A study of techniques of narrative, descriptive, expository, and argu- 
mentative composition. Prerequisite: English 101. 

450. Advanced English Grammar. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2441) 
An intensive study of the structure of the English language with tolerance 
towards language dialects and levels as effective communication; emphasis 
placed upon a knowledge of grammar essential to teaching English in the 
junior and senior high school. Prerequisite: English 101. 

455. Journalism. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly English 2442) 
Theoretical and practical work in gathering, organizing, and writing 
news; primary attention to the development of journalistic technique. Pre- 
requisite: English 101. 

500. Literary Research. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2461) 

OPEN ONLY TO JUNIOR AND SENIOR ENGLISH MAJORS AND 

MINORS. 

Advanced study in the tools and techniques of literary research and 
investigation; emphasizes independent study and culminates in the com- 
pletion of a study of a problem in literature. 

501. Introduction to the History of the English Language. 

(Formerly English 2462) Credit 3(3-0) 

A course designed to develop the student's understanding of modern 

English syntax, vocabulary, etymology, spelling, pronunciation, and usage 

and to increase the student's comprehension of English literature of 

previous centuries through a study of the history of the language. 

510. Reading Skills. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2463) 

Open to senior English majors and minors. 

A course designed to orient students to the scope of higher-level reading 
skills and to the problems involved in promoting increased efficiency in 
reading of secondary school pupils. 



86 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Literature 

210. Introduction to Literary Studies. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2436) 
Required of English majors and minors in the sophomore year; open to 
others only with approval of instructor; the critical analysis, literary 
criticism, investigative and bibliographical techniques necessary to advanced 
study in English. This course is a prerequisite for all advanced courses in 
literature. Prerequisite: English 101. 

220. English Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2437) 

A survey of the literary movements and major authors of English litera- 
ture in relation to the cultural history of England, from Beowulf to 1700. 
Prerequisite: English 101, History 100-101. 

221. English Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2438) 

A continuation of English 220 from 1700-1914. Prerequisite: English 101, 
History 100-101. 

400. Survey of Dramatic Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2450) 

A survey course in the history, literature, criticism, and arts of the 
theatre to the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: English 210. 

401. Survey of Dramatic Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2451) 

A continuation of English 400, from the nineteenth century to the 
present. Prerequisite: English 210. 

410. Shakespeare. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2452) 
An introduction to a study of the works of William Shakespeare through 
a detailed examination of representative works selected from the major 
periods of his development as a dramatist. Prerequisite: English 210. 

430. American Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2455) 

A study of the literary movements and major authors of American 
literature in relation to the cultural history of America from the Colonial 
Period to 1865. Prerequisite: English 210, Humanities 200-201. 

431. American Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2456) 

A continuation of English 430, from 1865-1914. Prerequisite English 210, 
Humanities 200-201. 

435. The Novel. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2457) 

A study of the novel as an art form, with attention to significant English 
and American novelists from 1750 to the present. Prerequisite: English 210. 

436. Modern Poetry. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2458) 

A study of the poetry as an art form, with attention to significant 
English and American poets of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: English 
210. 



School of Arts and Sciences 87 

550. Senior Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly English 2469) 
A discussion of problems in literature and composition. Required of senior 
English majors and minors. Prerequisite: 21 hours of English above 
English 101 and including English 210. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

603. Introduction to Folklore. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2498) 
Basic introduction to the study and appreciation of folklore. (Cross listed 
as Anthropology 603.) 

620. Elizabethan Drama. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2471) 

Chief Elizabethan plays, tracing the development of dramatic forms 
from early works to the close of the theaters in 1642. Prerequisite: English 
210, 220-221. 

621. Grammar and Composition for Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2472) 

A course designed to provide a review of the fundamentals of grammar 
and composition for the elementary or secondary school teacher. (Not 
accepted for credit toward undergraduate or graduate concentration in 
English.) 

626. Children's Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2476) 
A study of the types of literature designed especially for students in 
the upper levels of elementary school and in junior high school. (Not 
accepted for credit toward undergraduate or graduate concentration in 
English.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or English 101, Humanities 
200-201. 

628. The American Novel. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2478) 

A history of the American novel from Cooper to Faulkner. Melville, 
Twain, Howells, James, Dreiser, Lewis, Hawthorne, Faulkner, and Heming- 
way will be included. Prerequisite: English 210. 

629. The Negro Writer in American Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of prose, poetry, and drama by American authors of Negro 

ancestry. Their works will be studied in relation to the cultural and literary 
traditions of their times. Dunbar, Chestnutt, Johnson, Cullen, Bontempts, 
Hughes, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, and Yerby will be included. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or English 101, Humanities 200-201. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. 

700. Literary Analysis and Criticism. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2485) 
An introduction to intensive textual analysis of poetry, prose fiction, 
prose non-fiction, and drama. A study of basic principles and practices in 
literary criticism and of the various schools of criticism from Plato to 
Eliot. 



88 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

702. Milton. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2486) 
A study of the works of Milton in relation to the cultural and literary 
trends of seventeenth-century England. Emphasis is placed upon Milton's 
poetry. 

704. Eighteenth Century English Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2487) 
A study of the major prose and poetry writers of the eighteenth century 
in relation to the cultural and literary trends. Dryden, Defoe, Swift, Fielding, 
Addison, Pope, Johnson, and Blake will be included. 

710. Language Arts for Elementary Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2488) 
A course designed to provide elementary school teachers with an op- 
portunity to discuss problems related to the language arts taught in the 
elementary school. (Not accepted for credit towards concentration in 
English.) 

720. Studies in American Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2489) 
A study of major American prose and poetry writers. 

750. Romantic Prose and Poetry of England. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2490) 

A study of nineteenth-century British authors whose works reveal 
characteristics of Romanticism. Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, 
Byron, Lamb, Carlyle, and De Quincey will be included. 

751. Modern British and Continental Fiction. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2491) 

A study of British and European novelists from 1914 until the present. 
Included in the study are Joyce, Kafka, Gide, Mann, and Camus. 

752. Restoration and 18th Century Drama. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2492) 

A study of the theatre and drama in relation to the cultural trends of 
the period. Etherege, Farquhar, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Fielding, Gay, Steele, 
Goldsmith, and Sheridan will be included. 

753. Literary Research and Bibliography. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2493) 

An introduction to tools and techniques used in investigation of literary 
subjects. 

754. History and Structure of the English Language. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2494) 

A study of the changes in the English language-syntax, vocabulary, 
spelling, pronunciation, and usage-form the fourteenth century through the 
twentieth century. 

755. Contemporary Practices in Gramar and Rhetoric. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2495) 

A course designed to provide secondary teachers of English with ex- 
periences in Linguistics applied to modern grammar and composition. 



School of Arts and Sciences 89 

770. Seminar. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2499) Prerequisite: 15 hours of graduate-level 
courses in English. 

Provides an opportunity for presentation and discussion of thesis, as well 
as selected library or original research projects from non-thesis candidates. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Waverlyn N. Rice, Chairman 

The program of the Department of Foreign Languages is based on the 
principle that ability to converse and understand people of other nations 
as well as a knowledge of one's own language, is basic to a democratic 
society. In view of this, the objectives are: 

1. To develop reasonable facility in the reading, listening, speaking, and 
writing of modern foreign languages. 

2. To develop a better knowledge of modern foreign cultures. 

3. To create a spirit of understanding that will result in proper attitude 
toward different national groups. 

4. To prepare students as teachers of foreign languages for employment 
in secondary schools. 

5. To encourage students who manifest linguistic ability to continue 
further study and research. 

The Department of Foreign Languages offers courses in French, Spanish, 
Russian, and German. A major is given in French (Teaching and Non- 
Teaching). A minor may be achieved in French and Spanish by students 
who complete a minimum of 21 semester hours in Spanish and 24 semester 
hours in French. 

Students who have completed one unit of high school language or who 
have no knowledge of a language are to enroll in an elementary language 
course. For those students presenting two units or more of high school 
credits, French 300, and French 301, or Spanish 320 and Spanish 321 are 
required. NOTE: No credit will be given to students taking elementary 
language courses if they have completed two units of a foreign language 
in high school. 

Suggested Sequence for French Major 

TEACHING PROGRAM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Sj>ring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 100, 101 3 3 

History (six hours) 100, 101, 105, 107, 109 3 3 

Biological Science 100 4 — 

Physical Science 100 — 4 

Education 100 1 — 

Physical Education 101 (102), 103 (104) 1 1 

^English 102 — 1 

16 16 

*For those freshmen who failed the Reading Test. 



90 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semestt 
Course and Number Credit 

English 250 2 

Education 300, 301 2 

French 300, 301 3 

French 410, 411 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Health Education 200 — 

Psychology 320 3 

Electives — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

French 415, 416 3 

French 400 — 

French 508 3 

French 505 or 506 3 

Education 400 3 

Psychology 436 — 

Electives 4 



16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 
Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

French Electives 6 

Electives 10 

Education 500 — 

Education 527 — 

Education 560 — 



16 



S]>ring Semester 
Credit 



16 12 

Minimum Total Hours required 124 

Minimum Total French Hours required 33 

Suggested Sequence for French Major 

NON-TEACHING PROGRAM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 100, 101 3 3 

History (six hours) 100, 101, 105, 107, 109 3 3 

Biological Science 100 4 — 

Physical Science — 4 

Education 100 1 — 

Physical Education 100 (102), 103 (104) 1 1 

♦English 102 — 1 

16 16 

*For those freshmen who failed the Reading Test. 



School of Arts and Sciences 



91 



Sophomore Yeor 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 250 2 

Education 300, 301 2 

French 300, 301 3 

French 410, 411 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Health Education 200 — 

Psychology 320 3 

Electives — 



Sjjring Semester 
Credit 



16 
Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

French 415, 416 3 

French 400 — 

French 508 3 

French 505 or 506 3 

Spanish 104, 105 3 

Electives 4 



16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 
Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

French Electives 9 

Spanish 320, 321 3 

German 102, 103 3 



16 



Spritig Semester 
Credit 



15 15 

Minimum Total hours required 126 

Minimum Total French hours required 36 



COURSES IN FRENCH 

Undergraduate 

100. Elementary French I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 101, 102, 2500) 

A course for beginners which emphasizes the four language skills — 
reading, writing, speaking, listening. Prerequisite: none. 



101. 



Credit 3(3-0) 



the 



Elementary French II. 

(Formerly French 102, 103, 2501) 
A continuation of French 2500 with further emphasis placed 
oral-aural approach. Prerequisite: French 2500, or equivalent. 

300. Intermediate French I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 201, 2520) 
A course which consists of a brief review of pronunciation. Grammar is 
stressed with emphasis on easy cultural reading. Prerequisite: French 2500 
or 2501, or two units of high school French. 



92 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

301. Intermediate French II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 202, 2521) 

This course is a continuation of French 2520. Stress is placed on grammar, 
cultural reading- and conversation. Prerequisite: French 2520, or equivalent. 

400. Phonetics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 203, 2522) 

A course in French sounds and diction. Required of all students majoring 
and minoring in French. Recommended for those who wish to improve pro- 
nunciation. Prerequisite: French 2500 and 2501. 

410. Intermediate Oral French. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 204, 2523) 

Intermediate oral French Course which prepares students for French 
2524. It is designed to enable students to understand lectures and conversa- 
tions of average tempo. Prerequisite: French 2520 and 2521. 

411. Advanced Oral French. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 205, 2524) 

A course which offers to students intensive training in self-expression 
and an opportunity to improve pronunciation, diction, reading and speaking. 

415. Survey of French Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 301, 2540) 

A general introduction to the study of French literature. This course gives 
a clear idea of the great periods and main tendencies in history of French 
thought and letters from 842 to the 19th century. 

416. Survey of French Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 301, 2541) 

A continuation of French literature from the 19th century to the present. 

505. Advanced French Composition. 

(Formerly French 401, 2560) 
Advanced course in oral and written self expression in French. Special 
attention to vocabulary building, free composition and conversation, pre- 
pared and improvised, covering the many phases of everyday activities. 

506. Advanced French Grammar and Composition. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 402, 2561) 

Course designed to give the students practical training in the use of ad- 
vanced French grammar and reading. Conducted largely in French. 

508. French Civilization. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 404, 2562) 
A general survey of the history of France, with emphasis on the social, 
political and economic development designed to give the students an under- 
standing of present conditions and events. A detailed study of such French 
institutions as art, music, and education. Course is also offered in con- 
junction with reports of collateral readings. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

602. Problems and Trends in Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 501, 2571) 
Problems encountered by teachers given consideration. Place and purpose 
of foreign language in the curriculum today. 



School of Arts and Sciences 93 

603. Oral Course for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 502) 
Designed for teachers of foreign languages to improve pronunciation and 
spelling. 

606. Research in the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 503, 2573) 

Open to students who are interested in undertaking the study of a special 
problem in the teaching of a foreign language. 

607. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 302, 2574) 

Course presents Classicism through masterpieces of Corneille, Racine, 
Moliere and other authors of the "Golden Period" in French letters. 

608. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 303, 2575) 

To study in particular the life and works of Montesquieu, Voltaire, 
Rousseau, and the Encyclopedists. 

609. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly French 304, 2576) 

Study of the great literary currents of the Nineteenth century Roman- 
ticism and Realism. 

610. The French Theatre. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 504, 2577) 
A thorough study of the French theatre from the Middle Ages to the 
present. 

612. The French Novel. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 505, 2578) 
A study of the novel from the Seventeenth Century to the present. 

614. French Syntax. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 506, 2579) 
Designed to teach grammar on the more advanced level. 

616. Contemporary French Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly French 305 and 2542, 2580) 
Course deals with the chief writers and literary currents from 1900 to 
the present. 

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

For descriptions of these courses, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

720. Advanced Reading and Composition. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 601 and 2580, 2585) 

722. Romantic Movement in France (1820-1848). Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 602 and 2581, 2586) 

724. Seminar in Foreign Languages. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly 603 and 2582, 2587) 

726. Contemporary Literary Criticism. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 604 and 2583, 2588) 

728. Independent Study in Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2584, 2589) 



94 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

COURSES IN SPANISH 

Undergraduate 

104. Elementary Spanish I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 101, 102, 2504) 

A course for beginners which consists of grammar, composition, trans- 
lation, practice in pronunciation and use of the spoken language. 

105. Elementary Spanish II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 102, 103, 1205) 

Continuation of Elementary Spanish 2504. Attention is given to advanced 
grammar. Prerequisite: Spanish 2504 or equivalent. 

320. Intermediate Spanish I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 201, 2530) 

Review of grammar, composition and conversation. Prerequisite: Spanish 
2505 or two years of high school Spanish. 

321. Intermediate Spanish II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 202, 2531) 

Continuation of Spanish 2530. Prerequisite: Spanish 2530 or equivalent. 

440. Phonetics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 202, 2532) 

A systematic analysis of speech sounds, and the operation of phonetic 
laws. Prerequisite: Spanish 2505 or equivalent. 

441. Intermediate Conversation. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 204, 2533) 

Practice and drill in oral Spanish based principally on topics of current 
interest. Prerequisite: Spanish 2505 or equivalent. 

442. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 250, 2534) 

Readings of representative authors of Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 2505 
or equivalent. 

450. La Cultura Hispanica. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 301, 2543) 

A course which covers the basically significant elements of Hispanic 
Civilization: geography, history, literature, and economics of the Spanish 
people. Prerequisite: Spanish 2505 or equivalent. 

451. Survey of Spanish Literature I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 302, 2544) 

A survey of Spanish literature from the Cid through the golden age with 
assigned readings and reports. Prerequisite: Spanish 2505 or equivalent. 

452. Survey of Spanish Literature II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Spanish 303, 2545) 

A survey of Spanish literature from the seventeenth century to the 
present. Prerequisite: Spanish 2505 or equivalent. 

455. Syntax. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Spanish 304, 2546) 
Systematic study of Spanish grammar with conversational and other 
exercises based on contemporary authors. Prerequisite: Spanish 2531. 



School of Arts and Sciences 95 

COURSES IN GERMAN 

Undergraduate 

102. Elementary German I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly German 101, 102, 2502) 

Fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar. Attention given to prepared 
and sight translations and vocabulary building. 

103. Elementary German II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly German 102, 103, 2503) 

Continuation of emphasis on grammar, vocabulary building, prepared and 
sight translations. Maximum attention given to graded readings in German 
prose and drama. 

420. Conversational German. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 201, 2526) 
Intensive practice in everyday German is provided. Prerequisites are 
German 2502, 2503, or approval of instructor. 

422. Intermediate German I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly German 202, 2527) 

This course is open to students who have completed German 2502 and 
2503. The students read a cross-section of the simpler writings in German 
literature and German newspapers. 

423. Intermediate German II. Crdeit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 203, 2528) 
The students continue simple readings from German literature and read 
also a significant, simplified novel. 

425. Intermediate Scientific German. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 205, 206, 2529) 
Works in science on the second-year level. 

427. Survey of German Literature. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly German 2530) 
A general introduction to the study of German literature. This course is 
intended to give an over-all picture of German literature and an opportunity 
to read outstanding works not offered in other German courses. 



COURSES IN RUSSIAN 



106. Elementary Russian I. 

(Formerly Russian 2506) 
An elementary course for beginners which consists of grammar, trans- 
lation, practice in pronunciation and limited use of the spoken language. 
Prerequisite: None. 

107. Elementary Russian II. 

(Formerly Russian 2507) 
Continuation of Elementary Russian 2506. Attention is given to more 
advanced grammar. Reading in Russian is stressed. 
Prerequisite: Russian 2506. 



96 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Howard T. Pearsall, Chairman 

The primary objectives of the Department of Music are as follows: 

1. To train students to teach music in the secondary schools. 

2. To train students who wish to pursue graduate studies in music. 

3. To provide an opportunity for students to perform in the music en- 
sembles. 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education (Band Instruments and Piano) 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Biological Science 4 

English 100, 101 4 

Health Education 200 — 

History of West. Civ. 100, 101 3 

Music 101, 102 3 

Music 105, 106 or Music 113, 114 2 

Orientation 100 1 

Physical Education 101, 102, or 103, 104 1 

Physical Science 100 — 

Air or Military Science 101, 103, or 101, 102 

or Elective 1 

19 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



20 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Biological Science 100 4 

English 100, 101 4 

French or German 100, 101 or 102, 103 3 

Health Education 200 — 

Music 101, 102 3 

Music 111, 112 2 

Orientation 100 1 

Physical Science 100 — 

Air or Military Science 101, 103 or 101, 102 

or Elective 1 

18 



S]>ring Semester 
Credit 



19 



School of Arts and Sciences 



97 



Sophomore Year 
(Band Instruments and Piano) 

Fall Semeste 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 300, 301 2 

English 250 — 

French or German 100, 101 or 102, 103 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

Music 200, 201 3 

Music 205, 206 or 210, 211 2 

Psychology 320 3 

Air or Military Science 201, 203 or 201, 202 

or Electives 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 



21 
Sophomore Year 

(Voice) 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 300, 301 2 

English 250 — 

History of West. Civ. 100, 101 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

Music 200, 201 3 

Music 203, 204 2 

Music 208, 209 2 

Psychology 320 3 

Air or Military Science 201, 203 or 201, 202 

or Electives 2 



20 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 



20 
Junior Year 

(Band Instruments) 

Fall Semeste 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 400 3 

Education 400 3 

Education 530 — 

Music 208, 209 2 

Music 400, 401 2 

Music 402 2 

Music 403, 404 3 

Music 422, 423 2 

Music 424, 425 2 

Music 431 2 



19 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



17 



98 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Junior Year 



(Piano) 

Fall SemesU 

Course and Number Credit 

Education 400 2 

Education 530 — 

Music 400, 401 2 

Music 402 — 

Music 403, 404 3 

Music 424, 425 2 

Music 431, 432 2 

Music 442, 443 2 

Music 446, 447 2 

Music 560 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



17 



Junior Year 



(Voice) 

Fall SemesU 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 400 3 

Education 530 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Music 400, 401 2 

Music 402 — 

Music 403, 404 3 

Music 427, 428 2 

Music 442, 443 2 

Music 450, 451 2 



Sjiring Semestei 
Credit 



17 



18 



Senior Year 



(Band Instruments) 

Fall Semestt 

Course and Number Cred't 

Psychology 436 3 

Education 500 — 

Education 532 — 

Education 560 

Music 405 2 

Music 426 2 

Music 432 2 

Music 501 3 

Music 503 2 

Music 510 3 

Music 561 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



19 



12 



School of Arts and Sciences 



99 



Senior Year 



(Piano) 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Psychology 436 3 

Education 500 — 

Education 531 — 

Education 560 — 

Music 501 3 

Music 503 2 

Music 405 2 

Music 426 2 

Music 512 3 

Music 563 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



12 



Senior Year 



(Voice) 

Fall Semesti 
Course and Number Credit 

Psychology 436 3 

Education 500 — 

Education 531 — 

Education 560 — 

Music 405 2 

Music 513 2 

Music 564 3 

Music 612 2 

Electives 3 



Sjiring Semester 
Credit 



15 



12 



Bachelor of Science 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Ensemble 103, 104 or 115, 116 or 171, 172 or 

173 174 or 175, 176 or 177, 178 2 

Health Education — 

History of Western Civilization 100, 101 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

Music 101, 102 3 

Music 105, 106 or 111, 112 or 113, 114 2 

Orientation 100 1 

Air or Military Science 101, 103 or 101, 102 

or Elective 1 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



19 



20 



100 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Biological Science 100 3 

Ensemble 233, 234 or 235, 236 or 371, 372 or 

373, 374 or 375, 376 or 377, 378 2 

French or German 100, 101 or 102, 103 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Music 200, 201 3 

Music 203, 204 or 205, 206 or 210, 211 2 

Physical Science 100 — 

Air or Military Science 201, 203 or 201, 202 

or Elective 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



19 



19 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

*Electives 4 

Music 208, 209 2 

Ensemble 440, 441 or 442, 443 or 471, 472 or 

473, 474 or 475, 476 or 477, 478 2 

Music 400, 401 2 

Music 402 — 

Music 403, 404 3 

Music 422, 423 or 446, 447 or 450, 451 2 



S]>ring Semester 
Credit 

4 

2 



16 



18 



*To be selected from courses in art, dance, foreign languages, English, 
speech and drama. 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Electives from Music Literature 3 

*Electives 4 

Ensemble 561, 562 or 563, 564 or 571, 572 or 

573, 574, 575 or 577, 578 2 

Music 427, 428 or 560 2 

Music 503 or 614 2 

Music 510, 511 or 512, 513 or 550, 551 2 

Psychology of Music 618 3 



Sv 



ing Semester 
Credit 

3 

6 

2 
2 
2 
3 



18 



18 



*These electives may be in art, dance, foreign languages, English, music 
literature, and speech and drama. 



School of Arts and Sciences 101 

COURSES IN MUSIC THEORY 

Undergraduate 

Ml. Remedial Theory. No Credit 

(Formerly 9600) Required of all Freshmen who fail the theory 
placement examination. 
Notation; scales and intervals, in all keys, with ear training, sight singing, 
melodic and harmonic dictation. 

M2. Remedial Theory. No Credit 

(Formerly 9601) 
A continuation of Ml. 

M101. Theory I. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2600) 
Primary and secondary chords and their inversions in major and minor; 
sight singing, dictation, and keyboard harmony. 

M102. Theory II. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2601) 
Introduction to diatonic seventh chords; simple modulation; sight singing, 
dictation, and keyboard harmony. 

M119. Sight Singing. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2619) 
Singing simple melodies at sight. For choir members, male singers, recrea- 
tion majors, and Home Economics majors. 

M200. Theory III. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2620) 
Modulation; allied theory related to performance practice; part-writing 
procedures; altered and borrowed chords; secondary dominants. 

M201. Theory IV. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2621) 
Augmented triads and the Neapolitan sixth chord; augmented sixth 
chords; of the ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth; advanced modulation. 

M400. Counterpoint I. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2640) 
Two-voice and three-voice counterpoint and two- and three-part inventions. 

M401. Counterpoint II. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2641) 
Eighteenth century contrapuntal style-free counterpoint. 

M402. Form and Analysis. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2642) 

M501. Instrumental Arranging. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2660) 
The art of writing for combinations of instruments; the art of sectional 
writing for instruments; the art of scoring for full band. 



102 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



COURSES IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

Undergraduate 

M424. Percussion Instruments. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2647) 
Techniques and methods of playing percussion instruments. 

M425. Woodwind Instruments. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2648) 
Techniques and methods of playing woodwind instruments. 

M426. Brass Instruments. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2662) 
Techniques and methods of playing brass instruments. 

M431. Voice Class I. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2651) 
Breathing, resonance, diction; art songs. 

M432. Voice Class II. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2652) 
A continuation of 2651. 

M503. Score Reading and Conducting. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2661) 
The reading of clefs; the reading of vocal, orchestral, and band scores, 
and the conducting of the same. 

M560. Accompanying. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly 2671) 
The art of accompanying vocal solos and ensembles. 

COURSES IN MUSIC LITERATURE 



Undergraduate 

M403. History and Appreciation of Music I. 

(Formerly 2643) 
A survey of music from the ancient Greeks to the 18th 

M404. History and Appreciation of Music II. 

(Formerly 2643) 
A survey of music from the 18th century to the present. 

M405. Music of the Baroque. 

(Formerly 2664) 

M406. Music of the Romantic Period. 

(Formerly 2664) 

M407. Modern Music from 1890 to the Present. 

M408. The Symphony. 

M409. Keyboard Music. 

M410. Opera. 

M411. The Art Song. 

M412. Chamber Music. 



Credit 3(2-2) 

century. 

Credit 3(2-2) 



Credit 2(1-2) 

Credit 2(1-2) 

Credit 2(1-2) 
Credit 2(1-2) 
Credit 2(1-2) 
Credit 2(1-2) 
Credit 2(1-2) 
Credit 2(1-2) 



School of Arts and Sciences 103 

COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

Undergraduate 

(Band or Orchestral Instruments) 

M105. Major Instruments for Freshmen. Credit 2(2-5) 

(Formerly 2605) 

Scales, arpeggios, studies, and suitable pieces for individual instruments. 

M106. Major Instruments for Freshmen. Credit 2(0-5) 

(Formerly 2606) 
A continuation of M105. 

M205. Major Instruments for Sophomores. Credit 2(0-5) 

(Formerly 2625) 
Scales, arpeggios, studies, and pieces suitable for individual instruments. 

M206. Major Instruments for Sophomores. Credit 2(0-5) 

(Formerly 2626) 
A continuation of M205. 

M422. Major Instruments for Juniors. Credit 2(0-5) 

(Formerly 2645) 
Scales, arpeggios, studies, and pieces suitable for individual instruments. 

M423. Major Instruments for Juniors. Credit 2(0-5) 

(Formerly 2646) 
A continuation of M422. 

M510. Major Instruments for Seniors. Credit 2(0-5) 

(Formerly 2665) or 3(0-6) 

Scales, arpeggios, studies, and pieces suitable for individual instruments, 
or Senior Recital. 

M511. Major Instruments for Seniors. Credit 3(0-6) 

Senior Recital. 

(Piano) 

Each course will consist of examination of basic pianistic skills and their 
translation into piano studies and repertoire chosen to meet the musical 
and technical needs of the individual student. 

The piano major will be expected to make public performances and to 
give a full length recital in the senior year. 

The emphasis for secondary piano students will be to become as fluent 
as possible at the piano. Those secondary students who are capable 
pianistically will be expected to play publicly: otherwise performances will 
be in class recitals and/or for committees. 

One hour lesson, or two half hour lessons, per week, plus a minimum of 
one hour of practice daily is required in order to earn two hours of credit 
per semester. To earn more than two hours of credit does not require 
more lessons per week but it does require a relative increase in the daily 
practice. One hour every day for each two hours of credit. 

M3. Remedial Piano Class. No Credit 

(Formerly 9603) 

M113. Piano I. Credit 2(0-5) 



104 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



M114. Piano II. 

M210. Piano III. 

M211. Piano IV. 

M446. Piano V. 

M447. Piano VI. 

M512. Piano VII. 

M513. Piano VIII. 

M208. Secondary Piano I. 

M209. Secondary Piano II. 

M427. Secondary Piano III. 

M428. Secondary Piano IV. 



(Voice) 



Mill. 


Voice I. 


M112. 


Voice II. 


M203. 


Voice III. 


M204. 


Voice IV. 


M450. 


Voice V. 


M451. 


Voice VI. 


M550. 


Voice VII. 


M551. 


Voice VIII 



COURSES FOR ENSEMBLES 



M103. Band— Freshmen. 

M104. Band — Freshmen. 

M107. Male Singers — Freshmen. 

M108. Male Singers — Freshmen. 

M115. Choir — Freshmen. 

M116. Choir — Freshmen. 

M233. Band — Sophomores. 

M234. Band — Sophomores. 

M235. Choir — Sophomores. 

M236. Choir — Sophomores. 

M440. Band — Junior. 

M441. Band — Juniors. 

M442. Choir — Juniors. 

M443. Choir — Juniors. 

M444. Male Singers — Juniors. 

M445. Male Singers — Juniors. 



Credit 2(0-5) 

Credit 2(0-5) 

Credit 2(0-5) 

Credit 2(0-5) 

Credit 2(0-5) 

Credit 2(0-5) 
or 3(0-6) 

Credit 3(0-6) 

Credit 2(0-5) 

Credit 2(0-5) 

Credit 2(0-5) 

Credit 2(0-5) 

Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 3(0-6) 



Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-5) 
Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 2(0-4) 



School of Arts and Sciences 105 

M561. Band — Seniors. Credit 2(0-5) 

M562. Band — Seniors. Credit 2(0-5) 

M563. Choir — Seniors. Credit 2(0-4) 

M564. Choir — Seniors. Credit 2(0-4) 

M565. Male Singers — Seniors. Credit 2(0-4) 

M566. Male Singers — Seniors. Credit 2(0-4) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

M610. Music in Elementary Schools Today. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2680) 
The conceptual approach; the Orff and Kodaly methods. 

M614. Choral Conducting of School Music Groups. Credit 2(0-4) 

Girls' and boys' glee clubs, mixed ensembles and mixed choirs. 

M616. Instrumental Conducting of School Music Groups. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly 2683) 
The skills of conducting with literature for beginners, intermediate, and 
advanced junior high and senior high school bands and orchestras. 

M618. The Psychology of Music. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2684) 
The use of psychology in the learning and teaching of music. 

M620. Advanced Music Appreciation. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2685) 
Emphasis on large music forms, including Bach's B Minor Mass and Six 
Brandenburg Concertos, Mozart's Don Giovanni, Beethoven's Symphony No. 
IX, Schubert's Symphony in C Major and the Trout Quintet, Berlioz's 
Symphony Fantastique, Brahm's Symphony No. IV, Bizet's Carmen, Verdi's 
Aida, Wagner's Lohengrin, Debussy's Afternoon of a Faun, Bartok's Con- 
certo for Orchestra, Berg's Wozzeck, Hindemith's Mathis der Maler, and 
others. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION 
AND THEATER ARTS 

John Marshall Stevenson, Acting Chairman 

The general aim of the Department of Speech Communication and 
Theater Arts is to develop good speech in the individual student and to 
acquaint him with American Standard Diction and the Standard Speech of 
his section of the country; to acquaint him with the theater of the world, 
both technical and literary. This objective is accomplished by means of 
general voice and diction courses, introductory courses in theater production 
and dramatic literature, and laboratory courses in which instruction in 
speech correction and theater is given. 

A second general aim of the department is to provide the necessary 
instruction and training for prospective teachers of speech and theater. 

In carrying out these general aims, certain specific objectives are brought 
into focus. The specific objectives are (1) to train the student to use good 



106 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

speech himself and to recognize it in others; (2) to train him to correct 
the speech of others; (3) to train him to be able to plan and implement a 
speech and theater program in a secondary school or in a community; and 
(4) to provide the background necessary for successful graduate study in 
speech communication and theater. 

The basic course in Speech Fundamentals is offered to the entire Uni- 
versity, and nearly all degree programs require students to take at least 
one course in speech, usually Speech Fundamentals. Thus the Department 
of Speech Communication and Theater Arts seeks to fulfill a major in- 
stitutional objective. 

In addition to the basic speech course required of virtually all degree 
candidates, the Department proposes to offer a major which has two areas 
of concentration: Speech and Theater Education, and Professional Theater. 

At the beginning of each academic year, speech communication and 
theater majors are required to register with the department. Students 
intending to major in speech are encouraged to register at the earliest 
possible time. 



MAJOR CONCENTRATIONS 

The student will select one of the concentrations of study in the De- 
partment of Speech Communication and Theater Arts (see the concentration 
descriptions for requirements). 



SPEECH AND THEATER EDUCATION 

Students who wish to prepare for teaching careers in the secondary 
schools should apply for admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
Programs for these students are prepared in consultation with the depart- 
mental advisor in Speech Education. 



PROFESSIONAL THEATER 

Students who wish to prepare for careers in the Professional Theater 
must audition before the theater arts faculty and be approved before 
enrolling in the professional curriculum. Only those students whose back- 
grounds and abilities give evidence of probable success in their field are 
encouraged to enter this curriculum. The Department reserves the right 
to recommend to students a change from the professional program to the 
teaching program. 

Any Speech Communication and Theater Arts Major making a grade of 
"D" in any major course must repeat the course and pass same with a 
grade of "C" before that course may be counted toward the Major. 

NOTE: A passing grade on the Speech Proficiency examinations is a 
prerequisite for the degree. Students are advised to take this 
examination the first semester of their junior year. Failure to pass 
this examination will result in the student's having to take addi- 
tional instruction in Speech until he is able to successfully pass 
the examinations. 



School of Arts and Sciences 107 

SPEECH AND THEATER EDUCATION 

The study of Speech and Theater Education emphasizes first the under- 
standing of communication events in their psychological, social, and philo- 
sophical aspects; second, the development of knowledge and techniques for 
the critical appraisal of public discourse; and third, the acquiring of knowl- 
edge and skills requisite to the creation and presentation of effective public 
discourse. 

An extensive activities program complements the academic program of 
this Department. The Department sponsors programs of co-curricular 
activities in debate, discussion, and oratory and the programs are open 
to all students with special interests and ability. Intercollegiate debate 
competition, which in recent years has been virtually non-existent, is being 
revised and annually provides an opportunity to the University's Debaters 
to oppose teams from a number of colleges and universities in both regional 
and national tournaments. 

Students electing to major in this area are also required to enroll in 
Education Core Courses which will enable them upon graduation to meet 
the State's Certification requirements for teachers in the secondary schools 
of North Carolina. 

THE SPEECH LABORATORY 

The Speech Laboratory provides facilities and equipment for the evalua- 
tion and the improvement of the students' voice and diction. The electronic 
laboratory is used also to implement instruction in speech organization, 
development, style and the oral interpretation of literature. In short, this 
facility provides the opportunity to adopt the newer approach to speech 
training, e.g., listening training to improve comprehension. 

PROGRAMS FOR THE SPEECH LABORATORY 

The Speech Laboratory encompasses three programs, e.g., Speech Im- 
provement, Speech Therapy, and Listening Comprehension or Listening 
Training and Practice. 

The Speech Improvement Program which could be designated as the "A" 
Program is designed to provide supervised laboratory practice to develop 
■acceptable or standard pronunciation patterns and a satisfactory, flexible 
speaking voice. Students enrolled in this program may use substandard 
dialects and show vocal monotony or abuse that stems from cultural dis- 
advantage. This program would also be advised for any student who desired 
to increase speech intelligibility and to overcome any non-organic voice 
inadequacies. Students planning to enter professions or vocations that re- 
quire exemplary pronunciation patterns and voice usage could benefit from 
this program as well. Such professions include teaching, law, the ministry, 
the theater, singing, and television and radio broadcasting. 

The Listening Training and Practice Program could be designated as the 
"B" Program. It is designed to give laboratory instruction and practice to 
develop both listening comprehension and critical listening ability. This 
program represents the new stress that is now being placed on the listener 
in speech instruction. 

This program is an integral part of the course in speech fundamentals 
and would be required of all students enrolled in the course. The content 



108 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



of this program would implement instruction in such speech processes as 
organization of ideas, choice of ideas, support of ideas and in speech 
language and style. Students may be asked to attend the laboratory, for 
instance, to listen to a recorded speech to identify the speaker's lines of 
reasoning his pattern of organization, his methods of supporting an idea; 
or he may be asked to make judgment on the social value of the speaker's 
ideas. He may also be asked to identify and to evaluate the speaker's 
language and style. 

This program should enable students to cultivate much needed listening 
skills. A high percent of the average American's time is spent in listening. 
Listening skill is basic to the teaching-learning process. It is essential in 
inter-personal relationships and in transactions in government, business, 
industry, and religion. 

SPEECH AND THEATER EDUCATION 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

Social Science 100, 101 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Physical Science 100 — 

Physical Education 101, 103 1 

Education (Orientation) 1 

Elective or ROTC 1 



S]>ring Semester 
Credit 

4 

3 

3 

4 
1 



17 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

^Foreign Language (German, French, 

Spanish or Russian) 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Health Education 200 2 

Speech 250 (Fundamentals) 2 

Speech 410 (Phonetics) — 

Theater 302 (Play Production I) 3 

Free Electives including Air/Military Science 3 

General Psychology — 

Behavioral Science Electives — 

Education 300 2 



16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 301, 400 2 

Speech 510 (Correction) 3 

Theater 450, 451 (History) 3 

Major Electives 5 

Behavioral Science Electives 3 



18 



Sjiring Semester 
Credit 



16 



15 



School of Arts and Sciences 109 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Major Electives 6 — 

Education 436, 500-539, 560 6 12 

12 12 

*French, Spanish, German or Russian through Intermediate Level. 

PROFESSIONAL THEATER 

Studies in theater for the undergraduate major are considered to be a 
part of the newly acquired Liberal Arts orientation of the University. 
Students who elect this concentration do not specialize in any one aspect of 
theater, but receive a liberally oriented theater background which will 
permit sound specialization after graduation. The concentration emphasizes, 
first, a substantial background in dramatic literature; second, classroom 
and directed study of performing arts; and third, presentation of various 
artistic endeavors in public performance. 

The newly constructed A. & T. State University Theater offers labora- 
tories for participation in directing, scene design, acting, playwriting, 
audience reaction, costuming, and makeup. 

Courses in radio-television-film may interest students for several different 
reasons. Some will want to take one or two courses as part of their general 
education at the University; various radio-television-film courses may 
satisfy the general requirements for social studies and humanities credits. 
Other students take course work in the area as part of their education for 
a career in which they might expect to use mass communications. Those 
interested in professional broadcasting careers will find preliminary in- 
struction in radio-television-film which will prepare them for further study. 

A. & T. State University operates its own closed circuit radio station, 
and it is anticipated that its TV station will be functioning by Spring 
semester 1972. While the radio-television facility will be staffed by a full- 
time professionally trained person, it is anticipated that some student-staff 
positions will be available for professionally oriented students. 



PROFESSIONAL THEATER 



Freshman Year 



120 Hrs. Total 
50 Hrs.— Major Total 



Fall Semester Spriiig Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Education (Orientation) 1 — 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

Social Science 100, 101 3 3 

Biological Science 100 4 — 

Physical Science 100 — 4 

Physical Education 101, 103 1 1 

Elective or ROTC 1 1 

17 16 



110 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

**Foreign Language 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Speech 250 2 

Theater 301 3 

Theater 302 3 

Major Electives 3 

Behavioral Science Electives — 

General Psychology — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 



17 



16 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Ccnirsc and Number Credit 

^Behavioral Science Electives 3 

**Foreign Language 3 

Theater History I, II 3 

Free Electives 3 

Major Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



15 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Theater 400 (Scene Design) — 

Theater 441 (Stagecraft & Lighting) 3 

Theater 440 (Play Directing) 3 

Major Electives 6 

Theater 650 (Acting or Technical Workshop) — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



12 



12 



*No more than two courses in sociology, economics, geography, anthro- 
pology, histor or psychology. 

s *Majors in professional theater may elect one year of study in two 
different languages through intermediate levels. 



SPEECH 

216. Voice and Diction Laboratory. Credit 1(0-2) 

Supervised practice with the aid of an electronic laboratory in the de- 
velopment of speech intelligibility and an adequate speaking voice. For 
students whose professional pursuits require above average proficiency in 
articulation, pronunciation, and voice management; or for students whose 
substandard speech and voice patterns may come from cultural disad- 
vantaged; and for foreign students who wish to increase the intelligibility 
of their spoken American English. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

250. Speech Fundamentals. Credit 2(2-0) 

An introduction to the rhetorical psychological, physiological, phonetic, 

linguistic, and communication bases of oral discourse. Supervised electronic 



School of Arts and Sciences 111 

laboratory practice in articulation and voice improvement and listening 
improvement. Preparation and practice in public address, discussion, oral 
reading, and interpersonal speech activity. Prerequisite: English 101. 

251. Public Speaking. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 211, 2426) 

A study of the methods by which public speeches are made clear, in- 
teresting, and forceful; practice in writing and delivering speeches according 
to the occasion. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

252. Argumentation and Debate. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 312, 2427) 

Study and practice in analysis, gathering of material, briefing, ordering 
of arguments and evidence, refutation, and delivery. Prerequisite: Speech 
250. 

253. Parliamentary Procedure. 

(Formerly English 313, 2428) 
Theory and practice in the rules and customs governing organization and 
proceedings of deliberative bodies. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

335. Rhetoric of American Thought. Credit 3(3-0) 

A critical study of selected American orators — their speech making on 
controversial social and political issues from 1830-1960, as well as the 
reaction of their audiences. Black American orators will be included. Pre- 
requisite: Speech 250. 

: 636. Persuasive Communication. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the theory and practice of persuasive speaking in the demo- 
cratic society, including formal and informal persuasive speaking, types 
of proof, and the ethics of persuasion. Some practice in the preparation 
and delivery of persuasive messages. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

404. Speech Pathology I. Credit 4(3-2) 
Definition, classification, etiology and treatment of articulation disorders. 

Also, an introduction to clinical procedures in communicative disorders. 
Supervised observation and limited participation in evaluations, therapy 
and conferences included in a laboratory. Prerequisite: Speech 102 and 
junior standing. 

405. Speech Pathology II. Credit 4(3-2) 
Definition, classification, etiology and treatment of voice disorders, 

language disorders, stuttering and cluttering. Prerequisite: Speech 104. 

407. Introduction to Audiology. Credit 3(2-2) 

An introduction to hearing sciences, hearing evaluation, hearing con- 
servation and aural rehabilitation. Prerequisite: Speech 102. 

410. Phonetics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 410, 2443) 
The study of general American phonetics and its importance in speech 
correction. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

420. Group Discussion. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2445) 
A study of the forms of discussion and the principles and methods 
underlying them. Practice in both leading and participating in discussion 
situations. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 



112 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

421. Oral Reading and Interpretation. Credit 2(2-0) 

A course designed for Speech and Theater majors and minors and for 
any student who wishes to improve himself in oral interpretation with the 
individual and group. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

*510. Introduction to Speech Correction. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2465) 
A study of the causes, symptoms, and treatment of minor speech dis- 
orders. Observation and practice in clinical techniques. Prerequisite: Speech 
410. 

* Advanced Undergraduate and Graduates. 

539. Methods of Teaching Speech. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the aims, objectives, problems and difficulties experienced in 
teaching speech in the modern school. Special attention is given to the 
organization and coordination of both speech and theater curriculums, to 
planning courses of study, its presentation, and to the selection of materials 
and equipment required of all Speech and Theater Education majors. 
Prerequisites: 27 hours of speech and 15 hours of Education and Psychology. 

THEATER 

300. Theatre Practice. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly English 215, 2430) 

Practical experience in staging and setting up technical designs; back- 
stage work in costume, makeup, stagecraft, lighting, etc., is required. 

301. Acting. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly English 2431) 

A laboratory course designed to develop skill in voice, diction, and 
Pantomime by means of readings, monologues, skits, and short plays for 
school and community; practical experience in the major A. and T. pro- 
ductions. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

302. Elements of Play Production. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly English 315, 2432) 

Study of basic principles in all aspects of production and application of 
these principles to particular situations; affords opportunities for practical 
experience in acting, directing, lighting, scenery design, and construction. 
Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

400. Scene Design. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2448, 2440) 

A course in perspective, dealing with the representation of common 

objects, interiors, buildings, and landscapes as they appear to the eye. One 

hour lecture and two hours laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Theater 302. 

440. Play Directing. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 416, 2446) 
Elementary principles of staging plays; practical work in the directing 
of the one-act play; attention is given to the principles of selecting, casting, 
and rehearsing of plays. Exercises, lectures, and demonstrations. Pre- 
requisite: Theater 301, 302. 



School of Arts and Sciences 113 

441. Stagecraft and Lighting. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 415, 2447) 
Study of principles of scenery construction and painting; practice in 
mounting productions for major shows. Prerequisite: Theater 302. 

457. Essentials of Playwriting. Credit 3(3-0) 

Emphasis on creative work and class criticism; structure, characteriza- 
tion and dialogue are studied with reference to standard plays. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

460. Radio Production. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 2449) 
Practical experience in radio broadcasting techniques and conventional 
studio practices; projects in radio announcing and acting, creative dramatics, 
commercial announcements, variety shows, and verse reading. Programs 
planned and executed by the students. Prerequisite: Speech 250. 

500. History of the Theater I. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of theatre architecture, scenery, costume, methods of staging 

and production in Europe as well as a study of representative playwrights 
from Ancient Greece to Russia. Prerequisite: Theater 302 or consent of 
instructor. 

501. History of the Theatre II. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of Theatre I beginning with Realism, Naturalism, 

Symbolism, Expressionism, and neo-Romanticism in Theatre down to the 
Avant-Garde Theatre in Europe. Prerequisite: Theater 302 or consent of 
the instructor. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

SPEECH 

630. Speech for Teachers. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly English 2743) 
Study and application of the fundamental principles of oral communica- 
tion related to teaching and learning; speech activities and interpersonal 
relations identified both with teaching and learning and the teaching pro- 
fession; exercises for self -improvement in the various speech processes. 

634. Introduction to Rhetorical Criticism. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the principles and methods underlying the rhetorical analysis 

and evaluation of public speeches. 

635. Great Speeches of the Western World. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of the role of public address in the social, political, and in- 
tellectual history of Western man. A reading and critical analysis of 
selected speeches from Greco-Roman times to the present. 

736. British Public Address. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the history and criticism of British public address through 
analysis of speeches on political and social issues of the 18th and 19th 
centuries. 



114 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

737. Communication Theories. Credit 3(3-0) 

The role of spoken communication in social adaptation. Relationships of 
thought, language, and expression; verbal perception and cognition; com- 
munication models and their characteristics. 

740. Seminar in Speech Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

Methods and materials for teaching speech courses and directing or 
supervising dramatic, forensic, and speech activities. 

THEATER 

620. Community and Creative Dramatics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly English 515, 2470) 
Theory and function of creative dramatics and applications in elementary 
education; demonstrations with children; special problems for graduate 
students. 

630. Early American Drama and Theatre to 1900. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of Representative plays in the American Theatre from Early 

Colonial Period to 1900 as a reflection of national life and culture. 

631. Modern American Drama and Theatre since 1900. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of significant developments in the American Theatre since 1900 

as reflected through her major playwrights and theatre organization. 

650. Theater Workshop. Credit 3-6(0-6) 

A practicum involving the total theatrical experience. Involves units in 
acting, directing, stagecraft, designing and other such activities. Approxi- 
mately 90 clock hours are devoted to technical production. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing or consent of instructor. 

653. Principles and Practice of Stage Costume. Credit 3(2-2) 
The function of costumes for the stage and for television, and their 

relationship to other elements of dramatic production. Includes research in 
construction of authentic period forms. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. 

654. Problems in Acting. Credit 3(2-2) 
Acting problems arising from differences in the types and style of 

dramatic production; emphasis on individual and group performance. Pre- 
requisite: Theater 301. 

655. Advanced Play Production. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of modern methods of staging and lighting plays. Directing on a 

multiple set; arena staging, intellectual values; script analysis. Pre- 
requisite: Theater 302 and 440. 

656. Advanced Directing. Credit 3(2-3) 
A consideration of rehearsal problems and techniques as may be reflected 

in the 3 act play. In conjunction with the acting classes and the Richard B. 
Harrison Players, students direct projects selected from a variety of genres. 
Prerequisite: Theater 440. 

Recommended Electives 

The Department of Speech Communication and Theater Arts recommends 
the following electives to its majors who are pursuing either the teaching 
curriculum or the professional curriculum: 



School of Arts and Sciences 



115 



Music 404 
Music 405 
Art 224 
Art 400 



Music and Art 

History and Appreciation 
Baroque and Romantic Periods 
Art Appreciation 
Renaissance Art 



History 205 
History 206 
History 207 
History 107 
Sociology 204 
Sociology 306 
Sociology 401 



Social Science 

United States Since 1865 
History of Africa 
History of the Negro 
Religious and Civilization 
Social Problems 
Minority Problems 
Origins of Social Thought 



English 300 
English 221 
English 431 
English 410 
English 620 
English 752 
English 455 



English 

Advanced Composition 

English Literature II 

American Literature II 

Shakespeare 

Elizabethan Drama 

Restoration and 18th Century British Drama 

Journalism 



Physical Education 229 
Physical Education 451 
Physical Education 452 



Physical Education 

Dance 

Dance Composition 

Applied Dance 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES 

Alpha Psi Omega National Dramatic Honor Fraternity (Phi Epsilon 
Chapter) was chartered at New York University and installed on campus 
during the Fall semester, 1970. Students of high ability and who are 
nominated by the department are eligible for membership. See Student 
Handbook for details. 

Black Arts Repertory Company is dedicated to the production of plays 
and musicals concerned with the experience of the black man in Africa and 
in the Western Hemisphere. Membership is not restricted to any race or 
group. Each year's calendar will schedule special productions from the 
repertoire of black playwrights and other cultural artists. 

Richard B. Harrison Players is the regular dramatics organization which 
is open to all interested students enrolled in the University. The organiza- 
tion presents its plays regularly in the Little Theater which is one of the 
more efficient facilities for theatrical productions in the nation. The theater 
seats 371 persons. 



DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCE 

AND MATHEMATICS 



. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

• DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

• DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

• DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 



118 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Artis P. Graves, Chairman 

The program of the Biology Department is designed to serve the needs 
of the university as a whole in the area of the biological sciences. The 
undergraduate courses of instruction are organized to provide training 
necessary for specialization in agricultural sciences, home economics, nursing, 
horticulture, and the teaching of Biology. The Department offers courses 
designed to meet the general education requirement of the university and a 
professional program for entrance into graduate, medical, dental and 
veterinary schools. A Master of Science degree in Education with concen- 
tration in Biology is also offered by the Biology Department. 

A student may earn the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology by pursuing 
either of the two curricula offered by the department. The professional 
major is designed to meet the needs of students planning a vocation in 
industry, dentistry, medicine, veterinary medicine, or further graduate 
studies. The teaching major is designed for Biology majors who desire to 
meet the requirements for certification as secondary school teachers in 
North Carolina. 

The curricula of the two programs are similarly structured in the freshman 
and sophomore years. The course requirements of the upper level of these 
programs vary in that each is geared toward its specific goal. 

The Master of Science in Education. A graduate student may earn the 
Master of Science degree in Education with concentration in Biology by 
pursuing the thesis or the non-thesis program. 

The thesis plan requires a minimum of thrity hours of graduate credit 
including research for the thesis. Thirty semester hours of graduate credit 
are also required in the non-thesis plan. 

In each of these procedures the minimum required courses in professional 
education are identical, namely six semester hours. The academic program 
in each prescribes a minimum of 18 semester hours in subject matter 
courses for certification in a specific area of concentration. The two pro- 
grams require six semester hours of free electives that are recommended 
in the areas of chemistry, physics, mathematics or biology. 

In the pursuance of the M.S. in Education Degree with a major in 
Biology under the non-thesis program, the candidate is required to com- 
plete 18 semester hours in biological science. Six semester hours of 
electives can be selected in the area of chemistry, mathematics, biology or 
physics. Of the above required 24 hours, 18 are applied to subject matter 
requirement of the degree and six are prescribed as electives. Six semester 
hours of professional education courses are also required. 

Participants who wish to pursue the degree under the non-thesis plan 
could receive it by successfully meeting the following requirements: 

Major (Biology) 18 semester hours 

Education 6 semester hours 

Electives 6 semester hours 

30 semester hours 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 119 

Professional Major. The professional major requires the student to com- 
plete a minimum of 32 semester hours in the major field consisting of the 
following courses: Biology 140, 121, 160, 260, 465, 466, 561, 562, 568 and 
569. The professional major is further required to complete the following 
courses in related sciences and other areas: Chemistry 101, 102, 221, 222; 
Physics 225, 226; Mathematics 111, 113; English 100, 101; Speech 250; 
Education 100, 300, 301; French 100, 101, or German 102, 103; Health 
Education 200; Humanities 200, 201; Psychology 320; History 100, 101; 
Physical Education, 4 hours; Air or Military Science, 6 hours or 6 hours 
of free electives. Six hours of major electives are further recommended in 
this program. 

Teaching Major. This program requires a minimum of 32 semester hours 
in Biology. These credits must include the following courses: Biology 140, 
121, 400, 160, 260, 466, 561, 562 and 568. Related science requirements 
consist of: Chemistry 101, 102, and 221; Physics 225, 226. Teacher certifica- 
tion requirements consist of the following courses: Education 300, 301, 
500, 535, 400 and 560; Psychology 320 and 436. Other requirements include 
Education 100; English 100, 101; Speech 250; French 100, 101 or German 
102, 103; Health Education 200; Humanities 200, 201; Mathematics 111, 
113; Physical Education, 4 hours; History 100, 101; 6 hours of free 
electives or 6 hours of Air or Military Science. Three hours of major 
electives are also recommended. 

A minimum of 20 semester hours in Biology is required of students who 
minor in Biology. The minor consists of the following courses, or their 
equivalent: Biology 140, 160, 260, 466 and 561. 

It is suggested that persons planning to apply for admission to medical 
schools should pursue a major in Biology, or a major in Chemistry and a 
minor in Biology. 



Programs for Biological Science Majors 
PROFESSIONAL MAJOR CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Air or Military Science or Electives 1 1 

Education 100 1 — 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

Physical Education 101, 103 (Men) 

or 102, 104 (Women) 1 1 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Biology 160, 140 or Biology 140, 160 4 4 

18 17 



120 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Air or Military Science or Electives 2 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

Education 300 2 

Speech 250 — 

Health Education 200 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 320 3 

*Biology 260, 121 4 

18 

Junior Year 

Fall Seinester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 301 2 

Chemistry 221, 222 5 

French or German 100, 101 or 102, 103 3 

Biology 465, 466 4 

*Biology 561 — 

Electives (Free) 3 

17 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Physics 225, 226 4 

Biology 562 4 

Biology 568, 569 1 

Electives (Major) 3 

Electives (Free) — 

12 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

2 
4 

2 
2 
3 

4 

17 



Spriiig Semester 
Credit 



5 
3 
3 

4 
3 

18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



1 

3 

4 

12 



TEACHING CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Air or Military Science or Electives 1 

Education 100 1 

English 100, 101 4 

Health Education 200 — 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 

Physical Education 101 (Men) 

or 102 (Women) 1 

History 100, 101 3 

*Biology 160, 140 or Biology 140, 160 4 

18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 

4 

18 



*These courses may be taken during the fall or spring semesters. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 



121 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course, and Number Credit Credit 

Air or Military Science or Electives 2 2 

*Biology 121, 160 4 4 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 4 

Education 300, 301 2 2 

Speech 250 — 2 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Physical Education 103 (Men) 

or 104 (Women) — 1 

Psychology 320 3 — 



18 



18 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Biology 400 — 

Chemistry 221 5 

Education 400 3 

French 100, 101 or German 102, 103 3 

Physics 225, 226 4 

Biology 466 — 

Electives, (Free) 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



16 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 500 — 

Education 535 — 

Education 560 — 

Psychology 436 3 

*Biology 561 4 

*Biology 562 4 

Biology 568 or 569 1 

Electives, (Major) 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 

6 



15 



12 



COURSES IN BIOLOGY 



Undergraduate 

100. Biological Science. Credit 4(3-2) 

(Formerly Biol. Sc. 1501) 
This is a general education course that stresses the objectives presented 
under the general education program of the School of Education and 
General Studies. It is structured to meet the needs of students who plan to 
teach (a) at the pre-school level, (b) at the elementary school level, (c) at 
the secondary level in a non-science mathematics area, and (d) in the area 



*These courses may be taken during the fall or spring semesters. 



122 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

of music. In addition, this course is designed for freshmen who plan to 
concentrate in the divisions of the Humanities or the Social Sciences. 

400. Field Biology. Credit 3(1-4) 

(Formerly Biol. 1540) 
This course is designed to give a more detailed understanding of the 
ecological requirements of organisms, their distribution and their way of 
life. Emphasis is placed on the method of collecting, classifications, and 
preserving samples of organisms, where and when to find them and the 
sources of pertinent information regarding them. 

COURSES IN BACTERIOLOGY 
Undergraduate 

120. Microbiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Bact. 1523) 

A survey of the principles and techniques of microbiology and immunology 
with special emphasis on their application to nursing. 

121. General Microbiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Gen. Bact. 1524) 

A general course designed to orient the student within the world of 
microscopic living things, including yeasts, molds, bacteria, rickettsiae, and 
viruses. Detailed study is given to bacteria as prototypes of all micro- 
organisms. Relationships among microorganisms and selected macro- 
organisms (higher plants, animals, man) are emphasized. Prerequisites: 
Biology 160, 140; Chemistry 101 and 102. 

420. Dairy Bacteriology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Bact. 1543) 

A general course which considers some of the common organisms asso- 
ciated with normal, and abnormal fermentations of milk; the role of micro- 
organisms in the production and decomposition of various dairy products 
is also considered. Prerequisite: Biology 121. 

421. Soil Bacteriology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Bact. 1544) 

The role of microorganisms in soil fertility. Special emphasis is on the 
activity of the nitrogen-fixing bacteria and also those concerned in the 
decomposition of organic waste materials. Prerequisite: Biology 121. 

COURSES IN BOTANY 

Undergraduate 

140. General Botany. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Bot. 1507) 
Plants as living organisms constituting an integrated part of man's 
environment. Emphasis is placed on cellular function, plant structure and 
function, evolutionary tendencies, and living processes. 

430. Plant Taxonomy. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Bot. 1527) 
Systematic botany, and taxonomic system, botanical nomenclature, and 
herbarium techniques are combined in this study of selected orders, families, 
and genera of seed plants. Prerequisite: Botany 140. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 123 

432. Plant Physiology. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Bot. 1528) 
An elementary course designed to develop a clear understanding of the 
basic physiological process related to the structure, growth, and function 
of the seed plants. Prerequisites: Biology 140, Chemistry 101 and 102. 

530. Plant Pathology. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Bot. 1547) 
Basic factors governing the development of plant diseases including 
host-parasite relationships, effect of environment on disease development 
and the nature of disease resistance. Prerequisite: Botany 140. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

640. Plant Biology. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Bot. 1572) 
A presentation of fundamental botanical concepts to broaden the back- 
ground of high school biology teachers. Bacteria, fungi, and other micro- 
scopic plants will be considered as well as certain higher forms of plants. 
The course will consist of lectures, laboratory projects, and field trips. 

642. Special Problems in Botany. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Bot. 1573) 
Open to advanced students in botany for investigation of specific problems. 
Prerequisite: Biology 140 or 640. 

COURSE IN GENERAL SCIENCE 

600. General Science for Elementary Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Gen. Sci. 1570) 
This course will consider some of the fundamental principles of the life 
and physical sciences in an integrated manner in the light of present 
society needs. 

COURSES IN ZOOLOGY 

Undergraduate 

160. General Zoology. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Zool. 1512) 
An introduction to the study of invertebrates and vertebrates with em- 
phasis on cellular physiology and the morphology, and physiology of repre- 
sentative forms. 

260. Comparative Evolution of the Vertebrates. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Zool. 1531) 
A comparative study of chordate organ systems with rather detailed em- 
phasis on the evolution and organogenesis of primitive chordates, dogfish 
shark and the cat. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 

460. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Zool. 1532) 

Comprehensive consideration of the morphology, function, phylogeny, 

classification and the life histories of representative forms of lower and 

higher invertebrate groups exclusive of insects. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 



124 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

461. Human Anatomy and Physiology. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly Zool. 1533) 
A study of general structure and function of the human body. Not open 
to Biology majors. 

465. Histology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1551) 

The microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues and organs with special em- 
phasis on histogenesis, histochemistry and histophysiology. Prerequisite: 
Biology 160. 

466. Principles of Genetics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1552) 

Chromosomal mechanisms and the molecular basis of heredity; concept 
of template surfaces and the replication and genetic organization of DNA. 
Gene action at the molecular level; gene structure and function; the genetic 
code; regulation of protein synthesis; cell differentiation and development. 

467. General Entomology. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1553) 

Elementary structure, description, and habits of the principal orders of 
insects. Laboratory work will consist of collecting, mounting, preserving, 
and classification of principal insect representatives. Recommended for 
general science and biological science majors. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 

468. Economic Entomology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1554) 

Elementary structure, life histories, classification, and control of insect 
pests and related arthropods. Recommended for students majoring in one 
of the agricultural sciences. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 

469. Human Anatomy. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1556) 

Lectures, demonstrations and laboratory study emphasizing basic facts 
and principles of body structure. Not open to Biology majors. 

560. Human Physiology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1565) 

An introductory course with emphasis placed on basic principles and 
mechanisms of physiological functioning of body cells, tissues and systems. 
Required of majors in Physical Education. Not open to Biology majors. 
Prerequisite: Biology 469. 

561. Vertebrate Embryology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1566) 

Study of the developmental stages of selected vertebrates. The materials 
are treated comparatively and consist of amphibian, bird, rodent, and 
references to mammalian forms. Prerequisite: Biology 260. 

562. Introductory Cell Physiology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1567) 

A treatment at the molecular level of the fundamental processes in living 
cells. The biochemistry of cellular constituents, bioenergetics, intermediary 
metabolism, and the regulatory mechanisms of the cell will be discussed. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 221. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 125 

568. Seminar in Biology. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1568) 

A seminar on selected topic and recent advances in the field of plant and 
animal biology. This course is required of all seniors. 

569. Seminar in Biology. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Zool. 1569) 
A continuation of Zoology 568. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

660. Special Problems in Zoology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1574) 

Open to students qualified to do research in Zoology. 

661. Mammalian Biology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1575) 

Study of the evolutionary history, classification, adaptation and variation 
of representative mammals. Prerequisite: Biology 160. 

662. Biology of Sex. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1576) 

Lectures on the origin and development of the germ cells and reproductive 
systems in selected animal forms. Prerequisites: Biology 140 and 160. 

663. Cytology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1577) 

Study of the cell with lectures and periodic student reports on modern 
advances in cellular biology. Prerequisites: Biology 140, 160 and 465. 

664. Histo-Chemical Technique. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1578) 

Designed to develop skills in the preparation of cells, tissues and organs 
for microscopic observation and study. Prerequisites: Biology 160 and 260. 

665. Nature Study. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Zool. 1579) 

A study of diversified organisms, their habits, life histories, defenses, sex 
relationships, periodic activities and economic values designed to acquaint 
the student with fundamental knowledge that should lead to a fuller ap- 
preciation of nature. 

666. Experimental Embryology. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Zool. 1580) 

A comprehensive lecture-seminar course covering the more recent litera- 
ture on experimental embryology and development physiology. Experimental 
studies treating with amphibian, chick and rodent development are designed 
as laboratory projects. Prerequisite: Biology 561 or equivalent. 

667. Animal Biology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zool. 1581) 

A lecture-laboratory course stressing fundamental concepts and principles 
of biology with the aim of strengthening the background of high school 
teachers. Emphasis is placed on the principles of animal origin, structure, 
function, development, and ecological relationships. 



126 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



GRADUATE COURSES IN BOTANY 



740. 
741. 
742. 
743. 
744. 

760. 
761. 
762. 
763. 
764. 
765. 
766. 

767. 

768. 
769. 
860. 
861. 
862. 

863. 



Essentials of Plant Anatomy. 

(Formerly Botany 1585) 

Applied Plant Ecology. 

(Formerly Botany 1586) 

Physiology of Vascular Plants. 

(Formerly Botany 1587) 

Developmental Plant Morphology. 

(Formerly Botany 5586) 

Plant Nutrition. 

(Formerly Botany 5587) 

GRADUATE COURSES IN ZOOLOGY 

Projects in Biology. 

(Formerly Zoology 1588) 

Seminar in Biology. 

(Formerly Zoology 1589) 

Applied Invertebrate Zoology. 

(Formerly Zoology 1590) 

Fundamentals of Vertebrate Morphology. 

(Formerly Zoology 1591) 

Basic Protozoology. 

(Formerly Zoology 1592) 

Introductory Experimental Zoology. 

(Formerly Zoology 1593) 

Invertebrate Biology for Elementary and Secondary 
School Teachers. 

(Formerly Zoology 1594) 

Genetics and Inheritance for the Secondary School 
Teacher. 

(Formerly Zoology 1595) 

Functional Invertebrate Zoology. 

(Formerly Zoology 1596) 

Cellular Physiology. 

(Formerly Zoology 1598) 

Parasitology. 

(Formerly Zoology 5585) 

Advanced Genetics. 

(Formerly Zoology 5588) 

Research in Botany. 

(Formerly Zoology 5592) 

or 
Research in Zoology. 

(Formerly Zoology 5593) 



Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(2-2) 

Credit 2(0-4) 
Credit 1(1-0) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(2-2) 

Credit 3(3-0) 

Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(1-4) 
Credit 4(2-4) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
3 Credit Hours 

3 Credit Hours 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 127 

GRADUATE COURSES IN BIOLOGY 

703. Experimental Methods in Biology. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly Zoology 1597) 

704. Seminar in Biology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zoology 1599) 

700. Environmental Biology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Zoology 1589) 

701. Biological Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Zoology 1590) 

702. Biological Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Zoology 1591) 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Walter W. Sullivan, Acting Chairman 

The Department of Chemistry offers two major curricula leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree. The curriculum of the professional major is 
designed to meet the needs of students planning to begin professional 
careers in chemistry upon graduation, to engage in further study in the 
field at the graduate level, or planning to enter medical, dental, or other 
professional schools. This program requires that the student complete 43* 
semester hours in basic chemistry courses and four to eight semester hours 
in advanced chemistry courses. The teaching major is designed to give the 
student a thorough foundation in chemistry while meeting the requirements 
for certification as a teacher at the secondary school level. It requires a 
minimum of 37* semester hours credit in chemistry. This curriculum differs 
from the customary teaching major in that it provides sufficient training 
for a professional career in chemistry or in teaching at the secondary school 
level. One who follows this curriculum could subsequently do bona fide work 
at the graduate level in chemistry. 

It is intended that the two curricula would be identical in the freshman 
and sophomore years so that a student need not reach a final decision 
regarding his choice of a profession until the beginning of the third year. 

Suggested Programs for Chemistry Majors 
PROFESSIONAL MAJOR CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Chemistry 106, 107 3 3 

Chemistry 116, 117 2 2 

Chemistry 108 1 — 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

Chemistry 231 — 2 

Chemistry 232 — 2 

Social Science 100 3 — 

Physical Education 1 1 

18 18 



•Students transferring into the Department after the freshman year may omit 
Chemistry 108. 



128 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 221, 222 3 

Chemistry 223, 224 2 

Mathematics 221, 222 4 

Physics 221, 222 5 

German 102, 103 3 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
2 
4 
5 
3 

17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 441, 442 3 

Chemistry 443, 444 ■ 1 

Chemistry 431 — 

Chemistry 432 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

German 425 3 

Zoology 160 4 

Electives 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 

1 
2 
2 
3 



16 



17 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 611 — 

Chemistry 403 2 

Botany 140 4 

Social Science 101 3 

Chemistry Electives 3 

Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 



13 



TEACHING MAJOR CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Chemistry 106, 107 3 

Chemistry 116, 117 2 

Chemistry 108 1 

Engilsh 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 

Social Science 100 3 

Chemistry 231 — 

Chemistry 232 — 

Health Education 200 — 

Physical Education 1 

18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
2 



19 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 



129 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Education 300, 301 2 2 

Chemistry 221, 222 3 3 

Chemistry 223, 224 2 2 

Social Science 101 — 3 

Mathematics 221, 222 4 4 

Physics 221, 222 5 5 

English 250 2 — 

Physical Education 1 — 



19 



19 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Ntimber Credit 

Chemistry 441, 442 3 

Chemistry 443, 444 1 

Chemistry 431 — 

Chemistry 432 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Education 400 — 

Psychology 320 3 

Zoology 160 4 

Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
1 
2 
2 
3 
3 



17 



14 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Botany 140 4 

Earth Science 309 3 

Psychology 436 3 

Education 500 — 

Education 535 — 

Education 560 — 

Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



13 



12 



COURSES IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

100. Physical Science. Credit 4(3-2) 

(Formerly Phy. Sc. 1601) 
A course for non-science majors devoted to a study of the physical 
universe and an understanding of matter, energy, and their transformations. 



130 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

COURSES IN CHEMISTRY 

Undergraduate 

101. General Chemistry I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1611) 

Introduction to the study of chemistry, atomic structure and periodicity, 
chemical bonding, states of matter and phase transitions, solutions, and 
electrolytes. This course is designed for majors in engineering, and other 
sciences. Chemistry majors may register for this course with departmental 
approval. 

102. General Chemistry II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1612) 

A continuation of general chemistry including an introduction to qualita- 
tive inorganic analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101. 

104. General Chemistry IV. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1615) 

Introduction to fundamental techniques and concepts in chemistry; in- 
cludes writing and interpretation of symbols, formulas, equations, atomic 
structure, composition, and reactions of inorganic compounds. This course 
is not open to majors in chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics and 
engineering. 

105. General Chemistry V. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1616) 

A study of elementary organic chemistry and the chemical changes which 
take place during life processes. Prerequisites: Chemistry 104 or equivalent. 

106. General Chemistry VI. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1618) 

A general chemistry course for chemistry majors which emphasizes basic 
principles and important theoretical concepts of chemistry. Emphasis is 
also placed on the development of manipulative skills in the laboratory. 
Topics discussed will include atomic structure, electronic configuration, 
wave mechanical model of atom, chemical bonding, states of matter, 
chemical equilibria, systems of acids and bases, electrochemistry. 

107. General Chemistry VII. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1619) 

A continuation of Chemistry 106. Includes chemistry of important metals 
and non-metals and a rigorous treatment of qualitative inorganic analysis. 

108. Chemistry Orientation. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1617) 

A series of lectures and discussions on the nature and requirements of 
and chemical profession; the application of chemistry to modern living; 
and other selected topics. 

111. General Chemistry I Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 
An introduction to quantitative studies of substances and chemical re- 
actions. Emphasis is also placed on the development of manipulative skills. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 101. 

112. General Chemistry II Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 
Continuation of Chemistry 111 with an introduction to qualitative analysis. 

Corequisite: Chemistry 102. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 131 

114. General Chemistry IV Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 

A study of inorganic reactions and substances and their relation to life 
processes. Corequisite: Chemistry 104. 

115. General Chemistry V Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 
A study of organic reactions and substances and their relation to life 

processes. Corequisite: Chemistry 105. 

116. General Chemistry VI Laboratory. Credit 2(0-6) 
A general chemistry laboratory for chemistry majors which emphasizes 

quantitative studies of substances and chemical reactions such as acid-base 
studies, redox reactions, and equilibrium reactions. Emphasis is also placed 
on the development of manipulative skills in the laboratory. Corequisite: 
Chemistry 106. 

117. General Chemistry VII Laboratory. Credit 2(0-6) 
A continuation of Chemistry 116 with an introduction to qualitative 

analysis. Corequisite: Chemistry 107. 

221. Organic Chemistry I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1621) 

A study of the hydrocarbons (aliphatic and aromatic) and introduction 
to their derivatives. Prerequisite: Chemistry 102, 105 or 107. 

222. Organic Chemistry II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1622) 

Continuation of the study of derivatives of hydrocarbons and the more 
complex compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 221. 

223. Organic Chemistry I Laboratory. Credit 2(0-6) 
This laboratory course emphasizes the study of physical and chemical 

properties of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Modern instrumentation 
such as gas and column chromatography, infrared and ultraviolet analyses 
are used. Corequisite: Chemistry 221. 

224. Organic Chemistry II Laboratory. Credit 2(0-6) 
A continuation of Chemistry 223. However, more emphasis is placed on 

syntheses and qualitative analysis of organic compounds. Corequisite: 
Chemistry 222. 

231. Quantitative Analysis I. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 331) 

Titrimetric and gravimetric analyses including theory and calculations 
associated with acid-base equilibria, oxidation-reduction, nucleation, and 
precipitation-complexation processes. Prerequisite: Chemistry 102 or 107, 
Mathematics 113 concurrently. 

232. Quantitative Analysis I Laboratory. Credit 2(0-6) 
This laboratory course emphasizes the basic principles of chemical 

separations. Laboratory studies of gravimetric and titrimetric analyses are 
also encountered. Corequisite: Chemistry 117, 231. 

251. Elementary Biochemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1624) 
A study of fundamental cellular constituents. Emphasis is placed on 
physiological applications and analyses. Prerequisites: Chemistry 105 or 
222. This course is open to non-chemistry majors only. 



132 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

252. Elementary Biochemistry Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 

Elementary biochemical reactions are studied with emphasis placed on 
applications to biology, home economics and nursing. Corequisite: Chemistry 
115 or 224, and 251. 

301. Current Trends in Chemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1641) 

A series of lectures and discussions on special problems in chemistry 
and of the chemical profession not covered in formal courses. 

403. Introduction to Chemical Research. Credit 2(0-6) 

(Formerly Chem. 1661) 
Makes use of the laboratory and library facilities in studying minor 
problems of research. Prerequisite: Advanced standing and permission of 
the Department. 

431. Quantitative Analysis II. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1662) 

A study of the theory and the operational features of some of the more 
important instruments that are currently being used as analytical tools 
such as ultraviolet, visible-light, and infrared spectrophotometers, electro- 
analytical instruments, thermometric titrators, fluorimeters, etc. Prereq- 
uisite: Chemistry 441. Corequisite: Chemistry 442. 

432. Quantitative Analysis II Laboratory. Credit 2(0-6) 
This laboratory course features the utilization of modern instruments 

such as ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectrophotometers. The student 
will also utilize electroanalytical instruments and thermometric titrators. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 431. 

441. Physical Chemistry I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1663) 

Atomic and nuclear structure, gaseous and crystalline states, physical 
properties and molecular structure, the laws of thermodynamics, studies of 
the liquid state, and solutions. Prerequisites: Physics 221, Math. 222, 
Chemistry 231, and Physics 222, concurrently. 

442. Physical Chemistry II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1664) 

A study of chemical kinetics, electric conductance, ionic, equilibria, 
chemical equilibria, phase diagrams, and colloids. Prerequisite: Chemistry 

441. 

443. Physical Chemistry I Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 
Thermodynamic and kinetic studies are emphasized in this course. Co- 
requisite: Chemistry 441. 

444. Physical Chemistry II Laboratory. Credit 1(0-3) 
A continuation of Chemistry 443. Corequisite: Chemistry 442. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

610. Inorganic Synthesis. Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly 1670) 
Discussion of theoretical principles of synthesis and development of 
manipulative skills in the synthesis of inorganic substances. Prerequisites: 
One year of organic chemistry; one semester of quantitative analysis. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 133 

611. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly 1671) 
A course in the theoretical approach to the systematization of inorganic 
chemistry. Prerequisites: Chemistry 441, 442, concurrent. 

624. Qualitative Organic Chemistry. Credit 5(3-6) 

(Formerly 1776) 

A course in the systematic identification of organic compounds. Prereq- 
uisite: One year of Organic Chemistry. 

631. Electroanalytical Chemistry. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 1781) 
A study of the theory and practice of polarography, chronopotentiometry, 
potential sweep chronoampereometry and electrodeposition. The theory of 
diffusion and electrode kinetics will also be discussed along with the factors 
which influence rate processes, the double layer, adsorption and catalytic 
reactions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 431 or equivalent. 

641. Radiochemistry. Credit 4(3-3) 
(Formerly 1782) 

A study of the fundamental concepts, processes, and applications of 
nuclear chemistry, including natural and artificial radioactivity, sources, and 
chemistry of the radioelements. Open to advanced majors and others with 
sufficient background in chemistry and physics. Prerequisites: Chemistry 
442 or Physics 406. 

642. Radioisotope Techniques and Applications. Credit 2(1-3) 
(Formerly 1783) 

The techniques of measuring and handling radioisotopes and their use in 
chemistry, biology, and other fields. Open to majors and non-majors. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 102 or 105 or 107. 

643. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 1784) 

Non-relativistic wave mechanics and its application to simple systems by 
means of the operator formulation. Prerequisites: Math. 222, Physics 222, 
and Chemistry 442 prior or concurrent. 

651. General Biochemistry. Credit 5(3-6) 

(Formerly 1780) 
A study of modern biochemistry. The course emphasizes chemical kinetics 
and energetics associated with biological reactions and includes a study of 
carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, nucleic acids, hormones, photo- 
synthesis, and respiration. Prerequisites: Chemistry 431 and 442. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

These courses are open to graduate students only. See the bulletin of the 
Graduate School for course descriptions. 

701. Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1098) 

702. Chemical Research. Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 
(Formerly Chem. 1085, 1086 & 1087) 

711. Structural Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Chem. 1685) 



134 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

715. Special Problems in Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 

(Formely Chem. 1088 & 1089) 

716. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1686) 

721. Elements of Organic Chemistry. Credit 3(2-3) 
(Formerly Chem. 1690) 

722. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Credit 4(4-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1691) 

723. Organic Reactions. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1692) 

725. Special Problems in Organic Chemistry. Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 
(Formerly Chem. 1090 & 1091) 

726. Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1693) 

727. Organic Preparations. Credit 1-3(0-2 to 6) 
(Formerly Chem. 1694) 

731. Modern Analytical Chemistry. Credit 3(2-3) 
(Formerly Chem. 1787) 

732. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. Credit 4(4-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1788) 

735. Special Problems in Analytical Chemistry. Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 
(Formerly Chem. 1092 & 1093) 

736. Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1786) 

741. Principles of Physical Chemistry I. Credit 4(3-3) 
(Formerly Chem. 1789) 

742. Principles of Physical Chemistry II. Credit 4(3-3) 
(Formerly Chem. 1790) 

743. Chemical Thermodynamics. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1791) 

744. Chemical Spectroscopy. Credit 3(2-3) 
(Formerly Chem. 1792) 

745. Special Problems in Physical Chemistry. Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 
(Formerly Chem. 1094 & 1095) 

746. Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1795) 

748. Colloid Chemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1794) 

749. Chemical Kinetics. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1793) 

755. Special Problems in Biochemistry. Credit 2-5(0-4 to 10) 
(Formerly Chem. 1096 & 1097) 

756. Selected Topics in Biochemistry. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Chem. 1695) 

799. Thesis Research. Credit 3 

(Formerly Chem. 1799) 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 135 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Herbert M. Heughan, Acting Chairman 

PURPOSE 

In conjunction with the overall purpose and philosophy of the University, 
the Department of Mathematics believes that its program should be geared 
to provide training in mathematics that will prepare the student for living 
and will meet the demands of a democratic and complex society. Its gradu- 
ates can emerge as capable, well adjusted citizens with a high degree of 
achievement and intellectual curiosity to cope with the dynamics of any 
mathematical environment into which they are placed. 

PROGRAMS AND OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Mathematics offers three programs leading to the 
bachelor of Science degree. 

The three programs are: the baccalaureate degree in engineering mathe- 
matics, the baccalaureate degree in mathematics and the baccalaureate 
degree in mathematics (teacher education). 

Students enrolled in either program must pass a comprehensive examina- 
tion in mathematics. 

Objectives of the Engineering Mathematics Program 

1. To prepare the student to do graduate study in applied mathematics. 

2. To prepare the student for service in industry and government. 

3. To prepare the student for independent investigations in the areas of 
science and mathematics. 

4. To inspire the student with the desire for continued growth in areas 
of mathematical inquiry. 

OBJECTIVES OF MATHEMATICS PROGRAM 

1. To prepare the student to do gradaute work in the area of mathe- 
matics. 

2. To prepare the student for independent investigation in the area of 
mathematics. 

3. To inspire the student with the desire for continued growth in areas 
of mathematical inquiry. 

Objectives of the Mathematics Program (Teacher Education) 

1. To prepare the student for graduate study in the area of mathematics 
and professional education. 

2. To prepare the teacher of mathematics to present mathematics in a 
modern, meaningful, stimulating manner at the secondary level. 

3. To prepare the teacher with sufficient quantity and quality of mathe- 
matics to provide competent counseling in the several opportunities 
available in mathematics. 



136 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



To develop in the teacher an appreciation for mathematical rigor, and 
an appreciation of mathematics as an art as well as a tool. 

To develop in the teacher an understanding of and an appreciation for 
the development of mathematics from antiquity to the present. 

To inspire in the prospective teacher a desire for continued growth 
in areas of mathematical inquiry. 



THE ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS PROGRAM 1 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 116, 117 5 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

English 100, 101 4 

Mechanical Engineering 101, 102 2 

Electives or Air or Military Science 1 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

5 
4 
4 
2 

1 

16 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 300, 500 4 

Mathematics 240, 440 3 

Physics 221, 222 5 

Social Science 100, 101 3 

Electives or Air or Military Science 2 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
5 
3 
2 

17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 511, 512 3 

Mathematics 507, 508 3 

Mechanical Engineering 441, 442 3 

English 250 2 

Physics 406 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Health Education 200 — 

Electives 3 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 



20 



♦Offered in cooperation with the School of Engineering. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 137 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Physics 400, 600 3 3 

Mathematics 224, Elective 3 3 

Mathematics 350,! 520 3 3 

Economics 301, 302 3 3 

Foreign Language (French or German) 3 3 

Electives 3 3 

18 18 

PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICS MAJOR 
Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 4 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Social Science 100, 101 3 3 

Education 100 1 — 

16 15 
Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 221, 222 4 4 

Geometry, Mathematics 350 3 3 

Physics 221, 222 5 5 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

English 250, Health Education 200 2 2 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 507 3 — 

Physics 406 — 3 

Foreign Language (French, German or Russian) 3 3 
*Electives (mathematics courses above 

Mathematics 507) 3 6 

Electives 6 3 

15 15 



*Must include 508 or 512. Total number of hours: 124 
Total number of hours in mathematics beyond Mathematics 111: 40 



138 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 505 1 

Mathematics 511 3 

*Electives (mathematics courses above 

Mathematics 507) 3 

Electives 9 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 

10 



16 13 
PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICS MAJOR (Teacher Education) 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 4 

*Science 4 4 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Education 100 1 — 

Social Science 100, 101 3 3 



17 
Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 221, 222 4 

Physics 225, 226 4 

Education 300, 301 2 

Psychology 320 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Health Education 200 2 

Mathematics 350 — 



16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
4 
2 

3 

3 



18 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 242, 224 3 

Foreign Language (French, German or Russian) 3 

Education 400 3 

Psychology 436 — 

English 250 2 

Mathematics 507 3 

Mathematics 511, 508 or 512 3 

Elective — 



16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



15 



*The Science requirement mav be any one of the following sequences: 

1. Chemistry 101-102 

2. Botany 140, Zoology 160 or Zoology 160, Botany 140 

3. Biological Science 100, Physical Science 100 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 139 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Electives (Mathematics) 6 — 

Mathematics 505 1 — 

Electives 6 — 

Education 500, 529, 560 — 12 

13 12 



COURSES IN MATHEMATICS 

Undergraduate 

100. Intermediate Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3600) 

Elementary properties of the real number system, basic algebra through 
quadratics. Required of students who fail the mathematics entrance exam- 
ination. Prerequisite: 1 Unit Algebra, 1 Unit High School Geometry. 

101. Freshman Mathematics I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3601) 

Axiomatic systems, algebraic structure of the real number system, basic 
algebra and trigonometry, introduction to analytic geometry and calculus. 
Prerequisites: 1 Unit High School Algebra, 1 Unit High School Plane 
Geometry and a passing score on the mathematics entrance examination. 

102. Freshman Mathematics II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3602) 

Continuation of Mathematics 101. Prerequisite: Math. 101. 

110. Preparatory Engineering Mathematics. Credit 4(4-2) 
(Formerly Math. 3610) 

Algebraic properties of the number systems, fundamental operations, 
exponents and radicals, functions and graphs, solutions of equations and 
systems of equations, trigonometric functions and identities, inequalities 
"logarithms, progressions, mathematical induction, binomial theorem, per- 
mutations and combination and determinants. Prerequisites: 1 unit of high 
school algebra and 1 unit of high school geometry. 

111. College Algebra and Trigonometry. Credit 4(4-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3611) 

Elementary logic and the abstract nature of mathematics; structure of 
the real number system, polynomials and rational functions; linear systems 
and matrices, inequalities; sets, relations functions; trigonometric, loga- 
rithmic, exponential functions. Prerequisites: 1 Unit Plane Geometry and 
2 Units of High School Algebra. 

112. Calculus for Non-Mathematics Majors. Credit 4(4-0) 
Basic ideas and concepts of calculus. Methods and techniques in differ- 
ential and integral calculus. Applications of calculus. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 102, 110 or 111. No credit towards a degree in mathematics. 



140 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

113. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3613) 
Analytic geometry of lines and circles; functions, limits and derivatives 
and applications, integrals and applications, infinite series, general analytic 
geometry of two and three dimension, functions of several variables, 
multiple integration, line and surface integral. Prerequisite: Math. Ill or 
Math. 110. 

115. Mathematics of Business and Finance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3615) 

Simple interest, discount, partial payments, payroll, wages and commis- 
sion accounts, discounts and mark-ups, retailing, taxes, distribution of 
ownership, transactions in corporate securities, insurance, compound in- 
terest, annuities, amortization and sinking funds. Prerequisites: Math. Ill 
or Math. 101, or Math. 110. 

116. Engineering Mathematics I. Credit 5(4-2) 
(Formerly Math. 3616) 

A review of the basic principles of preparatory engineering mathematics, 
analytic geometry of two and three space, differentiation coordinates, in- 
finite sequences and series, partial differentiation and multiple integrals. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 110 or two units algebra, one unit geometry, 
one-half unit trigonometry and a passing score on the placement examina- 
tion. 

117. Engineering Mathematics II. Credit 5(4-2) 
(Formerly Math. 3617) 

Continuation of Math. 116. Prerequisite: Math. 116. 

221. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Credit 4(4-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3621) 

Continuation of Math. 113. Prerequisite: 113. 

222. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Credit 4(4-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3622) 

Continuation of Math. 221. Prerequisite: 221. 

224. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3624) 
A general course covering fundamentals of statistics, central tendencies, 
variabilities, graphic methods, frequency distributions, correlations, reli- 
ability of measures, theory and methods of sampling, and the descriptive 
and analytical measures of statistics. Prerequisites: Math. 111. 

240. Introduction to the Programming of Digital Computers. 

(Formerly Math. 3641) Credit 3(2-2) 

Flow charts, machine language, eg. FORTRAN, preparation of cards and 
tapes, number systems, typical programs for solution on standard com- 
puters. Mathematical essentials for computer programming; e.g. approxi- 
mation methods, error functions, iteration schemes, and numerical solutions 
of equations. Prerequisite: Math. Ill or 102, 110. 

242. College Geometry. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3643) 
Postulational Systems. Euclid's Parallel Postulate. A brief study of non- 
Euclidean geometries. Euclidean Geometry as a special case of other 
geometries. Defects of Euclid's system. Prerequisite: High School Geometry 
and Math. 113 or Math. 116. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 141 

300. Ordinary Differential Equations. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3645) 
Solution of linear and non-linear differential equations with application to 
mechanics and electricity; introduction to elementary difference equations. 
Prerequisite: Math. 222 or Math. 117. 

350. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3667) 
Real and complex finite dimensional vector spaces, conjugate spaces, 
theory of linear transformation, linear operations, matrices, canonical repre- 
sentations, infinite dimensional space with an introduction to functional 
analysis. Prerequisite: Math. 221 or Math. 116. 

420. History of Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3620) 

A survey of the development of mathematics by chronological periods, 
with biographical references, illustrations of national and racial achieve- 
ments, and discussions of the evolution of certain important topics of 
elementary mathematics. Prerequisite: Math. 221. 

423. Theory of Equations. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3623) 
Methods of solving cubics, quartics and other higher algebraic equations. 
Methods of approximating roots, systems of equations, elements of determi- 
nants. Prerequisite: Math. 222. 

440. Numerical Methods. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Math. 3642) 

Study of numerical methods as related to programming techniques cover- 
ing the following topics, interpolation and extrapolation, approximate solu- 
tions of algebraic and transcendental equations, simultaneous linear equa- 
tions initial-value, characteristic-value, and boundary-value problems, partial 
differential equations of the hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic types. Co- 
requisite: Math. 240. 

500. Introduction to Applied Mathematics. Credit 4(4-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3646) 
Fourier Series and integrals, orthogonal polynomials, transform calculi, 
residue calculus, special function, boundary value problems, partial differen- 
tial equations, vectors. Prerequisite: Math. 300. 

505. Seminar in Mathematics. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3660) 
Methods of preparing and presenting seminars, presentation of seminars 
in current developments in mathematics and/or topics of interest which are 
not included in formal courses. Required of mathematics majors. Pre- 
requisite: Math. 507 or 511. 

507. Intermediate Analysis I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3662) 

A rigorous treatment of the fundamental principles of analysis; limits 
and continuity sequence and series, differentiability and integrability, analy- 
sis of function of several variables. Prerequisite: Math. 222 or Math. 117. 

508. Intermediate Analysis II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3663) 

Continuation of Math. 507. Prerequisite: Math. 507. 



142 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

511. Abstract Algebra I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3664) 

Elementary properties of sets, Peano axioms and the construction of the 
natural number system, properties of the integers, integral domains, groups, 
rings, fields, vector spaces, lattices and partially ordered sets. Prerequisite: 
Twenty hours of college mathematics. 

512. Abstract Algebra II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3665) 

Continuation of Math. 511. Prerequisite: Math. 511. 

520. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3668) 
Prerequisite: Math. 350. 

550. Vector Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3669) 
A study of the processes of vector analysis, with a treatment of the 
vector functions and operations as applied in theoretical work. Prerequisite: 
Math. 500. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

600. Introduction to Modern Mathematics for Secondary 

School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3670) 

Elementary theory of sets, elementary logic and postulational systems, 

nature and methods of mathematical proofs, structure of the real number 

system. Open only to inservice teachers, or by permission of Department 

of Mathematics. 

601. Algebraic Equations for Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3671) 

Algebra of sets, solution sets for elementary equations, linear equations 
and linear systems of equations, matrices and determinants with applica- 
tions to the solution of linear systems. Prerequisite: Math. 600. 

602. Modern Algebra for Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3672) 

Sets and mappings, properties of binary operations, groups, rings, in- 
tegral domains, vector spaces and fields. Prerequisite: Math. 600. 

603. Modern Analysis for Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3673) 

Properties of the real number system, functions, limits, sequencies, con- 
tinuity, differentiation and differentiability, integration and integrability. 
Prerequisite: Math. 600. 

604. Modern Geometry for Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3674) 

Re-examination of Euclidean geometry, axiomatic systems and the Hilbert 
axioms, introduction to projective geometry, other non-euclidean geometries. 
Prerequisite: Math. 600. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 143 

606. Mathematics for Chemists. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3676) 

This course will review those principles of mathematics which are in- 
volved in chemical computations and derivations from general through 
physical chemistry. It will include a study of significant figures, methods 
of expressing large and small numbers, algebraic operations, trigonometric 
functions, and an introduction to calculus. 

607. Theory of Numbers. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3677) 

Divisibility properties of the integers, Euclid algorithm, congruences, 
diophantine equations, number-theoretic functions, and continued fractions. 
Prerequisite: Twenty hours of college mathematics. 

608. Mathematics of Life Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3678) 

Probability, mortality table, life insurance, annuities, endowments, com- 
putation of net premiums, evaluation of policies, construction and use of 
tables. Prerequisite: Math. 224. 

620. Elements of Set Theory and Topology. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3682) 
Operations on sets, relations, correspondences, comparison of sets, func- 
tions, ordered sets, general topological spaces, metric spaces, continuity, 
connectivity, compactness, hormeomorphic spaces, general properties of T- 
spaces. Prerequisite: Math. 222. 

623. Advanced Probability and Statistics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3683) 

Introduction to probability, distribution functions and moment-generating 
functions, frequency distribution of two variables, development of chi- 
square, student's "T" and "F" distributions. Prerequisite: Math. 224 and 
117 or 222. 

624. Methods of Applied Statistics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3684) 

Presents the bases of various statistical procedures. Applications of 
normal, binomial, Poisson, chi-square, student's "T" and "F" distributions. 
Tests of hypotheses, power of tests, statistical inference, regression and 
correlation analysis and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: Math. 224. 

625. Modern Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Math. 3685) 

This course affords a background of the beginning numbers, concepts and 
counting, a study of various number bases, and fundamental processes and 
their application and problem solving. No credit toward a degree in mathe- 
matics. 

626. Modern Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II. Credit 3(3-0) 
Continuation of Math. 625. Prerequisite: Math. 625. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

700. Theory of Functions of A Real Variable I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Math. 3690) 



144 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



701. Theory of Functions of A Real Variable II. 

(Formerly Math. 3691) 

710. Theory of Functions of A Complex Variable I. 

(Formerly Math. 3692) 

711. Theory of Functions of A Complex Variable II. 

(Formerly Math. 3693) 

715. Projective Geometry. 

(Formerly Math. 3694) 

717. Special Topics in Algebra. 

(Formerly Math. 3695) 

720. Special Topics in Analysis. 

(Formerly Math. 3696) 



Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Donald A. Edwards, Chairman 



The specific objectives of the department are as follows: 

1. To prepare majors for graduate study. 

2. To prepare majors for work in research laboratories. 

3. To prepare majors to teach physics and mathematics in high school, 
who also have a competency in chemistry and biology. 

4. To provide majors in other departments with a clear understanding 
of the laws of physics and their applications. 

5. To provide all students with the ability to make meaningful observa- 
tions, to convert these observations into mathematical language, and 
to reach logical conclusions. 

Three options in physics are provided for our majors. The Professional 
Option is designed for students who plan to go to graduate school. The 
Engineering Option is for the student who plans to begin work with a 
bachelors degree. The Teaching Option is designed for the student who 
plans to teach in High School. 

Students who fail the entrance mathematics tests must attend Summer 
School at the end of the first year in order to graduate on schedule. Certain 
sequence courses require this. 

All majors are strongly urged to take English 102, Developmental Read- 
ing 1(1-0). This should be taken during the first semester of the freshman 
year if possible. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 



145 



TEACHING OPTION PROGRAM 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

History 100, 101 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 

Physical Education 1 

Education 100 1 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 

4 
4 
1 



17 



16 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Psychology 320 3 

Education 300 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Mathematics 221, 222 4 

Physics 221, 222 5 

English 250 2 

Health Education 200 — 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



2 
16 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 300 4 

Physics 400, 403 3 

Physics 406 3 

Physics 420, 421 1 

Education 301, 400 2 

Biology 140 — 

Electives — 

Zoology 160 4 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



17 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Education 560 — 

Education 500 — 

Physics 557 3 

Psychology 436 3 

Education 535 — 

Physics electives 6 

Mathematics 240 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

6 
3 



15 



12 



Minimum for Graduation 127 



146 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



PROFESSIONAL OPTION PROGRAM 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 100 1 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 116, 117 5 

History 100, 101 3 

Physics 221 — 

Electives 3 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 300, 500 4 

Physics 222 5 

Elective — 

Mathematics 240 — 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

German 102, 103 3 

Physics 400, 600 3 

Physics 406, 403 3 

Physics 401 3 

Physics 420, 421 1 

Electives 3 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 



1 
6 

16 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Physics 402 — 

Elective in Physics 3 

Physics 605, 606 3 

Physics 603, 604 3 

Physics 555, 556 3 

Electives — 

German 425 3 

15 
Minimum for Graduation 128 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 



147 



ENGINEERING PHYSICS OPTION PROGRAM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Physics 221 — 5 

Education 100 1 — 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 116, 117 5 5 

History 100, 101 3 3 

^Engineering Graphics 101 2 — 

15 17 
Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Physics 400, 402 3 3 

Physics 403 — 3 

Humanistics-social studies 3 — 

M. E. 335, 337 3 3 

Physics 406 3 — 

Electives in physics — 3 

E. E. 337, 452 4 4 

16 16 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mathematics 300, 500 4 4 

Physics 222 5 — 

Mathematics 240 — 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

M. E. 200 — 3 

16 17 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Electives, free 3 6 

Physics 555, 556 3 3 

Physics 420, 421 1 1 

M. E. 361 — 2 

Electives in physics 3 — 

Electives in engineering 4 3 

Humanistic-social studies 3 — 

17 15 
Minimum for Graduation 129 

*May be replaced by a physics course if department deems it necessary, but 101 must be 
taken later and as soon as possible. 



148 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

COURSES IN PHYSICS 

Undergraduate 

200. Introductory Physics. Credit 2(2-0) 
A non-laboratory course involving the study of mechanics, heat, electric- 
ity, wave motion, and atomic and nuclear phenomena. Recommended for 
students with poor high school preparation in physics who should prepare 
for College Physics or General Physics. 

201. Survey of Physics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Physics 3801) 

A one-semester study of selected topics in physics, including simple 
machines, heat, sound, electricity, and light. Prerequisite: Math. Ill or 102. 

211. Technical Physics I. Credit 4(2-4) 
A study of basic principles of mechanics, heat, wave motion, and sound. 

Emphasis is placed on applications of physics in modern technology. Pre- 
requisite: Math. 111. Corequisite: Math. 112. 

212. Technical Physics II. Credit 4(2-4) 
A continuation of Physics 211. Magnetism, electricity, light, and modern 

physics. Prerequisite: Physics 211. 

221. General Physics I. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Physics 3821) 

A study of the usual topics of physics with special emphasis on depth of 
understanding of basic principles. Includes one two-hour period per week 
for questions, problems, films, etc. Calculus used. Corequisite: Math. 117 
or 221. 

222. General Physics II. Credit 5(3-4) 
(Formerly Physics 3822) 

A continuation of Physics 221. Prerequisite: Physics 221. 

225. College Physics I. Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly Physics 3825) 

A study of the fundamental-principles of mechanics, properties of matter, 
heat and thermometry, magnetism, electricity, wave motion, sound, light, 
and atomic physics. Calculus not required. Prerequisite: Math. 113 or 116. 

226. College Physics II. Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly Physics 3826) 

A continuation of Physics 225. Prerequisite: Physics 225. 

250. Introduction to Astronomy. Credit 3(3-0) 

Descriptive astronomy, including methods of observation, classification, 
and analysis. Elementary celestial mechanics. Prerequisite: Physics 222. 

400. Physical Mechanics I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3840) 
An application of mathematical methods to motion of a particle, damped 
harmonic oscillator, central field motion, rotating coordinate systems, 
Fourier series, Lagrange's equations. Vector methods used. Prerequisite: 
Physics 222. Corequisite: Math. 300. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 149 

401. Mathematical Physics. Credit 3(3-0) 
Applications of mathematics to solution of physical problems. Selected 

topics in vector analysis, differential equations, special functions, calculus 
of variations, eigen- values and functions, matrices. Prerequisite: Math. 500. 

402. Thermodynamics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3842) 

Includes equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, entropy, fluid flow, 
heat transfer, single and two-phase mixtures, and statistical mechanics. 
Prerequisite: Physics 222. Corequisite: Math. 300. 

403. Electricity and Magnetism I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3843) 

Includes DC and AC circuitry theory, Gauss' Law, Poisson and Laplace 
equations, dielectric and magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations. Pre- 
requisites: Physics 222, Math. 300. 

404. Physical Optics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3844) 

Emphasis on wave phenomena. Includes propagation, reflection, refraction 
of light, lenses and optical instruments, interference, diffraction, polariza- 
tion, line spectra, thermal radiation. Prerequisites: Physics 222, Math. 117 
or 222. 

405. X-Ray Diffraction. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3845) 

An introductory course with emphasis upon the powder method, including 
x-ray sources, crystal shapes, and determination of unit cell parameters 
and atomic positions. Prerequisite: Physics 406 or special permission. 

406. Introduction to Modern Physics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 3846) 

Quantization of matter, electricity, radiation, atomic, structure, relativity, 
theory of solids, natural and artificial radioactivity. Prerequisites: Physics 
222 or 226, Math. 222 or 117. 

408. Solid State Physics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3848) 
Structure and imperfections in crystals and metals, energy levels of 
metals, semi-conductors and their applications, insulators. Prerequisite: 
222 and preferably 406. 

410. Introduction to Special Relativity. Credit 2(2-0) 

A study of the relativistic concepts of space and time. Relativistic 

kinematics, dynamics, and electromagnetic theory. Prerequisite: Physics 
406. 

420. Physics Seminar I. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3851) 

A study of current developments in physics. 

421. Physics Seminar II. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3852) 

A study of current developments in physics. 



150 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

430. Physics Research I. Variable 1-3 
(Formerly Physics 3853) 

Involves student participation in research conducted by staff. Prerequ- 
isite: Consent of staff. 

431. Physics Research II. Variable 1-3 
(Formerly Physics 3854) 

Involves student participation in research conducted by staff. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of staff. 

555. Advanced Laboratory I. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Physics 3865) 

A junior-senior level course with groups of experiments involving vacuum 
systems, magnetic resonance, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, and quantiza- 
tion of charge. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

556. Advanced Laboratory II. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly Physics 3866) 

A continuation of Advanced Laboratory I. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 

557. Advanced Laboratory III. Credit 3(0-6) 
A junior-senior level course involving the study and careful performance 

of a group of experiments in electronics devices as applied to physics. 
Prerequisite: Junior Classification. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

600. Physical Mechanics II. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Physics 3841) 
A continuation of Physics 400. Prerequisites: Physics 400, Math. 500. 

603. Electricity and Magnetism II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3872) 

A continuation of Physics 403. Prerequisites: Physics 403, Math. 500. 

604. Electricity and Magnetism III. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3873) 

A continuation of Physics 603. Prerequisite: Physics 603. 

605. Quantum Mechanics I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 3874) 

Postulates of wave mechanics and Schrondinger equation. Solutions of 
the Schrodinger equation for the harmonic oscillator, the square well, and 
the hydrogen atom. Concepts of spin and angular momentum. Approximate 
solutions of the Schrodinger equation, perturbation theory. Stark and 
Zeeman effects. Prerequisites: Physics 406 and Math. 500. 

606. Nuclear Physics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3875) 

Nuclear structure, nuclear interactions, radioactive decay, reactions and 
cross-sections, nuclear forces, and scattering theory. Prerequisites: Physics 
406, Math. 500. 



Division of Natural Science and Mathematics 151 

615. Quantum Mechanics II. Credit 3(3-0) 

The problem of one and two electron atoms. Hydrogen atom and the 
alkalis. The hydrogen molecule and the molecular bond. The deuteron 
problem in nuclear physics alpha decay. Scattering theory and the nature 
of the nuclear force. The motion of a particle in a periodic potential and 
the role of Quantum Mechanics in solids. Operator formalism. Prerequisite: 
Physics 605. 

705. General Physics for Science Teachers I. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Physics 3885) 

For persons engaged in teaching. Includes two hours of lecture demonstra- 
tion and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Empasis is placed upon 
understanding the basic principles of physics. Both courses may be com- 
bined during a single semester for double credit. For teachers only. Pre- 
requisite: College degree. 

706. General Physics for Science Teachers II. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Physics 3886) 

A continuation of Physics 705. 

707. Electricity for Science Teachers. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3887) 

Includes electric fields potentials, direct current circuits, chemical and 
thermal emf's electric meters, and alternating currents. For teachers. Pre- 
requisite: College Physics. 

708. Modern Physics for Science Teachers I. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3888) 

An introductory course covering the usual areas of modern physics. Both 
courses may be combined during a single semester for double credit. For 
teachers only. Prerequisite: College Physics. 

709. Modern Physics for Science Teachers II. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Physics 3880) 

A continuation of Physics 708. 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 



• DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

• DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

• DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

• DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Sidney H. Evans, Chairman 



The Department of Economics offers two majors: Economics and Agri- 
cultural Economics. The Agricultural Economics majors may choose to con- 
centrate in either Agricultural Business or Agricultural Science. The former 
is concerned with the business or industrial phase of agriculture; the latter 
group would be more interested in graduate study and research. The 
Economics major is organized to equip students for graduate study in the 
field; careers in government service, industry and labor. It also serves as 
an excellent background for the study of law. 

Economics 301, macro economics, and Economics 302, micro economics 
are prerequisites for all courses in economics excepting statistics. The 
sequence of required courses for individual students after prerequisites are 
met will be recommended by the student's advisor. In general, advance 
macro and micro courses will follow macro and micro principles respec- 
tively. Freshmen will be permitted to take courses in economics only on 
the recommendation of the advisor. 

It is suggested that majors in economics select minors from related 
disciplines. For those who are able to master higher mathematics it is 
strongly suggested as an excellent aid in theory. 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR ECONOMICS MAJORS 

Course Name 

Principles of Economics (macro Econ.) 
Principles of Economics (micro Econ.) 
Intermediate Economic Theory 
National Income Analysis 
Money and Banking 
Elementary Statistics 
Advanced Statistics 
Economic Seminar 

Electives from which at least 6 hours must be selected to complete the 
major requirements. 



Course No. 


Credit Hours 


Econ. 301 


3 


Econ. 302 


3 


Econ. 410 


3 


Econ. 420 


3 


Econ. 415 


3 


Econ. 305 


3 


Econ. 310 


3 


Econ. 525 


3 



Econ. 401 
Econ. 405 
Econ. 425 
Econ. 426 
Econ. 501 
Econ. 505 
Econ. 510 
Econ. 515 
Econ. 520 
Econ. 610 
Econ. 615 



3 Public Finance 

3 History of Econ/Thought 

3 Economics of Transporation 

3 Physical Distribution Analysis 

3 Labor Problems 

3 International Economic Relations 

3 Business Cycles 

3 Comparative Economic Systems 

3 Economic Development 

3 Consumer Economics 

3 Economic, Political and Social Aspects 
of the Black Experience 



155 



156 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC MAJORS 
CONCENTRATING IN AGRI-BUSINESS 

Course No. Credit Hours Course Name 

Econ. 301 3 Principles of Economics (macro Econ.) 

Econ. 302 3 Principles of Economics (micro Econ.) 

Ag. Econ. 330 3 Introduction to Agricultural Economics 

Ag. Econ. 332 3 Elements of Farm Management 

Ag. Econ. 334 3 Marketing Agricultural Products 

Ag. Econ. 436 3 Agricultural Prices 

Ag. Econ. 644 3 Statistical Methods in Agricultural 

Economics I 
Ag. Econ. 646 3 Statistical Methods in Agricultural 

Economics II 

At least fifteen hours of major electives must also be taken. 



REQUIRED COURSES FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC MAJORS 
CONCENTRATING IN AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 

Course Name 

Principles of Economics (macro Econ.) 
Principles of Economics (micro Econ.) 
Introduction to Agricultural Economics 
Elements of Farm Management 
Marketing Agricultural Products 
Agricultural Prices 
Intermediate Economic Theory 
Statistical Methods in Agricultural 

Economics I 
Statistical Methods in Agricultural 

Economics II 

At least nine hours of major electives must also be taken. 



Course No. 


Credit Hours 


Econ. 301 


3 


Econ. 302 


3 


Ag. Econ. 330 


3 


Ag. Econ. 332 


3 


Ag. Econ. 334 


3 


Ag. Econ. 436 


3 


Ag. Econ. 438 


3 


Ag. Econ. 644 


3 


Ag. Econ. 648 


3 



PROGRAM FOR ECONOMIC MAJORS 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Physical Science 100 — 

Military Science 101 102 or Air Science 101, 102 

or Electives 1 

Physical Eduaction (Men) 101, 103 1 

Physial Education (Women) 102, 104 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 



16 



Division of Social Sciences 



157 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

French 100, 101 or German 102, 103 or 

Spanish 104, 105 3 

Physical Education 200 2 

Air Science 201, 202 or Military Science 201, 202 

or Electives — 

Military Science 201, 202 or Electives 1 

English 250 — 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Economics 305, 310 3 

*Social Science Elective — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 



17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Economics 410, Econ. or other elective 3 

Economics 415, Econ. Elective 3 

Economics 420, Econ. Elective 3 

Social Science or Bus. Elective 3 

Social Science, Bus. or Math. Elective 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



15 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 
Credit 



Course and Number 

Economics 525 — 

*At least 27 hours of free electives 15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 

12 



15 



15 



PROGRAM FOR AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC MAJORS 
CONCENTRATING IN AGRI-BUSINESS 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

History 100, 101 3 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 

Physical Science 100 4 

Biological Science 100 — 

Air or Military Science or Electives 1 

Education 100 1 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 

4 



17 



16 



*History, Political Science, Sociology, Psychology, Business, etc. Although mathematics 
beyond the basic courses, at this point is not mandatory, it is strongly suggested. We also 
strongly recommend a course in Computer Programming. 

"Offered in cooperation with the School of Agriculture. 



158 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Physical Education 200 2 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Psychology 323 — 

Ag. Econ. 330 3 

Animal Husbandry 301; Dairy Husbandry 302; 

Plant Sc. 110 or Poultry Husbandry 317 3 

Ag. Econ. 644 — 

Air or Military Science or Electives 2 

16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 
3 

2 

17 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Ag. Econ. 332, 334 3 

Accounting 321, 322 3 

English 250 — 

Sociology 203 3 

Electives (Major Area) 4 

Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
2 

6 
3 



16 



17 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Ag. Econ. 436, 646 3 

Business Administration 451, 452 3 

Business Administration 572 — 

Business Administration 572 — 

Electives (Major Area), Ag. Econ. 438 5 

Electives (Technical Agriculture) 4 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



15 



Fifteen (15) hours of major electives — Major electives will be selected from 
the following courses: 



Ag. 


Econ. 


442 


(3) 


Ag. 


Econ. 


530 


(3) 


Ag. 


Econ. 


532 


(3) 



Ag. 


Econ. 


632 


(3) 


Ag. 


Econ. 


638 


(3) 


Ag. 


Econ. 


642 


(3) 


Ag. 


Econ. 


646 


(3) 



Division of Social Sciences 



159 



PROGRAM FOR ARICULTURAL ECONOMIC MAJORS 
CONCENTRATING IN AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 100 1 

English 100, 101 4 

Social Science 100, 101 3 

Botany 140, Zoology 160 4 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 

Air or Military Science or electives 1 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Ag. Econ. 330, 332 3 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 

Ag. Engineering 113 3 

Animal Husbandry 301 — 

Plant Sc. 110 or Poultry Husbandry 317 3 

Air or Military Science or electives 2 

15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 

4 



3 
3 
2 

15 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Ag. Econ. 334 3 

Economics 301 3 

Economics 302 — 

Accounting 221, 222 3 

English 250 — 

Sociology 203 3 

Foreign Language 3 

18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 
15 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Ag. Econ. 436, 644 3 

Ag. Econ. 646 — 

Business Administration 451, 452 3 

Mathematics 117 4 

Ag. Econ. 438 — 

Electives, major area 6 

16 

♦Offered in cooperation with the School of Agriculture. 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 



3 

6 

18 



Ag. 


Econ. 


440 


(3) 


Ag. 


Econ. 


530 


(3) 


Ag. 


Econ. 


532 


(3) 


Ag. 


Econ. 


632 


(3) 



160 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Nine (9) hours of major electives — Major electives will be selected from the 
following courses: 

Ag. Econ. 638 (3) 

Ag. Econ. 642 (3) 

Ag. Econ. 648 (3) 

A. A. 572 (3) 

COURSES IN ECONOMICS 
Undergraduate 

301. Principles of Economics, (macro Ec.) Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ec. 2840) 

An introduction to the meaning and scope of economics, economics term- 
inology, and the basic principles as they apply to the whole economy.* 

302. Principles of Economics, (micro Ec.) Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Ec. 2841) 

An introductory approach to the principles of economics as they relate to 
individual segments of the society. Emphasis will be placed on diminishing 
returns, supply, demand and market structures.* 

305. Elementary Statistics. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ec. 2865) 
An introduction to research methods; measures of central tendency; 
dispersion and sampling techniques. 

310. Advanced Statistics. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ec. 2866) 
Time series analysis; simple correlation for grouped and ungrouped data; 
advanced study of statistical inference. Prerequisite: Economics 305 (suc- 
cessfully passed). 

401. Public Finance. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2844) 
An analysis is made of the way federal, state, and local government obtain 
and spend their revenues. Tax theories, incidence and impact are covered. 
Factors influencing government fiscal policies. 

405. History of Economic Thought. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2842) 
A survey of the history of economic thought from the Middle Ages to 
John M. Keynes. The course aims to show how, and under what conditions 
the more important laws and theories became a part of the body of modern 
economics. 

410. Intermediate Economic Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2860) 
Allocation of resources and distribution of income within various market 
structures, with emphasis on analytical tools. 

415. Money and Banking. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2864) 
A general survey of the role of banking in the economy; the nature of 
money and international exchange. 



"Either course can be pursued independent of the other. 



Division of Social Sciences 161 

420. National Income Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2862) 
An introduction to the modern theory of the determination of the level of 
income, employment, and prices; the various theories of money and interest; 
fiscal and monetary policy. 

425. Economics of Transportation. Credit 3(3-0) 
This course traces the historic development of our nation's transportation 

system, its role in economic development and its influence on the growth of 
urban places. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding of the Socio- 
economic impact of the industry. The relationship of transportation prob- 
lems to other urban concerns will be explored. 

426. Physical Distribution Analysis. Credit 3(3-0) 
Analysis of alternative sources of transportation, economics of movement 

of goods, both in and out of the firm, integration of transportation with 
production flow, inventory management, warehousing, marketing policies, 
plant location, with special reference to location theory. 

501. Labor Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2863) 
An introductory course dealing with the efforts of working people to im- 
prove their relative position in the economy; the influence of unionism and 
of government participation are emphasized. The role of management. 

505. International Economic Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2867) 
National specialization and international exchange. The history and 
significance of international trade among nations of the world. 

510. Business Cycles. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2868) 
The general instability of capitalism and its causes, seasonal fluctuations 
and the secular trend. Business cycle history and theories. The influence of 
cycles on government fiscal policy. 

515. Comparative Economic Systems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2877) 
A description and analytical study of the various systems that have 
developed in different countries at different times; motivations, production 
and distribution patterns. 

520. Economic Development. Credit 3(3-0) 

(New Course) 
This course surveys the problem of economic growth and development in 
modern times and analyzes the present efforts to increase the rate of eco- 
nomic growth. Selected case studies will be drawn from both highly de- 
veloped nations and lesser developed nations. Special emphasis will be given 
to disproportioned growth in sectors of the United States' economy. 

525. Economic Seminar. Credit 3(3-0) 

(New Course) 
The use of economic tools in delineating, analyzing and presenting eco- 
nomic problems that are not included in other courses. This course will 
include also an exposure to recent developments in economics. 



162 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Courses Offered To Advance Undergraduates and Graduates 
610. Consumer Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the nature, scope 
and tools of Consumer Economics. It is particularly oriented to minority- 
groups, thus focusing on the economic choices currently facting groups with 
rising incomes and aspirations. The course will consider the economic choices 
faced by consumers in maximizing satisfaction with limited means. 

615. Economic, Political and Social Aspects of the 

Black Experience. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the political, economic and social tools of current public policy 
treating the subject of race in America. The course will examine the 
economic and social conditions of income inequality and explore the national 
commitment to equal opportunity. Special emphasis will be placed on 
illustrations from North Carolina and adjacent states. 

Courses Offered to Graduate Students 

601. Economic Understanding. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 2876) 

An analysis of the institutional organization and functions of the 
American Economy. Special references will be made to the state of North 
Carolina. A prerequisite for all graduate students who had no under- 
graduate courses in Economics and wish to take the graduate courses in 
economics. 

701. Labor and Industrial Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 5882) 

Two important sectors of the economy are examined — Labor and Man- 
agement. Historical, public and governmental influences are studied. 

705. Government Economic Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ec. 5883) 

This course will consider the growth of public expenditures and revenues, 
and debt of the United States; theories of taxation and tax incidence; and 
the effects of public expenditures and taxes on economic growth. 

710. Economic Development and Resource Use. Credit 3(3-0) 

(New Course) 

This course deals with resource and economic development in the domestic 
economy and also a comparison drawn among developed, developing and 
undeveloped societies. 

720. Development of Economic Systems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(New Course) 

An analytical approach to the study of various Economic systems, how 
these systems developed and how they are organized to carry on economic 
activity. 



Division of Social Sciences 163 

COURSES IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Undergraduate 

330. Introduction to Agricultural Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1121) 
An application of the fundamental principles of economics to agricultural 
production, marketing, land tenure, leasing arrangements, financing and 
related economic problems. 

332. Elements of Farm Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1122) 
Principles which govern the effective organization and operation of the 
farm firm. 

334. Marketing Agricultural Products. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1141) 
Principles and practices of marketing as applied to farm commodities. 
Form, place, time and possession utility, the ultimate consumer's market, 
the agricultural industries market, the middleman system, exchange market 
operation and futures contracts, price determination, reducing marketing 
costs. Visits will be made to local markets. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 330. 

336. Agricultural Prices. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1142) 
Information regarding agricultural price changes, index numbers, price 
determination, seasonal and cyclical price movements, storage problems, 
and other methods of controlling extreme price fluctuations, government 
price policy. 

440. Resource Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1162) 
Analysis of Economic problems of resources use and management. 
Perception of and definition of problems in terms of allocation mechanism. 
Analysis of Economic relationships over time and market externalities with 
emphasis on welfare implications. Prerequisite: Economics 302. 

442. Cooperative Marketing. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1163) 
Early cooperative movements, principles of cooperatives, importance of 
cooperatives in the United States, problems of organization, management 
and operation of cooperative endeavors by farmers in buying and selling. 
Prerequisites: Ag. Econ. 330, 334. 

444. Marketing Dairy Products. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1164) 
Economic problems in procuring milk and cream, in processing and dis- 
tributing fluid milk, cream and manufacturing dairy products; marketing 
legislation, market news, market methods, including cooperation, consumer 
demand and price policy. Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 334. 

530. Economics of Food Distribution. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1165) 
Description of market structures and operations in the processing, whole- 
sale and retail distribution of food. The effect of industrial organization 
and government regulations on the efficiency of the market and consumers 
demand for food. 



164 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

532. Agricultural Economics Research. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1166) 
Review of different types of research methodology used in the field of 
Agricultural Economics. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

630. Southern Resources in a Changing Economy — A Seminar. 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1170) Credit 3(3-0) 

Trends and the formulation of economic and social problems in the South 
and particularly in North Carolina; labor and capital mobility, agricultural 
as compared with the industrial, the problem of underemployment, and im- 
portant phases of current economic development. Prerequisites: Economics 
301, Sociology 203 or Ag. Econ. 330. 

632. Agri-Business Policy. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1171) 
The place of Agri-business in the National and International economy; 
the impact of public policy on the industry. An analysis of policy as it 
relates to, price support programs, finance, trade and resource development. 
Prerequisite: Ag. Econ. 330. 

634. Commodity Marketing Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1172) 
Economic problems arising out of the demand, supply and distribution of 
specific agricultural commodities; the price making mechanism, marketing 
methods, grades, values, price, cost, and governmental policy. Not more than 
two commodities will be studied in any one quarter. Selection of commodities 
and emphasis on problem areas will be made on the basis of current need; 
commodities studied will be cotton, tobacco, fruits and vegetables, and 
grains. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 

636. Seminar in Marketing Farm Products. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1173) 
Discussion, reports, consultation and research efforts which throw light 
on marketing problems of low income farmers in North Carolina, including 
National and International importance of locally grown products such as 
tobacco and cotton. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 

638. Special Problems in Agricultural Economics. Credit 3(1-2) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1174) 
Designed for students who desire to work out special problems in the 
field of agricultural economics; problem definition, formulation and investi- 
gation. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 

640. Agri-Business Management. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1175) 
Methods of research, plans, organization, and the application of manage- 
ment principles. Part of the student's time will be spent in consultation with 
Agri-business firms. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 

642. Seminar in Agricultural Economics. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1176) 
Discussion reports and an appraisal of current literature on agricultural 
problems. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chairman. 



Division of Social Sciences 165 

644. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics I. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1177) 
Statistical methods with special applications to agricultural problems. The 
statistical table, ratios, percentages, bar charts, line charts, and frequency 
distribution are used as analytical tools. Prerequisites: Ag. Econ. 330, Econ. 
301 or Sociology 203. 

646. Statistical Methods in Agricultural Economics II. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1178) 
Statistical methods with special applications to agricultural problems. 
The time series analysis, sampling theory, analysis of variance, and simple 
correlation are used as analytical tools. This course is a continuation of 
Ag. Econ. 644. 

648. Appraisal and Finance of Agri-Business Firms. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Ag. Ec. 1179) 
Principles of land evaluation, appraisal and taxation. The role of credit in 
a money economy, classification of credit, principles underlying the economic 
use of credit. The role of the government in the field of credit. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Frank H. White, Acting Chairman 

The Department of History offers two majors: history and social studies. 
The major in social studies is offered with the assistance of other depart- 
ments. 

The requirements for the bachelor's degree in history are under two 
plans: one for the general major in history without the education require- 
ments for teacher preparation; one for prospective teachers. The social 
studies major is also designed for students preparing to teach. 

The department seeks to develop in the student the power of analysis, 
judgment, and expression in dealing with multiple factors in social de- 
velopment. 

The department has a three-fold purpose: 

1. to contribute to the general education of a student so that he will be 
not only knowledgeable of social evolution, but will also be able to 
perform effectively and responsibly in human society at the local 
national and world levels. 

2. to offer courses which contribute to the preparation of students for 
teaching, law, the ministry, the foreign service, research and 
journalism. 

3. to prepare the student for graduate study. 

DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

History: Thirty hours in history courses (200 level or above) including 
204, 205, 303, 304 and eighteen hours of social sciences in at least three 
fields (economics, political science, sociology, anthropology and geography). 



166 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Social Studies: Forty-five hours in social sciences. A minimum of twenty- 
one hours in history must include 204, 205, 303, 304, and three (3) electives 
in history. A minimum of twenty-four hours in social sciences must include 
economics 301, 302; political science 330, 441; sociology 203, 204. 

MAJOR IN HISTORY 



(Teaching) 
Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101, 105 or 107 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Physical Science 100 ■ — 

Education 100 1 

Physical Education 101, 103 (Men) 

or 102 104 (Women) 1 

*English 102 1 

**Electives 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
3 



19 
Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course, and Number Credit 

English 250 2 

Education 300, 301 2 

French 100, 101 or German 102, 103 3 

History 204, 205 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 320 — 

Health Education 200 — 

Philosophy 260, 261 or 262 3 

**Electives 2 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Education 400 3 

History 303, 304 3 

History electives 3 

Electives — Sociology, Anthropology, 

Geography 3 

Political Science 330 3 

Psychology 436 — 



18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



18 



•Recommended for prospective history majors. 
**The Freshman-Sophomore elective consider the possible choice of Air Science or Military 
Science. 



Division of Social Sciences 



167 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

History elective 9 

Political Science elective 3 

Education 500, 536, 560 — 

Electives 3 

15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



12 



12 



MAJOR IN HISTORY 



(Non-Teaching) 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101, 105 or 107 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Physical Science 100 — 

Education 100 1 

Physical Education 101, 103 (Men) or 

102, 104 (Women) 1 

*English 102 2 

**Electives — 

18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
3 



18 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Speech 250 2 

French 100, 101 or German 102, 103 3 

History 204, 205 3 

Philosophy 260, 261 or 262 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Health Education 200 2 

History elective — 

**Electives 2 

18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 

2 

17 



♦Recommended for prospective history majors. 
**The Freshman-Sophomore elective consider the possible choice of Air Science or Military 
Science. 



168 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

History 303, 304 3 

Sociology 203, 204 3 

History elective — 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Political Science 330 (elective in political science) 3 

Philosophy 260 3 

Electives (Foreign Language) 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



18 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

History electives 6 

Geography elective 3 

Elective (Business Law 451) — 

Electives 6 



18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 
MAJOR IN SOCIAL STUDIES 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 100, 101, 105, 107 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Physical Science 100 — 

Education 100 1 

Physical Education 101, 103 (Men) 1 

Physical Education 102, 104 (Women) 1 

^English 102 — 

**Electives 2 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Foreign Language 3 

Education 300, 301 2 

Speech 250 2 

History 204, 205 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Sociology — 

**Electives 2 

Health Education — 



15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
2 

3 
3 

3 

2 
2 



18 



18 



* Recommended for prospective social studies majors. 
**The Freshman-Sophomore elective consider the possible choice of Air Science or Military 
Science. 



Division of Social Sciences 



169 



Junior Year 

Fall Semestc 
Course and Number Credit 

Sociology 204 3 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Education 400 3 

History 303, 304 3 

Political Science 330, 441 3 

History elective — 

Psychology 436 — 

Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



18 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

History elective 6 

Geography or Anthropology 3 

Education 500, 536, 560 — 

Electives 6 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



12 



15 



12 



COURSES IN HISTORY 



Undergraduate 

100. History of World Civilization— Part I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Soc. Sc. 2800) 
A freshman survey course in World Civilization. Part I treats the period 
from the Ancient World through the 17th Century. 



101. 



Credit 3(3-0) 



History of World Civilization — Part II. 

(Formerly Soc. Sc. 2801) 
A continuation of World Civilization treating the period from the Age of 
Enlightenment to the present. 

10.5. History of Africa. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly History 2802) 
A study of basic information about Africa: the geography of the con- 
tinent, the characteristics of the population, the varying social structures, 
the natural resources, and the multiplicity of languages. Treated also in a 
thorough manner is the effect of European encroachment. 

107. Religions and Civilization. 

(Formerly History 2806) 
A course that surveys the origins and development of the traditional 
religions of India and China and the three "Religions of the Book": 
Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. 



204. 



Credit 3(3-0) 



United States From 1492-1865. 

(Formerly History 2822) 
A survey of the social, political and economic forces resulting in the 
development of the American Nation. 



170 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

205. United States Since 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 2823) 

A synthesis of social, cultural, economic and political forces affecting the 
United States since 1865. 

206. The Afro-American in The United States to 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 2825) 

The African background, American slavery, abolition movement, social 
and cultural forces in the development of the Negro in the United States. 

207. The Afro-American in The United States Since 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 
A continuation of History 206. Particular emphasis is placed upon the 

struggle for equality. 

208. History of North Carolina. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 2826) 

A general survey of North Carolina from colonial times to the present. 

209. Africa South of the Sahara. Credit 3(3-0) 
The formation of West African states, the European impact on the social, 

political, and cultural African institutions. African nationalism and the 
formation of new African nations. 

300. Ancient History. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 400) 

A brief survey of Egyptian, Babylonian, and Hebrew Civilization. Em- 
phasis will be placed on the cultural, political, and economic development 
of Greece and Rome. 

301. Medieval History. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 401) 

Emphasis is placed on the rise and decline of the universal church, 
feudalism, the rise of towns, and the development of centralized govern- 
ments. 

302. The Renaissance and the Reformation. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly History 402) 
A study of the background, causes and progress of the intellectual and 
cultural movements in Europe in the fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth 
centuries. Emphasis will also be placed on the influence of the renaissance 
on the events leading to the world conflicts of the sixteenth century. 

303. Europe 1648-1815. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 403) 
This course deals with such major themes as the Age of Louis XIV, 
Eighteenth Century Enlightenment, The Old Regime, the French Revolution 
and Napoleon. 

304. Modern Europe Since 1815. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly History 404) 
A survey emphasizing main trends in European development; political 
and social impact of the French Revolution; Industrial Revolution; 
authoritarianism vs. liberalism; church vs. state; nationalism; imperialism; 
World Wars I and II; Communism, Nazism, present-day Europe. 



Division of Social Sciences 171 

312. Blacks in the Caribbean. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly History 110) 
A history of the social, economic and political development of Blacks in 
the West Indies and the Caribbean. 

325. History of Colonial Latin America. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 502) 

A survey dealing with the exploration and settlement, political, economic, 
and social development of Latin America concluding with the wars for 
independence. 

326. History of Republican Latin America. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 502) 

A continuation covering Latin America History from independence to 
the present time. 

330. History of The Far East I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 503) 

A survey of the history and culture of the Chinese and Japanese peoples 
from the classical civilization to the arrival of European nations. 

331. History of The Far East II. Credit .3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 504) 

A study of the modern history of the Far East, an analysis of the re- 
action of China, Japan, and Korea to the western powers and the growth 
of these nations into modern powers. 

334. Honors in History. Credit 3(3-0) 

Intensive reading and study in the field of history. For history majors 
with a 3.0 average. 

405. History of England. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly History 2855) 
A study of English institutions and concepts that influenced the Western 
World, and particularly America. Concentration of The Tudor and Stuart 
periods in the survey of institutions, and British imperialism as the basis 
for present world problems. 

407. American Diplomatic History. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2857) 
A study of the relations of the United States with other nations with 
special reference to the development and use of the economic, political, 
social, military, and naval power necessary to give support to policy. 

410. American Constitutional History. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly History 500) 
A study of the constitutional development of the United States from the 
adoption of the Constitution to the present time. 

416. History of Black Culture in the United States. Credit 3(3-0) 

Focus on early cultural developments, folk culture, and religion in 
antebellum America; social and cultural trends in the twentieth century; 
the "Harlem Renaissance"; Urban life. 

420. Seminar: Urban America. Credit 3(3-0) 

Special topics in the rise of the American city and the development of 

urban patterns of life. Concentration on such themes as population shifts 



172 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

to the cities, the development of slums and ghettos, growth of municipal 
institutions and services, and the relationship of government with city 
residents. (Prerequisite: 205 and consent of the instructor.) 

440. History of Russia. Credit 3(3-0) 
A study of Tsarist Russia from the Reign of Peter the Great to the end 

of the Tsarist rule. Emphasis is on those characteristics which contribute 
to the understanding of contemporary Russia. 

441. Russia in the Twentieth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 406) 

After a survey of the background to the Revolution of 1917, topics include 
the Bolshevik Revolution, subsequent development and expansion of the 
Soviet Union. 

460. Seminar on Southeast Asia. Credit 3(3-0) 

A consideration and analysis of colonialism in the area; the emergence 
of the new nations from control by European rivals and the background of 
American presence in Southeast Asia. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

600. The British Colonies and the American Revolution. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly History 2878) 
The evolution of colonial institutions, growth of the American colonies, 
the American Revolution and its aftermath. 

603. The Civil War and Reconstruction. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 2881) 

This course begins with a summary of the Civil War. It then treats the 
historiography of the Reconstruction period, the reconstruction of the South, 
and the restoration of the Union. 

604. Contemporary History of the United States. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly History 2882) 
The United States from the Great Depression of the 1930's to the present. 
Depression, New Deal, prosperity, Second World War, Cold War, and 
problems of contemporary America. 

605. The Soviet Union Since 1917. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 2883) 

A discussion of the ideological background of the Soviet Union with 
emphasis on the doctrines of Marx, Engels, and Lenin. This is followed by 
events leading up to the revolution of 1917 and the establishment of Com- 
munist autocracy, the new economic policy, the first Five-year Plan, Stalin's 
doctrine, and Soviet Communism since the death of Stalin. 

615. Seminar in the History of Black Americans. Credit 3(3-0) 
A reading and discussion course which gives concentrated attention to 

various aspects of the life and history of the Afro-Americans. 

616. Seminar in African History. Credit 3(3-0) 
Reading and discussion of selected topics in the history of Africa. 

620. American Social and Cultural Forces to 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of the social and cultural forces in the development of society 
in the United States to 1865. 



Division of Social Sciences 



173 



621. Social and Cultural Forces in the United States 

Since 1865. Credit 3(3-0) 

A continuation of History 620. It is also open to those who wish to take 
the course separately. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

700. The French Revolution and Napoleon. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2888) 

701. Recent United State Diplomatic History. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2889) 

702. Social and Political History of England 

From 1714-1832. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2890) 

703. History of Nineteenth Century Europe. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 2891) 

704. United States in The Early Twentieth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 2894) 

706. Independent Study in History. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 2894) 

707. Europe Since 1914. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly History 2895) 

712. The Black American in The Twentieth Century. Credit 3(3-0) 

730. Seminar in History. Credit 3(3-0) 

PHILOSOPHY 



Undergraduate 



Credit 3(3-0) 



260. Introduction to Philosophy. 

(Formerly Phil. 2904) 
An introductory course covering such topics as theories of reality, the 
nature of mind and knowledge, and the higher values of life. 

261. History of Philosophy. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2905) 

The history of philosophic thought is traced from ancient Greek philos- 
ophers to modern philosophers through Hegel. 

262. Logic. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2906) 

An introductory course designed to give a critical analysis of the prin- 
ciples, problems and fallacies in reasoning. 



Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 



Credit 3(3-0) 



608. Culture and Value. 

(Formerly 5970) 
A critical study of the nature and justification of basic ethical concepts 
in light of historical thought. 



174 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

609. Contemporary Philosophy. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 5971) 

A critical investigation of some contemporary movements in philosophy 
with special emphasis on existentialism, pragmatism, and positivism. 

COURSES IN GEOGRAPHY 

Undergraduate 

200. Principles of Geography. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Geography 518) 
A survey of the principles of geography. 

210. World Regional Geography. Credit 3(3-0) 

A survey of the geographic character of the major culture regions of the 

world. Contemporary cultural characteristics are examined within the 

framework of both environmental relationships and historical development. 

319. Regional Geography of Anglo- America. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Geography 519) 
A study of the geographic regions of the United States and Canada. 

320. Economic Geography of Latin America. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Geography 520) 

The agricultural and industrial resources of Latin America, including 
the utilization of Negro labor, and the assimilation of African culture into 
Latin-American life. 

321. Political Geography. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Geography 521) 

Theories of political geography; territorial changes and their political 
significance; problems in political unification, centralization and federation. 
Prerequisite: Political Science 2829 or 2941. 

322. Economic Geography. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Geography 522) 

A geographical survey of major economic activities as agriculture, 
forestry, fishing, mining, manufacturing, and commerce. Emphasis is placed 
upon areal patterns of production and exchange. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

605. Physical Geography I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2811) 

A study of the surface of the earth, including means of representation 
of the earth's surface, physical elements of weather and climate, climatic 
regions, and the earth's waters and elements. 

606. Physical Geography II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2812) 

A continuation of Physical Geography I concentrating on climate and 
weather, natural vegetation and animal life, soils and association of physical 
landscape attributes. 



Division of Social Sciences 175 

610. Topics in Geography of Anglo- America. Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected topics in cultural geography of the United States and Canada 
are studied intensively. Emphasis is placed upon individual reading and 
research and upon group discussion. 

620. Topics in World Geography. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 720) 
Selected topics in world geography are studied intensively. Concern is 
for cultural characteristics and their interrelationships with each other and 
with habitat. Emphasis is upon reading, research, and discussion. 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Virgil C. Stroud, Chairman 

In keeping with the general objectives of the University, the offerings 
in this department are designed to accomplish the objectives listed below 
with respect to the Political Science major. 

THE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 

The Political Science major is designed to impart to students a back- 
ground and understanding of the various aspects of government and their 
operation, to impart to students a background whereby they may do further 
study leading to careers in government, and to serve as prelaw preparation 
for those desiring to choose law as a career, as well as preparation for 
graduate study other than law. 

A major in the area of Political Science requires a minimum of 30 
semester hours. 

A minor may be secured in Political Science. 

A minimum of 124 hours are needed for graduation. 

Specific Objectives of the Department of Political Science 

1. To develop a basic understanding of man as a political entity. 

2. To develop a basic understanding of the operation of government at 
various levels. 

3. To develop competence in the language and skills of the discipline. 

4. To develop an inclination among the students to keep abreast of the 
latest developments in the discipline. 

5. To develop an understanding of the workings of various political 
systems (western and non-western) and interaction among them. 

6. To develop a sense of relevance in political science to other social 
sciences. 

7. To develop a sense of tolerance for minority views, divergent views 
and unpopular beliefs. 



176 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

8. To develop a frame of reference for continued investigation and re- 
search in political science. 

9. To encourage students to engage in constructive criticism of the 
political and social problems. 

10. To impart such basic knowledge of political science as would en- 
courage students to seek careers in the various aspects of national 
and international organizations. 

11. To promote self -enrichment. 

12. To prepare students for advanced study. 

MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

History (see below) 3 3 

Physical Science 100 — 4 

Biological Science 100 4 — 

Education 100 1 — 

Physical Education (men) 101, 103 1 1 

Physical Education (women) 102, 104 

^English 102 — 1 

**Elective 3 3 

19 19 

The following History courses may be elected by Freshmen students to 
satisfy the core requirements: 100, 101, 105, 107, 109 204, and 205. 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

French 100, 101 or 
German 102, 103 or 

Spanish 320, 321 3 3 

Speech 250 2 — 

Health Education 200 — 2 

Elective History 3 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Political Science 230 3 — 

Psychology 320 — 3 

Electives 3 3 

17 17 



*For those Freshmen who failed the Reading Test. 
**The Freshman-Sophomore elective considers the possible choice of Air Science or Military 
Science. 



Division of Social Sciences 



177 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Political Science 330, 440 3 

Political Science 441 3 

Elective Political Science 3 

Economics 301 3 

Philosophy 260 — 

Elective 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 

3 

3 
3 



15 



12 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Political Science 540, 541 3 

Political Science 543 3 

History 500 3 

Economics 305 3 

Electives 6 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



12 



COURSES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Undergraduate 

230. Introduction to Political Science. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2829) 
This course treats the terminology and concepts of political science in- 
cluding such themes as politics and functions of governments, political 
behavior, constitutional systems, local government and federalism, individual 
rights of man, political representation, and governmental agencies and 
processes. A prerequisite to all other political science courses for political 
science majors. 



330. Federal Government. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2941) 
A general introductory course in the government of the United States 
designed to acquaint the student with the basic facts and principles of the 
organization and operation of Federal institutions, and to give a foundation 
for more advanced work in Political Science. Prerequisites: Pol. Sc. 230 and 
History 205. 



331. 



Credit 3(3-0) 



The Struggle for Political Equality. 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2914) 
A comprehensive study of the Black man and minority groups in the 
United States to achieve political equality and equal justice before the law. 
It is structured around three main areas: (1) the political assumptions, 
idealogies and thought patterns of the architects of civil rights legislation; 
(2) the politics of protest — black political activity and allied group pres- 
sure attempts to secure equal rights. Such movements considered: the 



178 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Abolitionist Movement, the Marcus Garvey Movement, Black Church pro- 
test, the NACCP, CORE, SNCC, SCLC and the more militant protests; 
and (3) Government and minority groups— special emphasis will be placed 
here on judicial interpretation as it has affected minorities on the national, 
state and local level. 

333. Introduction to Political Research. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2815) 
For seniors — introduces students to fundamental methods and procedures 
in the collecting and analyzing of political data. Research on a specific 
political subject is required. 

440. Political Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2940) 

An in-depth treatment of the growth and development of this area of 
Political Science and its relevance to the field. The approach considers 
ancient and medieval thought as a unit and modern political thought as a 
separate unit. 

441. State Government. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2942) 

A study of the structure and functions of state government in the United 
States and its relation to federal and local governments. Special con- 
sideration is given to contemporary problems. Prerequisite: Pol. Sc. 230. 

442. Municipal Government. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2943) 

A study of municipal government in the larger context of local govern- 
ment as a whole. Treated will be form and structure, trends, economic de- 
velopments, governments and politics, the power structure, trends, economic 
developments, governments and politics, the power structure, the role of 
the citizen. A two-hour laboratory period is designed to import practical 
experience for the student. Open to juniors and seniors only. 

443. Public Administration. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2944) 

Emphasis is devoted to basic principles of organization, location of 
authority, fiscal management, personnel management, forms of administra- 
tive action in the public service, technological and managerial advance- 
ments. Prerequisites: Pol. Sc. 230, 330. 

444. International Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2945) 

A comprehensive treatment of the policies and politics of nations: im- 
perialism, colonialism, balance of power, international morality, treaties, 
sovereignty, diplomacy, tariff, war and other arrangements. Prerequisite: 
Pol. Sc. 330. 

445. Problems of Contemporary Africa. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2815) 

Consideration of liberation struggles, decolonization and the emerging 
of independent states, and efforts toward Pan-Africanism since World 
War II. 

446. Politics of the Black African Revolution. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2912) 

A survey of the development of resistance to white colonialism, neo- 
colonialism, and general international relations. 



Division of Social Sciences 179 

447. Contemporary American Political Thought. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2917) 
A study of contemporary American political theories and ideas ranging 
from William Buckley to Herbert Marcuse and Stokely Carmichael to 
Martin Luther King emphasis will be placed on the understanding, study- 
ing, evaluating, and criticizing of these theories provide a realistic and 
meaningful alternative to our present government. Prerequisite: Federal 
Government, State and Local Government, a good understanding of existing 
forces in contemporary American politics, and consent of instructor. 

505. Honors Seminar in Political Science. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2816) 
For superior students (seniors). A thorough examination of selected 
political works, primarily paperbacks. A treatment of selected political 
philosophies and ideas for informal discussion. Several critical reviews will 
be required. 

540. American Foreign Policy. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2964) 

An analysis of principles and problems of American Foreign Policy from 
1789 to the present. Prerequisite: Pol. Sc. 330. 

541. Party Politics and Pressure Groups. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2965) 

This course deals with modern political parties in the United States as 
instruments of popular government. Special emphasis is placed upon party 
structure, functions and operations as it relates to the Negro. Prerequisite: 
Pol. Sc. 230. 

542. American Constitutional Law. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2966) 

A case study of major Supreme Court Decisions, the Judiciary, the 
Congress, the President, the Federal System, the First Amendment 
Freedoms and Due Process Rights. 

543. International Law. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2967) 

A study of the major principles and practices in the development of the 
Law of Nations, utilizing significant cases for purposes of clarification. 
Prerequisites: Pol. Sc. 230, 444. 

544. International Organization. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2968) 

This course analyzes the role of the international organization in world 
politics. Particular emphasis is given to the various approaches of inter- 
national organizations in fostering peace and economic and social coopera- 
tion. Some attention will be given to the United Nations system as well as 
such defense, political, and economic arrangements as NATO, OSA, SEATO 
and the European Communities. Prerequisites: Pol. Sc. 230, 541, 543. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

640. Federal Government. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2976) 
After a brief review of the structure and functions of the federal govern- 
ment, this course concerns itself with special areas of federal government: 



180 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

problems of national defense, the government as a promoter, the govern- 
ment as regulator, etc. Students will engage in in-depth study in one of 
the specific areas under consideration. 

641. State Government. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2977) 

An in-depth study of special problems connected with operations of state 
and local governments. 

642. Modern Political Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5973) 

Includes selected political works for adherence to modern conceptions 
of the state, political institutions as well as the works of Machiavelli, 
Hobbes, Spinoza, Rousseau, Burke, Mill, Hegel, Marx, and Dewey. 

643. Urban Politics and Government. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5975) 

A detailed analysis of the urban political arena including political 
machinery, economic forces and political structures of local governmental 
units. 

645. American Foreign Policy — 1945 to Present. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2976) 

Examination of forces and policies that have emerged from Potsdam, 
Yalta, and World War II. Emphasis will be on understanding the policies 
that were formulated, how they were formulated, why they were formu- 
lated, the consequences of their formulation, and the alternative policies 
that may have come about. Prerequisites: Survey course in American 
history, American Diplomatic History, and consent of instructor. Enroll- 
ment limit of 15 students. 

646. The Politics of Developing Nations. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5974) 

Political structures and administrative practices of selected countries in 
Africa, Latin America, Asia. Analysis of particular cultural, social, and 
economic variables peculiar to the nations. 

Courses for Graduates Only 

For descriptions see Bulletin of the Graduate School. 

730. Constitutional Development Since 1865. 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2896) 

740. Government Finance. 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2898) 

741. Comparative Government. 
(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2899) 

742. Research and Current Problems. 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 2980) 

743. Readings in Political Science. 

(Formerly Pol. Sc. 5985) 



Division of Social Sciences 181 



PRE-LAW STUDENTS 



Students often ask, what course of study is best if one desires to enter 
law school upon graduation. The University of Denver Bulletin, College of 
Law, makes the following comment: 

"In the College of Law, as in most law schools, there is no course of 
study prescribed to precede admission to the study of law. A desirable 
prelegal course is one which prepares the student to think analytically, to 
reason logically, to concentrate effectively, to study purposefully and to 
express himself clearly in writing and speaking. In general, the prelaw 
student should acquire a broad liberal education. So far as possible, choice 
of courses should be made in accordance with the individual student's 
interests and needs. However, the student is strongly urged to obtain a 
broad background in the English language, including reading, writing and 
speaking." 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL SERVICE 

Will B. Scott, Chairman 

The Department of Sociology and Social Service offers curricula leading 
to the following: 

1. a B.S. degree in Sociology 

2. a B.S. degree in Social Service 

3. a minor in Sociology 

4. a minor in Social Service 

It is assumed that students who select a major in Sociology do so with 
the understanding that the program's emphasis is on preparation for 
graduate study in Sociology. 

The program in Social Service is designed to prepare students for pro- 
fessional careers in social service settings, including immediate employment, 
and preparation for graduate study 

SOCIOLOGY 

The B.S. degree curriculum in sociology is intended to prepare students 
for graduate study in sociology and to encourage graduates to select 
careers in college teaching and/or research. It is not designed to prepare 
students for immediate employment in direct service giving occupations. 
Beginning in September 1971, sociology majors should select cognate areas 
in The School of Arts and Sciences; or obtain special written permission 
from the chairman for the selection of cognate areas in other Schools. A 
cognate area consists of twelve (12) credits. With its emphasis on prepara- 
tion for graduate study, sociology majors must achieve and maintain a level 
of competency appropriate for graduate school admission. It should be noted 
that there are no employment opportunities as sociologists for holders of 
bachelor degrees in Sociology. 

A minor, consisting of 13-16 core courses in Sociology, is available and 
open to all students in the University. 



182 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Suggested Major in Sociology* 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 111, 113 4 

Biology or Zoology 4 

History (100 level course) 3 

Sociology 100 — 

Physical Education or Health Education — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
4 
4 

3 

2 



15 



17 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English (electives) 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Sociology 302, 304 3 

Political Science or Philosophy 3 

Foreign Language 3 

History (100 level course) — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Speech — 

Sociology 303 3 

Sociology 402, 403 4 

Foreign Language 3 

Cognate area 3 

Sociology electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 



17 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mathematics 240 3 

Sociology 671 3 

Cognate area 6 

Sociology electives 2 

Free electives — 

14 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



13 
13 



*For actual requirements see departmental handout. 



Division of Social Sciences 



183 



SOCIAL SERVICE 

The B.S. degree curriculum in Social Service is designed to prepare 
students for professional careers in social services, including preparation 
for immediate employment and preparation for graduate study. The 
curriculum utilizes class and field instruction to develop and strengthen 
the attitudes, values, and knowledge essential for alleviating problems that 
impair the social functioning of individuals, groups, and communities. 

In addition to the formal requirements of the program in Social Service, 
students are expected to demonstrate their interest and concern in social 
matters via active voluntary participation in on-campus and off-campus 
activities, groups, agencies, and organizations related to human social 
services. 

Suggested Major in Social Service* 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 3 

Biology or Zoology 4 4 

History (100 level course) 3 3 

Health Education or Physical Education 2 — 

Sociology 100 — 3 



16 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Economics — 

English (electives) 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Speech 2 

Sociology 302, 304 3 

Sociology 204 3 

Typing 2 

Social Service 333 — 

Mathematics 111 — 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 
Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

**Social Service 307 5 

**Social Service 306 3 

**Social Service 334 3 

Sociology 402, 403 3 

Language 3 

Political Science — 

Economics — 



16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



♦For actual requirements see departmental handout. 
** Requirements for Social Service majors must be taken concurrently. 



15 



184 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Social Service elective 5 — 

American History 3 3 

English elective 2 — 

Sociology 671 or Mathematics 240 3 — 

Free electives — 11 

13 14 

COURSES IN SOCIOLOGY 

100. Principles of Sociology. Credit 3 

(Formerly 203) 
Basic concepts and principles in sociology as they are used to examine 
patterned and recurrent forms of social behavior. 

200. Introduction to Anthropology. Credit 3 

An analysis and comparison of primitive cultures; further comparisons 
with modern cultures. 

202. Sophomore Honors Seminar in Social Institutions. Credit 3 

(Formerly 300) 
An examination of social institutions as major components of culture. 
Prerequisite: "B" average; restricted to sophomores. (May be used in place 
of Sociology 204.) 

204. Social Problems. Credit 3 

Major social problems in American society and their relationship to social 
structure. Prerequisite: Sociology 100, concurrent — Statistics. 

301. Origins of Social Thought. Credit 3 
(Formerly 401) 

The nature of social thought from the Greeks to the 19th century. 

302. Sociological Statistics I. Credit 3 
An introduction to elementary statistical reasoning. Prerequisite or con- 
current: Sociology 100 or 204. 

303. Sociological Statistics II. Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Elementary Statistics. 

304. Courtship and Marriage. Credit 2 
American premarital behavior patterns; emphasis on heterosexual re- 
lationships and preparation for marriage. 

305. Reading for Honors in Sociology. Credit 3 
Intensive and extensive library research on topics in sociology. Pre- 
requisite: "B" average. 

308. The Family. Credit 3 

(Formerly 407) 
The family as a social institution, and family types in cross cultural 
perspective. Prerequisite: Sociology 204. 



Division of Social Sciences 185 

313. The Community. Credit 3 

A study of the social boundaries commonly denned as communities and 
analysis of the social processes that occur within these boundaries. 

402. Sociological Theory. Credit 3 
Social thought and theory in its development from Comte to the present. 

Prerequisite: Sociology 204, Statistics. 

403. Research Methods in Sociology. Credit 3 
Techniques used in sociological research. Prerequisite or concurrent: 

Sociology 402. 

405. The Sociology of Work and Occupations. Credit 3 
(Formerly 500) 

An analysis of work and occupational roles within bureaucratic societies. 
Forms of management — employee relations are studied. 

406. Criminology. Credit 3 
Genesis and origin of crime; comparative analysis of theories of criminal 

behavior and the prevention of crime. Prerequisite: 9 hours of Sociology. 

408. Independent Study I. Credit 3 

Independent research on a specific topic or a delineated area in sociology. 
Prerequisite: Statistics, permission of instructor. (May be used in place 
of Sociology 403.) 

501. Social Stratification. Credit 3 

A study of social inequalities and differentiation as related to social 
structures and social systems. Prerequisite: Statistics. 

505. Seminar in Urban Studies. Credit 3 

(Formerly 600) 
An analysis of the nature and problems of cities, urban society and urban 
development. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

COURSES IN SOCIAL SERVICE 

306. Social Functioning and Human Development. Credit 3 
(Formerly 421) 

Selected aspects of social responses to growth, health, disease and dis- 
ability. (Majors and minors only.) Prerequisite: 333; concurrent: Social 
Service 307 or 320. 

307. Field Instruction I. Credit 5 
(Formerly 424) 

Supervised learning experiences in selected social agencies and settings. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; concurrent: Social Service 334. 

318. Practicum in Community Organization. Credit 3 

Selection of a community problem. Study and analysis of the problem 
followed by corrective activities, when possible. 

320. Reading for Honors in Social Welfare. Credit 3 

Extensive library research in selected areas of social welfare. Prerequi- 
site: Sophomore standing, "B" average. 

325. Honors Seminar in Social Service. Credit 3 

Selected topics in social welfare are extensively studied and discussed. 
(Majors and minors only.) Prerequisite: "B" average, Junior standing. 



186 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

333. Social Welfare I. Credit 3 
(Formerly 420) 

Emergence and development of welfare services in America. Social 
Welfare as a social institution. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

334. Basic Social Work Methods. Credit 3 
Basic methods in the provision of social services. Prerequisite: Social 

Service 320 or 333; concurrent: Field Instruction I. 

425. Field Instruction II. Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor; concurrent: 334. 

520. Field Instruction III. Credit 5 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor, 307 or 425; concurrent: 334. 

525. Independent Study. Credit 3 

(Formerly 620) 
Independent research in a delineated area of social welfare. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor, Field Instruction. 

571. Advanced Social Work Methods. Credit 2 

In depth discussion and utilization of selected social work methodology. 
Prerequisite: Basic Methods in Social Work, or equivalent. Concurrent: 
enrollment in Field Instruction. 

INTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

(These courses offer credit in either Sociology, or Social Service) 

314. The Black Experience. Credit 2 

A topical seminar focusing on commonly shared experiences of American 
Blacks in selected social institutions. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

370. Ageing in Society. Credit 3 

Ageing and its implications in social institutions. Prerequisite or con- 
current: Social Service 421. 

515. Independent Study II. Credit 3 

(Formerly 601) 
Prerequisite: Sociology 403. 

570. Senior Seminar. Credit 1 

Research and discussion of professional, and field issues related to careers 
in Sociology and in Social Service. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

669. Small Groups. Credit 3 
Elements and characteristics of small group behavior and process. Pre- 
requisite: Senior or graduate standing; permission of instructor. 

670. Law and Society. Credit 2 
This course examines selected and representative forms of social justice 

and injustices; barriers and opportunities for legal redress, as related to 
contemporary issues. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 

671. Advanced Research Methods. Credit 3 
Continuation of Sociology 403. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing; 

minimum of 6-9 credits in statistics and /or research. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 




SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

S. Joseph Shaw, Dean 

The School of Education provides opportunities for students to prepare 
for teaching careers in the secondary schools of the state and for other 
professional careers in industry and government. The programs of study 
are planned to allow the students to attain competence in both specialized 
and general areas of Education. 

The School of Education includes the following departments: Education, 
Psychology and Guidance, and Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 
In addition to these departments the School includes the Division of In- 
dustrial Education and Technology, the Department of Adult Education and 
Community Services and the Reading Center. 

All professional teacher education programs are administered and super- 
vised by the School of Education. The Schools of Education and Graduate 
Studies cooperate with the graduate teacher education programs. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of one of the undergraduate programs 
offered by the School of Education in cooperation with other departments 
of the University, the student is eligible to receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science with a major in one of the following areas: Agricultural Educa- 
tion, Art Education, Biology Education, Business Education, Chemistry 
Education, English Education, French, History, Home Economics Education, 
Industrial Arts, Industrial Education, Mathematics Education, Music Edu- 
cation, Physical Education, Physics Education, Social Studies, Psychology, 
Recreation, and Library Science. 

TEACHER EDUCATION 

The program of teacher education seeks to improve the quality of educa- 
tion available to the youth of North Carolina through improved prepara- 
tion of teachers and other school personnel including administrators, 
guidance counselors and supervisors. To that end, it offers both under- 
graduate and graduate programs of professional study which represent a 
continuum with similar objectives. The program seeks, therefore, to attain 
these goals: 

(1) Prepare young people to take their places as competent members of 
the profession of education; and 

(2) Provide opportunities for advanced study for school personnel already 
established in education. 

The office of the Registrar in collaboration with the office of the Director 
of Teacher Education is the central agency vested with the authority and 
responsibility to certify to the State Department of Public Instruction 
students who are to be recommended by the Institution for certification in 
the following fields: 

1. Agricultural Education 10. Home Economics Education 

2. Art 11. Industrial Education 

3. Biology 12. Mathematics 

4. Early Childhood Education 13. Music 

5. Business Education 14. Physical Education 

6. Chemistry 15. Physics 

7. English 16. Social Sciences 
Foreign Languages 17. Vocational Industrial Education 



9. History 



189 



190 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

In recognition of this function, the approval or endorsement of the depart- 
ment providing courses in the subject matter areas in which the candidate 
is to be certified must be secured prior to the approval or endorsement of 
the Director. The University reserves the right to refuse to recommend any 
applicants for certificates when they are deficient in mental or physical 
health, scholarship, character, or other qualifications deemed necessary for 
success in the profession of education. 

The program in teacher education is divided into three separate but inter- 
related phases: (1) general education; (2) subject-matter or certification 
specialization; and (3) professional education. 

General Education 

The general education phase of the Teacher Education Program functions 
to provide experience and learning which meet the fundamental needs of 
all teachers, both in the role of teacher and citizen in a democracy. General 
education provides for the student the understandings, the knowledge, the 
appreciation, and the sensitivity attainable through the study of a broad 
range of materials and concepts ranging across the humanities, the arts, 
the social sciences, the natural sciences and mathematics. It provides a 
broad understanding of the cultural heritage and of the physical and social 
environments. 

General education constitutes 40 percent of the four-year Teacher Edu- 
cation Program. It is recommended that the student complete the general 
education requirements by the end of the sophomore year. 

The specific purposes of the program in general education are to: 

1. Develop competency in the ability to read, write and speak the English 
language clearly and effectively. 

2. Develop an understanding of the development of world civilization and 
understandings of the basic concepts of the social studies, and an 
understanding of democracy as a way of life. 

3. Develop a critical understanding of and a sensitivity to the aesthetic, 
philosophical, ethical, and imaginative values expressed in literature, 
art, music, religion and philosophy. 

4. Develop an appreciation and understanding of the structure of science, 
of scientific inquiry, and of the main scientific principles. 

5. Develop an appreciation and understanding of the structure and ap- 
plications of mathematics. 

6. Develop the knowledge, habits, and attitudes necessary to achieve and 
maintain sound physical and mental health. 

Transfers to the Teacher Education Program 

Transfer policies refer to the student who starts his college program in an 
academic area (such as mathematics or chemistry) and decides to become 
a teacher late in his college career. The following requirements are neces- 
sary for admittance to the Teacher Education Program under these con- 
ditions: 

1. The student must have satisfied the general education requirements. 

2. The student must have a 2.00 grade point average in his academic 
work and the general education program. 



School of Education 191 

3. The student must apply formally to be admitted to the Teacher Educa- 
tion Program. Application will be made to the Chairman of the Depart- 
ment in which he plans to major. 

4. The student must meet the same criteria as are recommended for 
other students in Suggested Policies Governing Admission to the 
Teacher Education Program. 

5. The Chairman of the Academic Department has the responsibility of 
enrolling the student in the Teacher Education Program after the 
student has met all requirements. 

Certification 

When the student completes the Teacher Education sequence, he must 
apply for state certification by (1) requesting a certification application 
form from the Registrar's office and (2) requesting a copy of his official 
transcript to be attached to the application and submitted to the Division of 
Certification. 

The student must take the National Teacher Examination, both the 
Common and the Teaching Area Examinations, and he must have these 
scores on file in the Teacher Education Office. 

Teacher Education Admission and Retention Standards 

Admission 

To be admitted to the Teacher Education Program a student should file 
an application with the chairman of the academic department in which he 
plans to major during his sophomore year. The student must have an overall 
grade point average of 2.00 and a major field average of 2.00 before he can 
be admitted to the Program. 

Prior to his fourth semester in residence each applicant must satisfy the 
following requirements : 

1. Successfully complete Mathematics 101 and 102 or 111. 

2. Successfully complete English 100, 101, and 250 with a grade of "C" 
or better in each course. 

3. Take a personality inventory test. 

4. Show evidence of good health. A statement from a physician is neces- 
sary. The health of a prospective teacher should not restrict his ability 
as a teacher. The details regarding what constitutes health not good 
enough for a teacher will be determined in consultation with the 
Student Health Director. 

5. Demonstrate his ability to use the English language effectively. 

During the fourth semester of a student's residence, his complete profile 
will be examined by the Teacher Education Council. At this time, the 
student must have a minimum cumulative average of 2.00 before the Teacher 
Education Council will entertain his application for Teacher Education. 



192 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Retention 

To remain in the Teacher Education Program, the student must: 

Maintain an academic average of 2.00 in the areas in which he seeks 
certification and in professional education. In addition, a student must 
repeat any required major field course or professional education course, 
except Psychology 320 or Education 300, when he earns a grade of 
"D". The repetition will not be considered in the hours required for 
graduation but the hours and the grade for the repetition will be 
included in the determination of the overall grade point average. 

a. Should a student's academic average fall below 2.00 in either the 
area he seeks certification or the area of professional education, 
he will be placed on probation or dropped from the Teacher Educa- 
tion Programs, depending on the level to which his academic marks 
fall. 

b. Once a student has been dropped from the Teacher Education Pro- 
gram because of poor scholarship, he may reapply with the Director 
of Teacher Education providing his academic average has returned 
to 2.00 in the area he seeks certification and /or in the area of pro- 
fessional education. 

Readmission to Teacher Education Program 

Once a student has been dropped from the Teacher Education Program 
for any reason, the following steps must be taken before a student will be 
readmitted to the Teacher Education Program: 

1. The student must file a formal application for readmittance to the 
Teacher Education Program with the Director of Teacher Education. 

2. The Director of Teacher Education must bring the application of the 
student along with the student's complete profile before the Teacher 
Education Council for action. 

3. The Director of Teacher Education will formally notify, in writing, 
the student, Department Chairman, Dean of the School involved and 
the Dean of Academic Affairs of the action of the Teacher Education 
Council with reference to the student's application for readmission to 
the Teacher Education Program. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Dorothy M. Prince, Chairman 

The Department of Education collaborates with the various academic de- 
partments of the University for the education of secondary school teachers 
and with the Department of Home Economics for the preparation of 
teachers for grades kindergarten through three. The Department also offers 
two programs in library science: (1) the teacher-librarian program and 
(2) the school librarian program. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

The professional education phase of the program in teacher education is 
designed to discover the prospective teacher of promise and to develop the 
competencies necessary for beginning teachers at the secondary level. 



School of Education 193 

Approximately eighteen percent of the undergraduate curriculum is 
devoted to professional education. This phase is designed to achieve the 
following objectives: 

1. To develop understanding of human growth and development with 
special emphasis on the adolescent years. 

2. To develop understanding of the nature of learning, how it takes place, 
and some factors which may enhance or inhibit its progress. 

3. To develop understanding of materials and methods as they relate to 
learning in the student's area of specialization. 

4. To develop skills necessary for wise use of materials, methods and 
resources applicable to instruction in the student's area of specializa- 
tion. 

5. To develop understanding of the purposes, organization, and admin- 
istration of the school system, with special emphasis on the role of 
the school system, with special emphasis on the role of the secondary 
teacher in the total program. 

6. To develop understanding of the social, historical and philosophical 
foundations undergirding the American pattern of education. 

7. To develop a knowledge of the total instructional process through 
direct observation and participation in teaching under strict super- 
vision. 

8. To develop the skills necessary for the manipulation of materials and 
methods and the guidance of the learning process through direct ob- 
servation and practice of teaching under strict and constructive super- 
vision. 

Suggested Professional Education Sequence 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Spring 

Ed. 300 2 Ed. 301 2 

Psy. 320 3 — 



Junior Year 

Fall Spring 

Ed. 400 3 Psy. 436 3 

3 3 

Senior Year 

Fall Spring 

'Ed. 500 3 *Ed. 500 3 

*Ed. 535, 536 3 *Ed. 535, 536 3 

*Ed. 560 6 *Ed. 560 6 

12 12 



♦Professional Block — Students except those taking library science courses are restricted to 
12 semester hours during- the student teaching semester. 



194 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Suggested Sequence for Library Science Education 

Library science education at the University is designed to qualify under- 
graduate students for North Carolina certification as teacher-librarians or 
school librarians at the elementary or secondary school level. The profes- 
sional education program for the prospective teacher-librarian and the 
school-librarian is the program followed for the major teaching area. 
Student teaching includes full-time continuous laboratory experience in a 
school library. As a second area of preparation, the teacher-librarian pro- 
gram includes a minimum of 12 semester hours in library science courses 
and the school-librarian program requires a minimum of 18 semester hours. 

Suggested Sequence for the Teacher-Librarian Program 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Spring 

Ed. 410 3 



Junior Year 

Ed. 412 3 Ed. 413 3 

3 3 

Senior Year 

Ed. 650 or 651 3 

Ed. 652 3 

3 

Suggested Sequence for the School-Librarian Program 

Ed. 410 3 

3 
Sophomore Year 

Ed. 412 3 Ed. 411 3 

~3 3 

Junior Year 

Ed. 650 or 651 3 Ed. 413 3 

3 

Senior Year 

Ed. 652 3 Ed. 415 3 

~6 3 



School of Education 195 

Certification 

When the student completes the Teacher Education sequence, he must 
apply for state certification by (1) requesting a certification application 
from the Registrar's office and (2) requesting a copy of his official transcript 
to be attached to the application. 

The student must take the National Teacher Examination, both the Com- 
mon and Teaching Area Examinations, and he must have these scores on 
file in the Teacher Education Office. The student must have the minimum 
scores required by the State of North Carolina before he will be recom- 
mended by the University for a North Carolina teaching certificate. 

COURSES IN EDUCATION 

100. Orientation. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly Education 2100) 
A familiarization with methods of improving study, taking notes and 
using the library. Offered each semester of the Freshman year and during 
the Summer Session. 

300. Introduction to Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Education 2120) 

An overview of the historical background of the systems of education in 
the United States, their aims, organization and procedures, and of the 
principles and practices on all levels of the American educational system; 
emphasis on the requirements of North Carolina. 

301. Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education. 

(Formerly Education 2121) Credit 2(2-0) 

A view of the educative process and its philosophical foundations; em- 
phasis on the philosophical implications of education as they relate to the 
pupil, curriculum, teacher, and the institution. 

302. Field Experiences and Community Services. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly Education 2123) 

Practical experiences and extensive contact with children and youth in 
the home, school, and community in multi-ethnic settings through roles as 
tutors, teacher aides, recreation assistants, and programmers. Emphasis 
upon the acquisition of social and cultural leadership roles and relevant 
educational growth and development. 

303. Socio-Philosophical Aspects of Education. Credit 4(4-0) 
An examination of past and contemporary factors in American Education 

through philosophical and sociological perspectives. Exploration of problems 
and possibilities inherent in relating theory and practice in education. 

400. Psychological Foundations of Education — Growth 

and Development. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Education 2154 — Restricted to Teacher Education Students) 
Psychological principles governing the interests and needs of preadoles- 
cence and adolescence; emphasis is placed on general principles of growth 
and development; physical, motor, intellectual, social, emotional and moral 
aspects. Observing, recording and interpreting human behavior including 
functional conceptions of learning will be provided in laboratory settings. 
Prerequisites: Psychology 320, Education 300, 301. 



196 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

402. Utilization of Audiovisual Media. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly Education 2122) 
A consideration of the improvement of instruction and communications 
through the use of audio-visual media; includes the study of the general 
practices, and utilization, selection, production, and evaluation of audio- 
visual media for teaching-learning or other informal education situations. 

410. Organization and Administration of School Media Centers. 

(Formerly Education 2110) Credit 3(3-0) 

The administrative organizational procedures including acquisition policies, 
program planning, and management of school media centers. 

411. Cataloging and Classification. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2111) 

Basic course in techniques of book description, their organization for 
services in libraries through decimal classification and their subject repre- 
sentation in the public catalog. 

412. School Library Reference Materials. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2112) 

The selection, evaluation and use of basic reference materials with em- 
phasis on the selection of materials, study of contents, and methods of 
location. 

413. Non-Book Materials. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2113) 

A study of principles and techniques for the selection, acquisition and use 
of non-book materials. Prerequisites: Education 410 and 411. 

414. Reading Interest. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2114) 

Materials correlative to recreational and curricula reading. Special atten- 
tion is given to the principles of selection based on reading interests and 
needs. 

415. Principles and Techniques of Librarianship. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2115) 

A study of the relationship of libraries to other social and educational 
agencies, standards for Library Service, and librarianship as a profession. 
Practical experience is required. Prerequisites: Education 410 and 411. 

500. Principles and Curricula of Secondary Schools. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2140) 

The history, nature, and function of the secondary school and its relation- 
ship to the elementary school and adult life. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours 
in education and psychology. 

501. Methods of Research and Evaluation in Health and 

Physical Education. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2160) 

The use of various research methods as applied to health education and 

physical education and the study of methods of evaluating biological, social 

and physiological outcomes for health education and physical education. 

Elementary statistical procedures are utilized. Prerequisite: Psychology 436. 



School of Education 197 

510. Teaching Language Arts in the Intermediate Grades. Credit 2(2-0) 
Methods, content, resources, and materials for teaching speaking, listen- 
ing, writing and spelling in grades 4-9. 

511. Teaching Reading in the Intermediate Grades. Credit 2(2-0) 
Basic course in the methods, materials, and techniques used in reading 

instruction from the primary area through the study skills techniques of 
high school. An examination of learning and the teaching of reading in 
light of curriculum adjustment and procedures for developing expanding 
reading skills in grades 4-9. Prerequisite: Psychology 451. 

512. Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades. Credit 2(2-0) 
The instructional program in the social studies. Emphasis on current 

methods, organization, materials, and resources. 

513. Strategies in Teaching Science in the Intermediate 

Grades. Credit 2(2-0) 

The examination, design, and evaluation of experiences for teaching 
science in grades 4-9. 

514. Strategies in Mathematics Instruction for the 

Intermediate Grades. Credit 2(2-0) 

Methods, materials, resources and evaluation for teaching modern mathe- 
matics in grades 4-9. 

525. Methods of Teaching Art. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2149) 

A study of the aims, objectives, methods and techniques of art teaching 
in the modern schools. Special attention given to planning courses of 
material and correlation. Required of those wishing to qualify as art 
teachers. Prerequisites: 30 hours of Art and 15 hours of Education and 
Psychology. 

526. Methods of Teaching English. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2144) 

A study of materials and methods of teaching English in the high school. 
Required of those planning to teach English. Prerequisites: English 450, 
430, 24 additional hours of English courses above English 100 and 15 
semester hours in Education and Psychology. 

527. Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2148) 

A study of the problems and difficulties experienced in teaching foreign 
languages. Special attention given to the matter of classroom aids, equip- 
ment, etc. Required of those students planning to teach the subject. Pre- 
requisites: 27 hours of French and 15 semester hours of Education and 
Psychology. 

528. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2151) 

A study of the objectives, methods, and techniques necessary for teaching 
vocational homemaking on the secondary level. 

529. Methods of Teaching Mathematics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2147) 

An evaluation of subject matter, materials, methods and techniques and 
objectives in the teaching of mathematics in the junior and senior high 



198 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

school. Required of those planning to teach the subject. Prerequisites: 30 
hours of mathematics and 15 hours of Education and Psychology. 

530. Public School Music Methods. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly Education 2141) 

A comprehensive study of materials and methods in the teaching of public 
school music. 

531. Vocal Methods and Materials. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2142) 

The teaching of vocal music in the public schools: vocal literature for 
vocal combinations in the public schools. 

532. Band Methods. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2145) 

A study of school band organization and administration. (Fall) 

533. The Teaching of Physical Education. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly Education 2143) 

A study of materials, methods and practice in planning, organizing and 
conducting physical education class activities. Prerequisites: Phy. Ed. 446 
and an adequate number of other physical education courses. 

534. The Teaching of Health Education. Credit 2(2-1) 
(Formerly Physical Education 2163) 

Methods, materials and procedures for the teaching of health in the 
elementary and secondary schools. Prerequisites: Health Education 220 and 

442. 

535. Methods of Teaching Science. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2150) 

A study of methods, materials and techniques of teaching such subjects 
as Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and General Science in the high school. 
Required of all those planning to teach in this field. Prerequisites: 27 hours 
of Science and 15 semester hours of Education and Psychology. 

536. Methods of Teaching Social Sciences. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2146) 

A study of techniques of social science instruction on the high school 
level. Required of those planning to teach the subject. Prerequisites: 27 
hours of Social Studies and 15 semester hours of Education and Psychology. 

537. Driver Education and Traffic Safety. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Education 2153) Also Driver Ed. 253 

A consideration of the objectives and scope of driver education, traffic 
laws, preventive maintenance; skill developing exercises, and aids to teach- 
ing driver education. Designed to train students who may wish to teach 
driver education in the public schools. 

538. Driver Education and Teacher Training. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Education 2162) Also Driver Ed. 454 

The organization and administration of the high school driver education 
program. Special emphasis given to methods and resources; scheduling and 
evaluation. 



School of Education 199 

558. Observation and Directed Teaching. Credit 6(2-8) 
Observation and guided teaching experiences in the preschool laboratory 

and in grades kindergarten through three. 

559. Student Teaching and Seminar. Credit 6(2-8) 
Actual teaching experiences under supervision in grades 4-9; seminar 

before, during and after field experiences. Prerequisites: Education 300, 
303, 400, and Psychology 436, and Education 510-514. 

560. Observation and Student Teaching. Credit 6(2-8) 
(Formerly Education 2161) 

The application and practice of methods, techniques, and materials of 
instruction in a real classroom situation under supervision, includes purpose- 
ful observation; organization of teaching materials; participation in other 
activities which will aid in developing a teacher (guidance activities, child 
accounting, co-curricular activities, parent-teacher associations, teachers' 
meetings), and ninety or more clock hours of actual teaching. Prerequisites: 
Overall GPA of 2.00 in both the professional sequence and the academic 
sequencies major and minor areas of specialization; Ed. 500, Principles and 
Curricula of Secondary Schools and Ed. 525-536, Methods of Teaching . . . 
completed or taken concurrently. 

Before enrolling in this course, a student must repeat any required major 
field course or Education course, except Psych. 320 and Ed. 300, in which 
he receives a grade of D. The repetition will not be considered in the hours 
required for graduation but the hours and the grade of the repetition will 
be included in the determination of the overall grade point average. 

561. Seminar. Credit 1(1-0) 
A consideration of selected topics and current trends in the field of 

education. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

625. Theory of American Public Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2180) 

An examination of the philosophical resources, objectives, historical in- 
fluences, social organization, administration, support, and control of public 
education in the United States. 

626. History of American Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2184) 

A study of the historical development of education in the United States 
emphasizing educational concepts and practices as they relate to political, 
social, and cultural developments in the growth of a system of public educa- 
tion. 

627. The Afro- American Experience in American Education. 

(Formerly Education 2181) Credit 3(3-0) 

Lectures, discussions, and research in the Afro-American in American 
education including the struggle for literacy, contributions of Afro-Ameri- 
cans to theory, philosophy and practice of education in the public schools, 
private and higher education. Traces the development of school desegrega- 
tion, its problems, and plans. 



200 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

630. Foundations in Reading. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Education 2179) 
Basic reading- course; consideration of the broad field of reading — its 
goals and nature; factors affecting its growth; sequential development of 
skills, attitudes and interests, types of reading approaches, organization and 
materials in teaching the fundamentals of reading. 

636. Methods and Materials in Teaching Reading in the 

Elementary School. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Education 2171) 
The application of principles of learning and child development to the 
teaching of reading and the related language arts. Methods and approaches 
to the teaching of reading in the elementary school, including phonics, 
developmental measures, informal testing procedures, and the construction 
and utilization of instructional materials. 

637. Teaching Reading in the Secondary School. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2178) 

Nature of a developmental reading program initiating and organizing a 
high school reading program, the reading curriculum, including reading 
in the content subjects, critical reading, procedures and techniques, and 
corrective and remedial aspects. 

638. Classroom Diagnosis in Reading Instruction. Credit 3(3-0) 
Methods, techniques, and materials used in the diagnosis of reading 

problems in the kindergarten-primary area through the intermediate level. 
Attention upon the pupil and the interpretation of physiological, psycho- 
logical, sociological, and educational factors affecting learning to read. 
Opportunity for identification analysis interpretation on, and strategies for 
fulfilling the reading needs of all pupils. Prerequisite: Psychology 541. 

639. Reading Practicum. Credit 3(0-6) 
Application of methods, materials and professional practices relevant to 

teaching pupils. Provisions for participation in and teaching of reading. 
Designed to coordinate the student's background in reading, diagnosis, 
learning, and materials. Student teaching in a public school. Prerequisite: 
12 credit hours in reading. 

640. Teaching the Slower Learner in the Regular Classroom. 

(Formerly Education 2177) Credit 3(3-0) 

A study of materials and methods for adjusting instruction in arithmeetic, 

spelling, language, reading to the slower learning child in heterogeneous 

classes. Consideration given to discussion and study in the unit and activity 

program and the drill and skill program in relation to it. 

641. Teaching the Culturally Disadvantaged Learner. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2771) 

Psychological and sociological influences on culturally deprived learners 
and their development; emphasis on the experential lacks of the culturally 
deprived learner; and special teaching methods, materials and activities. 
A consideration of groups of American Indians, Negroes, Puerto Ricans, 
urban poor, rural poor, Mexican Americans, Mountain whites, and migrant 
workers who may be culturally deprived. 



School of Education 201 

642. Preparation of Audiovisual Materials. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Education 2176) 

The development and application of basic skills in the production of 
graphic and audio teaching- materials as media of communications. Preparing 
instructional materials as they relate to educational programs. 

643. Library Usage for Classroom Teachers. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Education 2175) 

A study of library-classroom coordination of the instructional program. 
Attention given to cooperative planning for the scope and sequence of 
library study skills and reading guidance programs. Stress placed on the 
use of appropriate library materials as a means of vitalizing teaching. 

650. Book Selection and Related Materials for Children. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2075) 

Children's literature with study of aids and criteria for selection of books 
and other materials for the Elementary School Pupils and investigation 
of children's reading interests. 

651. Book Selection and Related Materials for Young People. 

(Formerly Education 2076) Credit 3(3-0) 

The development and use of school libraries and the reading interests of 
young people and source of information regarding books. 

652. Foundations of Librarianship. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2078) 

Current trends in School Librarianship, administrative processes, prin- 
ciples of management and library cooperation. 

653. Building Library Collection. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2077) 

Criteria for evaluating and selecting library materials, devising and 
maintaining an acquisition program. 

660. Introduction to Exceptional Children. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2372) 

An overview of the educational needs of exceptional or "different" children 
in the regular classroom situation; emphasis placed on classroom techniques 
known to be most helpful to children having hearing losses, speech dis- 
orders, visual problems, emotional, social handicaps and intelligence devia- 
tion, including slow-learners and gifted children. An introduction to the 
area of special education. Designed for classroom teachers. 

661. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2373) 

An analysis of psychological factors affecting identification and develop- 
ment of mentally retarded children, physically handicapped children, and 
emotionally and socially maladjusted children. 

662. Mental Deficiency. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2376) 

A survey of types and characteristics of mental defectives; classification 
and diagnosis; criteria for institutional placement and social control of 
mental deficiency. Prerequisites: Special Education 660 and 661. 



202 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

663. Measurement and Evaluation in Special Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Education 2375) 

The selection, administration, and interpretation of individual tests; 
intensive study of problems in testing exceptional and extremely deviate 
children; consideration to measurement and evaluation of children that are 
mentally, physically, and emotionally or socially handicapped. Emphasis 
upon the selection and use of group tests of intelligence and the interpreta- 
tion of their results. 

664. Materials Methods, and Problems in Teaching 

Mentally Retarded Children. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly Education 2377) 
Basic organization of programs for the education of the mentally re- 
tarded: classification and testing of mental defectives; curriculum develop- 
ment and principles of teaching intellectually slow children. Attention is 
also given to the provision of opportunities for observing and working with 
children who have been classified as mentally retarded. Prerequisites: 
Special Education 660, 661, and 663. 

665. Practicum in Special Education. Credit 3(0-6) 
Observation, participation, and teaching in an educational program for 

the mentally retarded. 

670. Introduction to Adult Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Education 2172) 

The history, philosophy, and general organization and administrational 
problems of adult education. 

671. Methods in Adult Education. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Education 2173) 

Methods of informal instruction, group leadership, conference planning, 
and techniques in handling various issues of interest to adults. For persons 
preparing to conduct adult education programs as well as those preparing 
to serve as instructors or leaders in the public schools and/or in various 
agencies serving adults. Prerequisite: Education 671. 

683. Curriculum in Early Childhood. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Also Home Ec. 614) (Formerly Education 2080) 

Curriculum experiences and program planning appropriate to nursery and 
kindergarten education. 

684. Methods in Early Childhood. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Also Home Ec. 613) (Formerly Education 2079) 

Administration, principles, practices, methods, and resources in the organi- 
zation of preschool and primary programs. An interdisciplinary and team 
approach. Observation for teaching styles and strategies. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the Graduate School Bulletin. 

700. Introduction to Graduate Study. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2294) 

701. Philosophy of Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2185) 



School of Education 



203 



702. 
703. 
710. 
711. 
720. 
721. 
722. 
723. 
724. 
725. 
726. 
727. 

728. 

735. 
736. 
737. 

740. 
745. 
746. 
755. 



Readings in Modern Philosophy of Education. 

(Formerly 2092) 

Educational Sociology. 

(Formerly 2195) 

Methods and Techniques of Research. 

(Formerly 2189) 

Educational Statistics. 

(Formerly 2299) 



Curriculum Development. 

(Formerly 2085) 

Curriculum in the Elementary School. 

(Formerly 2296) 

Curriculum in the Secondary School. 

(Formerly 2187) 

Principles of Teaching. 

(Formerly 2295) 

Problems and Trends in Teaching Science. 

(Formerly 2193) 

Problems and Trends in Teaching Social Sciences. 

(Formerly 2192) 

Workshop in Methods of Teaching Language Arts. 

(Formerly 2291) 

Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern Mathematics 
for Junior and Senior High School Teachers. 

(Formerly 2087) 

Workshop in Methods of Teaching Modern Mathematics 
in Elementary Schools. 

(Formerly 2290) 

Utilization of Audiovisual Materials. 

(Formerly 2188) 

Workshop in Audiovisual Media. 

(Formerly 2191) 

Organization and Administration of Audiovisual 
Programs. 

(Formerly 2190) 

Problems in the Improvement of Reading. 

(Formerly 2094) 

Advanced Reference and Bibliography. 

(Formerly 2293) 

Principles and Problems in Cataloging and Classification. 

(Formerly 2298) 

Supervision of Instruction. 

(Formerly 2086) 



Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(2-2) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 2(2-0) 

Credit 3(3-0) 

Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 

Credit 3(1-4) 

Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 

Credit 3(3-0) 
Credit 3(3-0) 



204 


North Carolina A. and T. State University 




756. 


Supervision of Student Teachers. 

(Formerly 2285) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


757. 


Problems in Supervision of the Elementary School. 

(Formerly 2197) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


758. 


Problems in High School Supervision. 

(Formerly 2199) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


760. 


The Junior High School. 

(Formerly 2088) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


761. 


Administration of the Elementary School. 

(Formerly 2196) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


762. 


High School Administration. 

(Formerly 2198) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


763. 


Public School Administration. 

(Formerly 2091) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


764. 


Pupil Personnel Administration. 

(Formerly 2297) 


Credit 2(2-0) 


765. 


School Publicity and Public Relations. 

(Formerly 2194) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


766. 


School Planning. 

(Formerly 2186) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


767. 


Public School Finance. 

(Formerly 2095) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


768. 


Principles of School Law. 

(Formerly Education 2174) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


769. 


Problems in Educational Administration and 
Supervision. 

(Formerly 2089) 


Credit 3(0-6) 


775 


The Community College and Post Secondary Education. 

(Formerly 2393) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


776. 


Principles of College Teaching. 

(Formerly 2394) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


780. 


Comparative Education. 

(Formerly 2093) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


781. 


Issues in Elementary Education. 

(Formerly 2286) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


782. 


Issues in Secondary Education. 

(Formerly 2287) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


783. 


Current Research in Elementary Education. 

(Formerly 2288) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


784. 


Current Research in Secondary Education. 

(Formerly 2289) 


Credit 3(3-0) 


785. 


Independent Readings in Education I. 


Credit 1(0-2) 



(Formerly 2395) 



School of Education 205 

786. Independent Readings in Education II. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 2396) 

787. Independent Readings in Education III. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 2397) 

790. Seminar in Educational Problems. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 2392) 

791. Thesis Research. Credit 6(0-12) 
(Formerly 2292) 

792. Advanced Seminar and Internship in Educational 
Administration. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly 2090) 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND GUIDANCE 

James E. Hedgebeth, Acting Chairman 

The Department of Psychology and Guidance assumes four functions in 
the educational program of the University. First, through graduate courses 
in child growth and development, educational psychology, measurement and 
evaluation, and mental hygiene, the department attempts to provide for the 
needs of graduate education majors in the psychological foundations of 
education. Second, the department in collaboration with other departments 
of the University provides a sequence of guidance and psychology courses 
required for the graduate education major with a concentration in guidance. 
For a more detailed description of these two programs, see the Graduate 
School Bulletin. 

The third and fourth functions of the department involve the provision 
of sequences of courses designed to meet the needs of the undergraduate 
minor and undergraduate major in psychology, respectively. These two 
functions are described in some detail below following which course de- 
scriptions are presented. 

THE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN PSYCHOLOGY 

Both the undergraduate major and minor programs in psychology are 
primarily aimed at providing a broad general education rather than 
specialized professional training in psychology. If it can be assumed that 
this maximum development of the individual intellectually, emotionally, 
socially, and physically, then the unique contributions of the undergraduate 
psychology programs are at least two in number: (1) development of 
psychological knowledge of potential usefulness in solving problems of 
personal and social living; and (2) development of a better understanding 
of the problems of the arts and sciences by helping students more effectively 
approach these as problems of scientific inquiry. 

With respect to pre-professional training in psychology, both programs 
are designed to attempt to develop the following additional attributes in 
students who minor or major in the discipline. 

1. Knowledge of the many facts and, as yet, relatively few principles 
or laws of behavior which make up the subject-matter of psychology; 



206 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

2. Rigorous habits of thinking; 

3. Acceptace of knowledge of behavioral phenomena as a value in itself 
rather than knowledge acquired solely for immediate and practical 
ends; and, 

4. Acceptance of the probability nature of most psychological data and 
hence, the need for attitudes of caution and responsibility in the ac- 
ceptance of these data. 

It is assumed that these pre-professional objectives will be attained with 
minors in psychology and majors in psychology differentially and that 
these differences will represent matters of degree rather than kind. 

THE MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The major program is designed for the student whose occupational goal, 
following pre-professional undergraduate and professional graduate training 
is in the general field of psychology. Samples of specific positions for which 
these two levels of training prepare the individual are: college professor, 
experimental psychologist, social psychologist, public opinion analyst, test 
designer, clinical psychologist, research industrial psychologist, manage- 
ment consultant, school psychologist, rehabilitation worker, vocational 
counselor, and psychometrist. 

Students with majors in psychology must first satisfy general education 
graduate requirements prescribed by the School of Education with respect 
to English, foreign languages, health and physical education, humanities, 
and orientation. The mathematics' requirements for psychology majors in- 
clude Freshman Mathematics I and II or one course in College Algebra 
and one course in Analytic Geometry and Calculus; the science require- 
ments include one course in Biological Science, one course in Human 
Anatomy and Physiology, and one course in Physical Science; and the 
social sicence requirements include Western Civilization I and II and one 
course in Principles of Sociology. Psychology majors will preferably com- 
plete Elementary Psychology rather than the course in General Psychology 
which represents a School general education requirement for non-psychology 
majors. 

Requirements in the area of specialization, including Elementary Psy- 
chology, are completion of twelve (12) courses provided by the Department 
of Psychology and Guidance with a minimum cumulative grade point aver- 
age equaling or exceeding the overall minimum cumulative grade point 
average required by the University for graduation. Nine of the courses, 
including three courses of one academic year's duration, are prescribed. 
The additional courses are departmental electives and should be selected 
with the approval of the student's advisor from among those listed below the 
Suggested Course Sequence for the Major in Psychology. 

THE MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The minor program in psychology is designed for the student who desires 
training in the discipline beyond the level of an introductory course but 
whose occupational objectives are in fields other than psychology. These 
include law, medicine, education, social welfare, business administration, 
and the like. Such students will normally pursue those general education 
courses and major courses which are prescribed by the departments in 
which they are registered during the first two years of college work. 



School of Education 



207 



In addition, during their sophomore year, they will pursue Psychology 
320 — General Psychology and Psychology 322 — Statistical Methods (or an 
equivalent first course in statistics) the first semester, and Psychology 
323 — Social Psychology the second semester. During the junior and senior 
years, the psychology minor will pursue an additional fifteen semester 
hours in psychology selected from among other course offerings of the 
department, the only restriction being that the selection is limited to those 
courses whose prerequisites have been previously met. 



Suggested Course Sequence for the Major in Psychology 



Freshman Year 



Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Biological Science 100 4 

Education 100 1 

English 100, 101 4 

English 102* — 

History 100, 101 3 

Mathematics 101, 102 or 110, 111 3 

Physical Science 100 — 

Physical Education 101, 103 (Men) or 1 

Physical Education 102, 104 (Women) 1 

**Aerospace Studies 101 & 102; 103 & 104 or 1,0 

**Military Science 101, 102 1 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



4 
1 
3 
3 

4 
1 
1 

1,1 
1 



17 (Men) 
16 (Women) 



17-18 
16 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 250 2 

French 100, 101 or 300, 301 or 

German 102, 103 or Spanish 320, 321 3 

Health Education 200 2 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 321, 323 3 

Psychology 322 — 

Sociology 203 3 

Zoology 461 — 

**Aerospace Studies 201 & 202; 203 & 204 or 1 

**Military Science 201, 202 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17-18 (Men) 
16 (Women) 



17-18 
16 



♦Required of Freshmen failing- to achieve the critical score on a test or reading skills. 
"Optional courses. 



208 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Psychology 430, 431 3 3 

Psychology 432, 433 3 3 

Psychology 434 3 — 

Departmental Electives 3 6 

Free Electives 3 4 

15 16 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Psychology 439, 541 3 3 

Psychology 542, 543 3 3 

Free Electives 9 9 

15 15 

Departmental Electives Courses for the Major in Psychology 
(A minimum of three courses required) 

Psychology 435. Educational Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 

Psychology 436. Tests and Measurements. Credit 3(2-2) 

Psychology 438. Computer Programming. Credit 3(1-4) 

Psychology 444. Applied Psychology. Credit 3(2-2) 

Psychology 445. Industrial Psychology. Credit 3(2-2) 

Psychology 540. Physiological Psychology. Credit 3(2-2) 

Psychology 661. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Credit 3(3-0) 

Psychology 662. Mental Deficiency. Credit 3(3-0) 

COURSES IN GUIDANCE 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

600. Introduction to Guidance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2378) 
A foundation course for prospective teachers, part-time or full-time 
counselors who plan to do further work in the field of guidance or of 
education. Special consideration will be given to the nature, scope, and 
principles of guidance services. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For description of 
them, see the Graduate School Bulletin. 

705. Guidance Practicum. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 2385) 



School of Education 209 

706. Organization and Administration of Guidance Services. 

(Formerly 2386) Credit 2(2-0) 

707. Research Seminar. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 2387) 

715. Measurement for Guidance. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2395) 

716. Techniques of Individual Analysis. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2396) 

717. Educational and Occupational Information. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2397) 

718. Introduction to Counseling. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2398) 

719. Case Studies in Counseling. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2399) 

COURSES IN PSYCHOLOGY 

Undergraduate 

320. General Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2020) 

An introduction to psychology as a life science especially designed for 
the major in areas other than psychology. Topics given major consideration 
include maturation and development; motivation, emotion, and personality; 
mental health; intelligence and aptitudes; perception and attention; learn- 
ing, forgetting, language, and thinking; social influences, attitudes, and 
beliefs, and vocational adjustment. 

321. Elementary Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2021) 

An introduction to psychology as a behavioral science required of the 
major in psychology with enrollment restricted to such majors. Major 
areas of consideration include maturation and development; nervous system 
and internal environment; physiological basis of behavior; sensory pro- 
cesses and perception; learning, thinking and language; motivation, emotion, 
and personality; and, psychological testing. 

322. Statistical Methods. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2022) 

Analysis and interpretation of research data. Descriptive statistics 
(frequency distributions, centrality, variability and correlation of mea- 
sures), introduction to statistical inferences (normal curve sampling theory, 
chi-square tests of statistical hypotheses, t-tests, analysis of variance, 
Scheffe test ratio). 

323. Social Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2023) 

An introduction to the study of the behavior of the individual in relation 
to factors in his social environment. Socialization, enculturation, attitude 
formation and modification, social influence on perceptual and conceptual 
processes, and social interaction. 



210 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

430. Child Development. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2030) 

A comprehensive study of the physical, social, emotional, personality, 
language and intellectual development of the child from birth through 
early childhood. 

431. Adolescent Development. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2031) 

Continuation of Child Development with emphasis on the periods of 
middle childhood through adolescence. 

432. Experimental Psychology I. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2032) 

The first of a two-semester sequence in experimental psychology unifying 
subject matter (content) and methodology. Emphasis on application of ex- 
perimental methodology in the analysis of such behavioral phenomena as 
perceptual processes, motivation, frustration and conflict. 

433. Experimental Psychology II. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2033) 

Continuation of Experimental Psychology I. Emphasis on application cf 
experimental methodology in the analysis of such behavioral phenomena as 
simple and complex learning, transfer, retention, forgetting, perceptual- 
motor learning, verbal learning, and problem solving. 

434. Abnormal Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2034) 

Behavior deviations and psychological disorders occurring during the 
several developmental stages; basis concepts employed in psycho-pathology, 
mental hygiene, and psychiatry. 

435. Educational Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2035) 

A study of basic problems underlying the psychology of education; 
individual differences, development of personality, motivation of learning 
and development, nature of learning and procedures which best promote its 
efficiency. 

436. Tests and Measurements. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2036) 

A basic study of standardized and teacher-made measuring devices, ac- 
ceptable methods of selecting, administering, and interpreting all types of 
tests applicable to the school and classroom. 

437. Mental Hygiene. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2037) 

A study of basic principles of adjustment and mental hygiene. 

438. Computer Programming. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 2038) 

The theory of and practical experience in block diagramming, program- 
ming and computer operation. Programming with the P.L.I, language and 
processing via tele-typewriter remote console connected to an IBM 360. 
All students will be required to write, test, and run original as well as 
standard computer programs. 



School of Education 211 

439. Theories of Personality. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2039) 
Contemporary theoretical formulations of the structure and development 
of personality and their empirical bases. 

444. Applied Psychology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2044) 

The utilization of psychological principles in five areas of American 
culture; effectively training new generations; maintaining mental health; 
administering justice; promoting economic progress; the facilitating efficient 
production. 

445. Industrial Psychology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2045) 

A consideration of the significance of individual differences in industry; 
employee selection and training; reduction of monotony and fatigue and 
the promotion of efficiency; accident prevention; psychological factors in 
employee turnover. 

540. Physiological Psychology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2040) 

A study of the physiological and chemical processes (and their anatomical 
substrates) that intervene between the arrival of sensory impulses in the 
central nervous system and the elaboration of responses to them. 

541. Psychology of Learning. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2041) 

A general survey of those changes in performance as a function of 
practice subsumed under the label "learning" consideration is given to the 
basic controlling variables — individual responses; such interactions of 
learned responses as chaining and transfer of training; and processes 
under the control of implicit and mediating activity such as retention and 
problem solving. 

542. Seminar in Psychology I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2042) 

A study of selected major systematic views and theoretical issues in 
psychology. Each student participates in supervised research in psychologi- 
cal journals and other materials leading to an oral presentation and written 
paper on a substantive view or issue in psychology. 

543. Seminar in Psychology II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2043) 

A continuation of Psychology 542. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

623. Personality Developmet. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2073) 
A study of the basic processes in personality development, the contents 
of personality, and consequences of personality development. 

661. Psychology of the Exceptional Child. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2071) 
An analysis of psychological factors affecting identification and develop- 
ment of mentally retarded children, physically handicapped children, and 
emotionally and socially maladjusted children. 



212 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

662. Mental Deficiency. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2072) 

A survey of types and characteristics of mental defectives; classification 
and diagnosis; criteria for institutional placement and social control of 
mental deficiency. 

Graduate 

These courses are open only to graduate students. For descriptions of 
them, see the Graduate School Bulletin. 

726. Educational Psychology. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2096) 

727. Child Growth and Development. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2097) 

728. Measurement and Evaluation. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 2098) 

729. Mental Hygiene for Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2099) 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND RECREATION 

Roy D. Moore, Chairman 

The objectives of the Department of Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation are: 

1. To provide instruction in a wide variety of physical education activities 
to meet the needs and interests of all students in the required general 
education program of the University. 

2. To promote participation in wholesome extra-class activities through 
sponsoring and supervising such organizations as the Aquatics Club, 
Cheerleaders' Squad, Dance Group, Gymnastics Club, Women's Athletic 
Association, Intramural Leagues, and Officiating Club. 

3. To provide recreational outlets for students and members of the 
College community through conduct of informal recreational activities. 

4. To enrich the total University program through cooperation with the 
programs of such units of the University as the music and dramatic 
groups, alumni association, agricultural homemaking groups, guidance 
and health service divisions. 

5. To provide necessary preparation for students planning careers as 
teachers of elementary, junior and senior high school health and physi- 
cal education and as athletic coaches and recreational administrators. 

6. To provide courses in health, physical education which meet Sate and 
National Teacher Certification standards. 

7. To provide courses in Recreation which meet guidelines of National 
Recreation and Park Administration. 



School of Education 



213 



Each major is required to complete a minimum total of fourteen com- 
petencies of the following: 

3 — Team Sports 

3 — Individual and Dual Sports 

2 — Gymnastics 

2 — Dance 

4 — Swimming- 
Each major is also required to specialize in one of the following areas: 
Team Sports, Individual and Dual Sports (includes officiating), Gymnastics, 
Dance or Swimming. 

During the Junior and Senior years before student teaching, the major 
will be assigned to an instructor and assist in the basic program. Freshmen 
Physical Education majors will be placed in PE 101 and PE 102. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MAJORS 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

History 101 — 

Social Science 100 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Physical Science 100 — 

Physical Education 101, 102, 103, and 104 1 

English 102 (1 hour either semester) — 

Education 100 1 

Air or Military Science or Electives 1 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
3 



17 + 



1 
1 
1 

16 + 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 300, 301 2 

English 250 2 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Zoology 160 — 

Health Education 200, 220 2 

Physical Education 229, 231 1 

Physical Education 234 (W), 235 (W) 1 

Physical Education 237 (M), 238 (M) 1 

Physical Education 246 (W), 247 (W) 1 

Physical Education 249 (M), 251 (M) 1 

Physical Education 261, 361 1 

Air or Military Science (Optional) 2 

21 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



2 
20 



214 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 400 3 

Psychology 436 — 

Zoology 469, 560 3 

Health Education 440 2 

Physical Education 445 ■ — • 

Physical Education 446 3 

Health Education 442 — 

Physical Education 448, 450 1 

Physical Education 451, 452 1 

Physical Education 453 (W), 455 (W) . 2 

Physical Education 456 (M), 458 2 

Physical Education 460, 461 (M) 2 

Physical Education 462 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



21 



19 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Education 501 2 

Health Education 560 2 

Education 500 — 

Physical Education 563 2 

Education 533 — 

Education 560 — 

Physical Education 566 3 

Physical Education 567, 568 1 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



10 



12 



Suggested Program for Recreation Majors 



Freshman Year 



1st Semester 

S. H. 

English 100 4 

Mathematics 101 3 

Social Science 100 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Phy. Ed. 101 or Phy. Ed. 102 1 

English 102 1 

Education 100 1 

Air or Military Sc. (Optional) 1 



2nd Semester 

S.H. 

English 101 4 

Mathematics 102 3 

Social Science 101 3 

Physical Science 101 4 

Phy. Ed. 103 or 104 1 

Education 100 1 

Air or Military Sc. (Optional) 1 



18 



17 



School of Education 



215 



Sophomore Year 



1st Semester 



S.H. 



Humanities 200 3 

Phy. Ed. 460— Community Rec. 2 

English 250— Speech 1 

Psychology 320 — General Psy. . . 3 

H. E. 200— Personal Hygiene ... 2 
Economics 301 — ■ 

Elements of Econ. 3 

Phy. Ed. 261— 

Beginning Swimming 1 

Air or Military Sc. (Optional) 1 



2nd Semester 



S. H. 



Humanities 201 3 

Soc. 203— Prin. of Soc 3 

H. E. 442— First Aid & Safety 3 

Phy. Ed. 229— Dance 1 

H. E. 220— Community Health 2 

Psy. 323— Soc. Psychology 3 

Art 401 — Ceramics 1 

Air or Military Sc. or Elc. 1 



16 



17 



Junior Year 



1st Semester 



Rec. 402 — Field Experience I 
Ind. Art 210— Leathercraft 
Phy. Ed. 361 — Swimming 
Phy. Ed. 231— Dance 
Pol. Sci. 442 — Municipal Gov. 
Phy. Ed. 247— Ind. Sports 

& Rec. Games 

Rec. 464 — Group Leadership 
Music 119 — Recreation 



2nd Semester 



S.H. 

2 

2 
1 
1 
3 

1 

2 
2 



S. H. 



Rec. 408— Field Experience II . 2 

Rec. 463 — Outdoor Recreation 2 
Rec. 465 — Program Planning 

in Recreation 3 

Rec. 466 — Camp Administration 3 

Phy. Ed. 448— Gymnastics 1 

Phy. Ed. 459— Tennis 1 



14 



12 



PE 112— Summer, Field Work I 6 S.H. 



Senior Year 



1st Semester 



2nd Semester 



S.H. 



Rec. 509— Field Exp. Ill 2 

Education 402 — Audiovisual Aids 2 
Rec. 564 — Supervision of Rec. & 

Park Services 3 

PE 566 — Administration 

of HPER 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Elective 1 



S.H. 



Rec. 510— Field Exp. IV 2 

Rec. 561 — Met. or Research & 

Evaluation in Recreation .... 3 

Soc. 204— Social Problems 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Electives 4 



14 



15 



216 North Carolina A. and T. State University 



HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES 

Undergraduate 

200. Personal Hygiene. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2700) 

This course is designed to give the student definite knowledge of the 
principles of personal health, both mental and physical, and to prepare him 
for self guidance through and beyond the college years. Emphasis is placed 
upon information pertinent to social behavior today and upon effective 
approaches to college living. 

220. Community Health. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2720) 
An introductory study of environmental factors which affect health. Em- 
phasis will be placed upon the health of the group rather than that of the 
individual. Consumer health, community resources for health and prevention 
and control of disease through organized community efforts will be stressed. 
(Prerequisite 200.) 

HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES FOR MAJOR STUDENTS 

440. Advanced Hygiene and Principles of Health Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2740) 
A comprehensive review of health facts and scientific principles applicable 
to the prospective teacher, the school child, and the community. Funda- 
mentals of health promotion in the school program are considered. (Pre- 
requisite: HE 200, 201.) 

442. First Aid, Safety, and Prevention of Injuries. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2745) 
Techniques of first aid to the injured in the home, school and community 
and the teaching of safety measures to be practiced in daily living; the 
prevention and care of the injuries occurring in physical education classes 
and in competitive sports. The standard Red Cross First Aid Certificate is 
awarded upon successful completion of the course. (Prerequisite: Zoo. 469.) 

560. The Teaching of Health Education. Credit 2(2-1) 

(Formerly 2760) 
Methods, materials and procedures for the teaching of health in the 
elementary and secondary schools. (Prerequisites: Health Education 220 and 
442, Zool. 469, 560 and HE 440.) 

ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE 
HEALTH COURSES 

651. Personal, School and Community Health Problems. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2771) 
A study of personal, school and community health problems and resources. 
Emphasis is placed on the control of communicable diseases, healthful 
school living and the development of individuals of the scientific attitude 
and a positive philosophy of healthful living. 



School of Education 217 

652. Methods and Materials in Health Education for 

Elementary and Secondary School Teachers. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2772) 

A study of the fundamentals of the school health program, pupil needs, 
methods, planning instruction, teaching techniques, selection and evalua- 
tion of materials for the elementary and secondary programs, and the use 
of the community resources. 



GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT 

Requirements for Women 

FRESHMEN REQUIREMENTS: Physical Education 102 and 104 

Requirements for Men 

FRESHMEN REQUIREMENTS: Physical Education 101 and 103 

101. Fundamentals of Physical Education. Men. Fall. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2701) 

To develop an understanding of the value and the logic behind exercise 
and sports activity and regular habits of exercise, to determine the physical 
fitness needs of the student with the nature, basic rules, techniques and 
skills of a wide variety of popular American sports and guide him into 
activities which will be of most interest and benefit to him now and in the 
future. 

102. Fundamentals of Physical Education I. (Women). Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2702) 

Movement exploration, basic concepts, activities, skills, and form essential 
to play and work. Evaluation of physical potential and improvement of 
function through progressive sequence or experiences. Sports, dance and 
physical education in contemporary culture. 

103. A continuation of 101. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2703) 

104. Fundamentals of Physical Education II. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2704) 

261. Swimming, Beginning. Fall or Spring. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2711) 

To teach the elementary skills as outlined in the American Red Cross 
Standards for beginning swimmers. 

112. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2712) 
Special activities designed for those students whose physical examination 
show that they are unable to participate in the regular physical education 
classes. 

262. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2713) 

A continuation of 112. 



218 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

251. Softball, Soccer, and Volleyball (Men). Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2721) 

To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills in 
softball, soccer, and volleyball. 

252. Touch Football, Speedball, and Basketball. (Men). Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2722) 

To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills in 
touch football, speedball, and volleyball. 

234. Team Sports: Hockey, Soccer, Basketball (Women). Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2724) 

Fundamental techniques, rules, strategy, terminology, and cultural sig- 
nificance of field hockey, soccer and basketball. 

235. Team Sports: Volleyball, Speedball, Softball. (W). Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2725) 

Fundamental techniques, rules, strategy, terminology and cultural sig- 
nificance of volleyball, speedball, and softball. 

246. Individual Sports: Archery, Tennis, Badminton, Golf. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2726) 
Fall or Spring. Techniques, rules, playing courtesies, and significance of 
individual sports to college and after school life. 

247. Individual Sports: Recreational Games. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2727) 

Shuffleboard, handball, deck tennis, table tennis, croquet, modified bowl- 
ing and horseshoe. 

261. Swimming for Intermediates. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2728) 

229. Modern Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2729) 
To develop an understanding of the various qualities of movement; the 
techniques of obtaining and applying them in the art form of dance. 

231. Folk and Tap Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2731) 
Clog, tap and folk dances characteristic of many nationalities. 

263. Rhythmics. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2732) 
Suitable types of rhythmical activities for boys and men including funda- 
mental movements, folk, tap, social dance and singing games. 

233. Social and Country Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2733) 
Ballroom, square, and round dance forms; fundamentals leading and 
following, dance etiquette. 

450. Advanced Gymnastics (M) (W). Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2734) 
Men: Fundamental skills and routines on the following gymnastics ap- 
paratus: rings, parallel bars, horizontal bar, and side horse. 



School of Education 219 

Women: Fundamental skills and routines on the following gymnastic 
apparatus: uneven parallel bars, balance beam, side horse vault, and floor 
exercise. This course will include basic evaluation and methods. 

454. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2735) 
A continuation of 262. 

248. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2736) 

A continuation of 454. 

441. Beginning Golf. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2741) 
To develop performance skills and techniques in golf. 

443. Skating for Beginners. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2742) 
To develop performance skills and techniques in ice skating. 

457. Bowling. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2743) 
To develop performance skills and techniques in bowling. 

459. Beginning Tennis and Badminton. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2744) 
To develop an understanding of rules, strategy and performance skills in 
tennis and badminton. 

463. Swimming, Life Saving. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2757) 
To teach the fundamental skills and techniques as outlined in the Ameri- 
can Red Cross Standards for Life Saving and Water Safety. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES FOR MAJOR STUDENTS 

237. Group Games, Football and Basketball. Credit 1(0-3) 
(Formerly 2737) 

Practice methods and applied techniques of a large variety of games of 
lower organization of the circle, group; and line types which might be 
suitable for playground, gymnasium, camp and for adult gatherings. Con- 
centration on developing performance skills and understanding of football 
and basketball. 

238. Baseball, Track and Field. Credit 1(0-3) 
(Formerly 2738) 

To develop performance skills, methods, and techniques in baseball, track 
and field. 

249. Individual Sports and Combatives. Credit 1(0-3) 
(Formerly 2739) 

To develop performance skills in combatives and a wide variety of in- 
dividual sports including shuffleboard, handball, table tennis, badminton, 
croquet, archery, golf, and tennis. 



220 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

240. Introduction to Physical Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2740) 
Survey of the nature and scope of physical education; interpretation of 
objectives and philosophy of physical education as a part of the total educa- 
tional program. Qualifications, responsibilities, and opportunities of pro- 
fessional personnel. Evaluation of personal fitness and suitability to area 
of interest. 

456. Teaching of Soccer, Football and Basketball. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2745) 
Consideration is given to the teaching of history, rules, performance skills, 
methods or organizing practices, strategy, team offenses and defenses, and 
various formations for the three sports. 

458. Lifesaving and Water Safety. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2746) 
The teaching of swimming and lifesaving. Skills required for the Ameri- 
can Red Cross standard Life Saving Certificate; instruction in desirable 
methods and techniques for the teaching of swimming and aquatic events. 
Prerequisite: 361 or equivalent. 

448. Gymnastics I. (Men and Women). Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2747) 
An introduction to the basic skills of tumbling, floor exercise, trampoline 
and different types of vaulting. The course will include methods and basic 
evaluation. 

461. The Teaching of Individual Sports and Net Games. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 2748) 

Methods and techniques for teaching individual sports including shuffle- 
board, handball, table tennis, badminton, archery, deck tennis, volley ball, 
newcomb, and paddle tennis. 

446. History and Principles of Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2749) 
The evolution of physical education from the earliest time to the present 
day. Consideration of the relationship of physical education to education and 
to national life and ideas through the different historical periods. A critical 
analysis of the scientific basis for physical education with applications of 
the aims and objectives to the modern concepts of education. 

462. Elementary School Physical Education. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 2751) 

Philosophy, program planning, and method for teaching children. Obser- 
vation and instruction of children at various grade levels. Experiences in 
simple games, relays, stunts, tumbling, creative rhythms and dance move- 
ment exploration. (Prerequisite: 240 — Admittance to the Teacher Education 
Program.) 

445. Kinesiology. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2752) 
A study of the body movements, types of muscles exercise and their re- 
lation to the problems of body development. (Prerequisite: Zoology 469.) 



School of Education 221 

451. Dance Composition. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2753) 

The rhythmical and musical basis of dance, the elements of dance con- 
struction. Theory and practice of skills involved. (Prerequisite: 229.) 

453. Techniques and Methods in Fall and Indoor Activities. Credit 2(1-4) 
(Formerly 2754) 
Theory and practice of field hockey, soccer, archery, golf, basketball,, 
gymnastics, and apparatus. Analysis of performance skills, materials and 
techniques. Opportunity for officiating and obtaining local and national 
official rating. 

452. Applied Dance. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2755) 

A coordinated course designed to increase skill in technique and the use 
of related art materials. (Prerequisites: 229, 231, 451.) 

455. Techniques and Methods of Seasonal and 

Indoor Activities. Credit 2(1-4) 

(Formerly 2756) 
Theory and practice of volleyball, recreational games, speedball, softball, 
tennis, badminton, track, and field. Materials and teaching techniques, 
analysis of skills involved. Opportunity for obtaining officials' ratings. 

560. Methods of Research and Evaluation in Health 

and Physical Education. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly 2760) 
Same as Education 501. 

460. Community Recreation. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2761) 
A study of city, state, and national organization. Practice in the general 
principles and techniques in the organization and promotion of leisure 
activities for home, school, and community. 

469. The Physiology of Exercise. Credit 3(2-2) 

The purpose of this course is to observe and record the effects of physical 

activity on the organic systems and service organs of the human body and 

to learn basic laboratory techniques and procedures of physical education. 

562. The Teaching of Physical Education. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 2762) 

Same as Education 533. 

563. Adapted Physical Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2763) 

Methods of examining and determining needs of the handicapped; activi- 
ties suitable for individuals with abnormal body conditions, and the conduct 
of a program of restricted activities to meet their needs. 

564. Minor Problems in Health Education and 

Physical Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly 2764) 

This course is designed primarily for seniors to provide them with an 
opportunity to investigate selected professional problems. 



222 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

565. Problems in Physical Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2765) 

Special administrative problems in the organization of physical education 
programs and the coordination of the different phases pertinent to men and 
women of professional construction in the light of historical backgrounds, 
intramural activities, girls' athletics, athletic insurance, and athletic asso- 
ciations. 

566. The Organization and Administration of Health 

and Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2766) 
Philosophy and policies in the administration of a health and physical 
education program, including health service, healthful school living, health 
instruction, the classification of students, the staff, teaching loads, time 
schedule, finance, the gymnasium, locker-rooms, equipment, intramural and 
inter-scholastic athletics. (Prerequisites: 446 and permission of advisor.) 

567. Advanced Techniques and Methods in Physical 

Education Activities. Credit 1(0-2) 

(Formerly 2767) 
A course designed to increase skill in technique and the use of related 
materials in the areas of dance, sports, gymnastics, aquatics, fundamentals 
of marching and conditioning activities. Emphasis is placed upon the de- 
velopment of competency in areas of individual student weakness. 

568. Physical Education Specialization. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly 2768) 

A continuation of 471. Opportunities for careful exploration in dance, 
aquatics, sports, gymnastics through skill improvement, independent study, 
field experience and special projects pertinent to the particular area of 
interest. 

COURSES FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENTS 

655. Current Problems and Trends in Physical Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2775) 

A practical course for experienced teachers. Consideration given to in- 
dividual problems in physical education with analysis of present trends. 

656. Administration of Interscholastic and Intramural 

Athletics. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2776) 

A study of the relation of athletics to education, and the problems of 

finance, facilities, scheduling eligibility, and insurance. Consideration given 

to the organization and administration of intramural activities in the school 

program. 

657. Community Recreation. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2777) 

A study of the recreational facilities and problems with consideration 
being given to the promotion of effective recreational programs in rural 
and urban communities. 

658. Current Theories and Practices of Teaching Sports. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2778) 

Methodology and practice at various skill levels. Emphasis placed on 
seasonal activity. 



School of Education 223 

Recreation Courses 

402. Field Experience I. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly 2702) 

Laboratory experiences during the semester in an operating recreational 
program. 

408. Field Experience II. Credit 2(0-4) 

(Formerly 2708) 
Practices in a second agency of Field Experience. 

509. Field Experience HI. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 2709) 

Practices in a third agency of Field Experience. 

510. Field Experience IV. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 2710) 

Practices in a fourth agency of Field Experience. 

112. Summer Field Experience. Credit 6(0-6) 

(Formerly 2712) 
A placement program conducted in cooperation with a formal recreation 
agency. The student is assigned to an agency during the summer. The 
student is required to maintain records of daily experiences relative to 
organization, programs, problems, supervision, conferences and budget. 

464. Group Leadership. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 2750) 

Techniques in group dynamics and methods of developing group leader- 
ship capabilities. 

463. Principles and Practices of Outdoor Recreation. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2763) 
Philosophy, organization, administration and laboratory experiences in 
outdoor recreation. 

561. Methods of Research and Evaluation in Recreation. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 2760) 
The application of methods of research and evaluation to the various 
problems in recreation. 

564. Supervision of Recreation and Park Services. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 2764) 
An analysis and investigation of supervision of employees involved in 
recreational services. 

465. Program Planning in Recreation. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2765) 

This course is an analysis of recreation programs. Emphasis is placed on 
objectives, personnel and facilities. 

466. Camp Administration. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 2766) 

The organization and administration of camp activities. Programming 
camping activities that will apply to all ages and both sexes. 



224 North Carolina A. and T. State University 



DEPARTMENT OF ADULT EDUCATION AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 

*B. W. Harris, Chairman 

Sampson Buie, Acting Chairman 

The Department of Adult Education and Community Services brings into 
focus the resources of the University to serve the needs of individuals, 
groups, institutions, agencies, and committees for educative, consultative 
and other related services. Organized for the expressed purpose to aid in 
fulfilling the University's extension function, the department has the follow- 
ing objectives: 

The department is divided into formal and informal educational activities 
for adults and out-of-school youth. 

Formal Activities. 

The formal activities include a program of evening studies geared for 
those who desire to earn a bachelor's degree on a part-time student basis. 
(1) Students who desire to enter the Evening Program for academic credit 
are required to meet the same entrance requirements as regularly enrolled 
university student. (2) Residence credit at the undergraduate level is given 
for on-campus evening classes. Furthermore, courses are offered for both 
academic credit and non-academic credit for self-improvement. The Depart- 
ment also has a program of selected adult education courses of a non- 
credit category for adults without any special academic requirements. 

Informal Services. 

This part of the University's program makes available to the state a 
group of varying institutes, workshops, seminars, clinics, conferences, short- 
courses and special programs geared to meet the needs of business, industry, 
teachers and other vocational groups which fall into the range of available 
human resources among the faculty and other resource people. 



*On leave. 



DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

AND TECHNOLOGY 



. DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
• DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 



DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY 

Charles W. Pinckney, Director 

In responding to increasing interest and requests for the type of academic 
service embodied in the technology of modern industry the Division of In- 
dustrial Education and Technology identifies its primary function. The 
Division administers training programs leading to careers in teaching 
industrial subjects and related technological-middle management positions 
for industry, commerce and governmental agencies. These programs provide 
collegiate-level preparation for a family of careers that require a common 
background of knowledge and understanding of modern industrial-production 
operations and management. 

The breadth and depth of offerings by the Division accommodate maxi- 
mum flexibility in choice of career preparation permitting development of 
the technical background necessary to many contemporary and emerging 
professional employment opportunities. 

The Division is organized into two departments, namely industrial edu- 
cation and industrial technology. These departments provide respectively 
teacher training and preparation for industrial-technical-management 
careers. 

Admission to the Division 

The admission of students to programs offered by the Division is based 
upon general admission requirements of the University for collegiate-level 
work. Transfer students from other approved institutions, including junior 
colleges, may be admitted with advanced standing after having such credits 
earned elsewhere evaluated by our Admissions Office. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

George C. Gail, Chairman 

This department offers two major undergraduate curricular for the prep- 
aration of industrial arts and vocational industrial education teachers, re- 
spectively. It also offers graduate curricular in these two fields leading to 
the Master of Science degree. A service curriculum in Driver and Safety 
Education leading to teacher certification in this field is provided to in- 
terested students. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

Industrial arts teachers generally work with public school and college 
students helping them gain a fuller understanding of various areas of in- 
dustry; its materials, production methods, resulting products, and personnel. 

Teaching careers in industrial arts are open to competent young men and 
women possessing creativeness, ingenuity and inventiveness; and who enjoy 
working with youth and adults. The curriculum encompasses a study of 
many technological areas such as manufacturing, construction, communica- 
tions and transportation. More specifically; opportunities are provided for 
gaining experience in drafting and design, woodworking, electricity-elec- 
tronics, metalworking, leathercraft, plastics, printing, photography and 
ceramics. In addition to acquiring knowledge of teaching techniques, in- 
dustrial organizations and occupations; students are actively involved in 

227 



228 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



studying, planning-, organizing 1 , constructing, experimenting, testing, servic- 
ing, and evaluating materials, processes and products of industry. 

OPPORTUNITIES : Excellent employment opportunities exist for In- 
dustrial Arts teachers. The public schools and colleges of North Carolina, 
and other states, are in constant need of securing qualified teachers for 
industrial arts classes. Many opportunities also exist for industrial arts 
graduates to participate as instructors, supervisors, or directors in various 
programs of industry; government agencies; rehabilitation and manual arts 
therapy centers; and private, military and technical schools. Those desiring 
advanced training are prepared for gradaute schools. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Industrial Education 260, 261 2 

Mechanical Engineering 101, 102 2 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

Biological Science 100 4 

Physical Science 100 — 

Physical Education — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

2 
2 
4 
3 

4 

1 



15 



16 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Industrial Education 263, 463 3 

Industrial Education 233, 234 3 

Industrial Technology 210, 213 4 

Industrial Technology 230, 231 3 

Industrial Technology 470, 471 3 

Speech 250 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

2 
3 
4 
3 
3 
2 



16 



17 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Industrial Education 210, 211 2 

Industrial Education 412 4 

Industrial Education 462, 465 2 

Psychology 320 (2020) 3 

Education 400 (2154) — 

History 100, 101 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Economics 301 (2840) — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



16 



Division of Industrial Education and Technology 



229 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Industrial Education 510 2 

Industrial Education 566 3 

Psychology 436 3 

Economics 501 3 

Health Education 200 2 

Sociology 203 3 

Electives — 

Education 500 — 

Education 560 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 



11 



Total 124 Hours 



VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Since the vocational industrial education teacher works with high school 
students who are interested in training for a single occupation or occupa- 
tional family, his professional preparation must reflect a concentration of 
study in his chosen occupational field. In addition to developing teaching 
competencies, these trainees must choose their concentrated teaching field 
from five options; namely: automotive industry, construction industry, 
drafting, electrical industries and metal industries. 

A high interest in the trade or occupational family and in working with 
people is necessary for success as a teacher in this field. Two years of trade 
experience, beyond the learning period, is required of applicants to this 
teaching field in North Carolina. 



VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Industrial Education 260, 261 2 

Mechanical Engineering 101, 102 2 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 

Biological Science 100, Physical Science 101 . 4 

Physical Education — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

2 
2 
4 
4 
4 
1 



16 



17 



230 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 263, 463 3 2 

^Industrial Education 233 3 — 

* industrial Technology 210 4 — 

Industrial Technology Electricity- 
Electronic Elective — 3 

Industrial Technology 470 3 — 

Physics 211, 212 4 4 

Speech 250 — 2 

Technical Electives — 6 

17 17 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 462, 465 2 2 

Psychology 320 3 — 

Education 400 — 3 

History 100, 101 3 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Economics 301, 501 3 3 

Technical Electives 3 3 

17 17 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Industrial Education 566 3 — 

Psychology 436 3 — 

Sociology 203 3 — 

Health Education 200 2 — 

Technical Elective 3 — 

Education 500 — 3 

Education 560 — 6 

14 9 
Total: 124 Hours 



♦Construction Industries majors substitute IE 432 for IE 233. 
"Automotive Industries majors substitute IT 253 for 210. 



Division of Industrial Education and Technology 231 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

(15 Semester hours minimum from one of the following areas) 

Semester 

AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRIES: Credit Hours 

IT 254 Fuel and Electrical Systems 4 

IT 255 Transmissions and Hydraulics Systems 4 

IT 451 Internal Combustion Engines and Transportation 4 

IT 452 Advanced Engine Servicing 4 

Other electives: IT 251 and 455 

CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES: 

IT 215 Construction Methods (Frame) 4 

IT 216 Masonry Construction (Brick) 4 

IT 217 Masonry Construction (Concrete) 4 

IT 571 Heating, Ventilation and Refrigeration 4 

Other electives: IT 411, 412, 413, 414, and 575 

DRAFTING: 

IE 234 Industrial Arts Drawing 3 

IE 235 Technical Drafting 3 

IE 434 Advanced Architectural Drafting 3 

IE 436 Machine Design Drafting 3 

IE 536 Tool and Machine Design 3 

Other electives: IE 430, 432 and 435 

ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIES: 

IT 231 Electronic Circuits 3 

IT 234 Electronic Instrumentation 4 

IT 235 Semi-Conductor Electronics 3 

IT 430 Video Electronics 4 

IT 432 Electronic Communications 2 

Other electives: IT 431, 433, and 434 

METAL INDUSTRIES: 

IT 472 Manufacturing Processes Production I 4 

IT 473 Manufacturing Processes Production II 4 

IT 474 Dimensional Metrology 4 

IT 475 Manufacturing Processes Metallurgy 4 

Other electives: 471 and 570 

COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
Undergraduate 

CRAFTS 

210. Introduction to Leather Craft. Credit 2(1-2) 

(Formerly LA. 3520) 
Fundamentals of materials, tools and skills used in leather craft. 



232 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

211. Designing, Carving and Stamping Leather Craft. Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly LA. 3521) 
Continuation of 210 — Advanced carving and stamping. 

218. Repair and Maintenance of Home Furniture. Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly LA. 3528) 
A course designed to help homemaking teachers meet specific problems 
in the improvement and care of home furniture. Instruction in simple 
upholstery techniques and other processes using tools and accessories for 
home repair. Finishing and refinishing wood. Students encouraged to make 
an effort to provide their own work projects. 

412. Upholstery — Furniture Construction. Credit 4(2-6) 
(Formerly LA. 3542) 

Principles and techniques of webbing, spring, stuffing, padding and cover- 
ing upholstered furniture. Course includes chair frame construction, prin- 
ciples of woodturning, wood finishing and refinishing techniques. 

413. Woodturning. Credit 2(1-3) 
(Formerly LA. 3543) 

Spindle and face plate turning, re-chucking, plug chucking, finishing and 
polishing on wood lathes. Emphasis on methods and techniques of teaching 
woodturning. 

415. Comprehensive Shop Projects. Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly LA. 3545) 
General construction, repairs, maintenance work or advanced projects in- 
volving woodturning, carving, inlaying, upholstering and wood and metal 
finishing, metals, electricity-electronics, graphic arts. 

510. General Shop. Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly LA. 3560) 
Purpose and organization of general shops, instructional materials and 
procedures. Shop operating problems including personnel organization and 
equipment selection, project construction on a general shop basis. 

GRAPHIC ARTS 

230. Introduction to Photography. Credit 3(1-5) 
(Formerly 4406) 

This course is designed to acquaint the beginner with the fundamental 
processes of photography. Training is given in the nomenclature, operation 
and maintenance of various cameras — the use of exposure meters — film 
development — contact printing and enlarging — preparation and storage of 
chemical solutions. Students are encouraged to provide their own cameras. 

231. Advanced Photography. Credit 3(1-5) 
(Formerly 4408) 

This course is a continuation of 230. Emphasis is given to larger cameras — 
studio lighting — portraiture — copying — refinement of darkroom techniques — 
spotting of negatives and prints — selection of chemicals and papers. 

233. Industrial Arts Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 

(Formerly LA. 3526) 
A course for acquisition of information and development of skills needed 
by teachers of drafting. Instruction in A.S.A. conventions, projections, 



Division of Industrial Education and Technology 233 

revolutions, developments, lettering and pictorial representation with ref- 
erence to machine, furniture drawing, sheetmetal drawing, shading, tech- 
nical sketching, production illustration and industrial arts design. Pre- 
requisite: Mechanical Engineering 102. 

234. Industrial Arts Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 
(Formerly LA. 3527) 

Continuation of LA. 3526, including, basic elements in the planning and 
construction of residential buildings. Problems in floor plans, elevations, 
details and perspective. Study of kitchen, living room, dining room, bath- 
room and bedroom design. Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 233. 

235. Technical Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 
(Formerly 4321) 

Problems involving maps, charts, graphs and electrical drawings. Em- 
phasis on drawings used in design, construction, installation, and main- 
tenance of electrical-electronic equipment; schematic, single line, connection 
and interconnection diagrams; chassis layout, printed circuits, electrical 
codes and standards. Introduction to aircraft and marine drafting. 

430. Technical Illustrations and Design. Credit 3(1-5) 

(Formerly 4300) 
Survey of design principles, practices and literature. Axonometric illustra- 
tion, templates, overlays, bisuals, perspectives, air brush. 

432. Architectural Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 

(Formerly 4320) 
Planning residential structures. Construction and design principles floor, 
plot, heating electrical, plumbing plans; elevations, sections, details and 
perspectives. F.H.A. standards, building codes, cost estimates. Problems 
selected to meet individual needs. 

434. Advanced Architectural Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 
(Formerly 4340) 

Planning industrial, commercial and public buildings. Construction and 
design principles, materials, specifications and codes; complete plans in- 
cluding: plot, landscaping, framing, electrical and mechanical equipment; 
structural details; reinforced concrete, timber and steel. Advanced per- 
spective rendering, analytical study of historical and contemporary archi- 
tecture; materials, methods and engineering. 

435. Architectural Design. Credit 3(1-5) 
(Formerly 4301) 

Planning and structural problems of buildings and their relationship to 
other buildings and space. Studies of urban and rural planning; considera- 
tion of interior planning, landscape, townscape, projects carried to working 
detail. 

436. Machine Design Drafting. Credit 3(1-5) 
(Formerly 4341) 

Advanced machine drawing; dimensions, analysis of motion, motion dia- 
grams. Motion layout of threads; spur, bevel, worm gears and cams. 
Forging, pattern, piping, welding, structural practice, nomography; auxili- 
ary views, revolutions, pictorial views. A.S.A., S.A.E., Aerospace standards. 



234 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

536. Tool and Machine Design. Credit 3(1-5) 

(Formerly 4360) 

Fundamentals of tool design, cutting tools, punches and die design, gage 
design, jigs and fixtures; indexing and coding procedures. Design, assembly 
and detail drawings of machines, tools and parts. 

DRIVER AND SAFETY EDUCATION 

253. Driver Education and Traffic Safety. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 4123) 
To train students who may wish to teach driver education in the public 
schools. Emphasis will be placed on the objective and scope of driver educa- 
tion, traffic laws, preventive maintenance, skill developing exercises and 
aids to teaching. 

454. Driver Education, Principles & Methods. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 4171) 
Students will concentrate on a study of personality factors related to 
unsafe driving behavior. The course will include investigation of how 
attitudes develop, relation of personality factors, family relations, and 
methods of understanding and changing the unsatisfactory attitudes. 

555. Shop Safety Education. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly I.E. 3565) 
This course provides the necessary lesson units and methods of teaching 
school shop safety, as well as plans for developing complete shop safety 
education programs. 

PROFESSIONAL 

260. Foundations of Industrial Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3530) 

An orientation course in industrial education. Course requirements pro- 
gram operation, regulation. Familiarize the student with the underlying 
philosophy, basic principles, and history of industrial arts and vocational 
education. 

261. Vocational Industrial Education. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3531) 

Planning, organizing, administering, supervising, evaluating and inter- 
preting trade and industrial education programs. Special consideration 
given to organization and responsibilities of local, state and national 
agencies. 

263. Modern Industry. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly I.E. 3550) 
A study of the function, organization, materials, and processes of in- 
dustry, for interpretation of industry in secondary school industrial educa- 
tion programs 

462. School Shop Design & Management. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly I.E. 3552) 
An analysis of general education and industrial education programs and 
objectives. Emphasis on planning and designing shops, equipment selection 
and specifications, shop management, maintenance and safety. 



Division of Industrial Education and Technology 235 

463. Vocation Guidance. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly I.E. 3553) 
Principles and techniques of guidance and counseling in junior and senior 
high schools. With emphasis on the study of industrial occupations and 
guidance as it relates to industrial education classes. 

465. Instructional Analysis Techniques. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly I.E. 3555) 
Methods of analyzing occupations for the purpose of securing teaching 
content and determining instructional order. Trade elements analyzed for 
instructional content. Methods of developing elements into courses and 
preparation of instructional materials. Prerequisite: 463. 

566. Methods of Teaching Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly I.E. 3566) 
Methods of presenting related information, procedures in giving demon- 
strations with tools and machines, testing and grading shop work, course 
of study construction, and lesson planning. Prerequisites: I.E. 462, 463, 465. 
Observation and Student Teaching — See Education 560. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

616. Plastic Craft. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly LA. 3576) 

For teachers of industrial arts, arts and crafts, and those interested in 
plastics as a hobby. Operations in plastics analyzed and demonstrated; 
design, color, kinds and uses of plastics, how plastics are made and sold; 
vocational information. Projects suitable for class use constructed. 

617. General Crafts. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 3577) 

Principles and techniques of crafts used in school activity programs. 
Emphasis on materials, tools, and processes used in elementary schools and 
industrial arts courses. Open to all persons interested in craft instruction 
for professional or non-professional use. 

618. Elementary School Industrial Education Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 3586) 

Aims, content, equipment, and methods utilized in programs designed to 
integrate K-6 elementary school activities with the study of industry and 
technology. 

635. Graphic Arts. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly I.E. 3575) 
Fundamentals of typography, hand composition, press operation, block 
printing, silk screen techniques, and other reproduction methods, and book- 
binding. 

651. Driver Ed. and Teacher Training. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 4143) 
This course provides the student with the necessary preparation to 
organize and administer the high school driver education program. Special 
attention will be given to methods and resources, scheduling and evaluation. 
Laboratory experience will be provided on the dual control automobile and 
simulation. 



236 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

653. Driver Education and General Safety. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly 4173) 
Designed to present facts and information concerning the cost, in money 
and human suffering, of accidents in home, industry, school, and transporta- 
tion. Included is the establishment of knowledge and background conducive 
to the development of personal activities and practices which reduce 
accidents. 

660. Industrial Cooperative Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3579) 

For prospective teachers of vocational education. Principles, organization 
and administration of industrial cooperative training programs. 

661. Organization of Related Study Materials. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3580) 

Principles of scheduling and planning pupil's course and work experiences, 
selecting and organizing related instructional materials in I.C.T. Programs. 
Prerequisite: I.E. 660. 

662. Teaching Problems in Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3581) 

Problems involve objectives, curriculum content, text and reference books., 
teaching aids, class organization and administration, safety programs, 
teaching techniques and plans, remedial instructions, industry and com- 
munity relations. Prerequisites: I.E. 462, 465. 

663. History and Philosophy of Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3582) 

Chronological and philosophical development of industrial education with 
special emphasis on its growth and function in American schools. 

GRADUATE 

COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

These courses are open only to graduate students. See the bulletin of the 
Graduate School for descriptions. 

715. Comprehensive General Shop. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly LA. 3590) 

717. Industrial Arts Problems I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly LA. 3587) 

718. Industrial Arts Problems II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly LA. 3588) 

719. Advanced Furniture Design and Construction. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 3589) 

731. Advanced Drafting Techniques. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly LA. 3591) 

762. Construction and Use of Instructional Aids. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly LA. 3592) 

763. General Industrial Education Programs. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3593) 



Division of Industrial Education and Technology 237 

764. Supervision and Administration of Industrial Education. 

(Formerly I.E. 3594) Credit 3(3-0) 

765. Testing in Industrial Subjects. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3595) 

766. Curriculum Laboratory in Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3596) 

767. Research and Literature in Industrial Education. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3597) 

768. Industrial Education Seminar. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly I.E. 3598) 

769. Thesis Research in Industrial Education. Credit 3 hrs. 
(Formerly I.E. 3599) 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

Andrew W. Williams, Chairman 

The department offers one baccalaureate degree program with four 
options in major technology areas. The Bachelor of Science in Industrial 
Technology embodies a curriculum to select and prepare technologists for 
specialization and professional responsibilities in the technical-management 
phase of industry. The principal curriculum areas of the degree are as 
follows: 

1. Major Technology (Option) 

2. Physical Science 

3. Business Management 

4. General Education 

The major technology option is chosen from construction, electronics, 
engine power or manufacturing and prepares the student for specialization 
in the chosen field of industry. A good foundation is the physical sciences 
and mathematics establishes a base upon which continued study and educa- 
tional advancement may be built. Study in the area of business management 
affords the students opportunities for advancement in the managerial and 
supervisory concomitants of his chosen technical option. The general educa- 
tion requirements aid the student in the cultural and social maturity pro- 
viding a basis for understanding and performing his role in society. 

DEPARTMENTAL OBJECTIVES 

The objectives of the Department of Industrial Technology are as follows: 

1. To develop an understanding of industry and methods of production 
and the influence of industrial products and services upon the pattern 
of modern social and economic life. 

2. To develop an appreciation of good design and workmanship in their 
application to construction and to manufactured products. 

3. To experience a challenging program of instructional activities de- 
signed to meet the requirements of employment in modern technology, 
including science and business management. 

4. To acquire a high degree of competence in his chosen technical elective. 



238 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 

Phys Science 100, Bio Science 100* 4 

M.E. 101, 102 2 

Ind. Technology 271, 272 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
4 
4 
2 
2 



16 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Soc. Science 100, 101 3 

I.T. 210 4 

I.T. 253 — 

Drafting Electives 3 

Physics 211, 212 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

17 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Health Education 200 2 

Mathematics 240 3 

Ind. Ed. 263 — 

Speech 250 — 

Accounting 221** — 

Ind. Tech. 230 3 

Technical Electives 4 

B.A. 304 — 

Elective 3 



16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 15 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Ind. Tech. 476 2 — 

Ind. Tech. 411 or M.E. 339 — 2 

Psychology 320 3 — 

B.A. 305, 569*** 3 3 

Ind. Tech. 575 2 — 

Ind. Ed. 565 — 2 

Technical Electives 4 4 

Electives — 3 

14 14 
TOTAL: 124 Semester Hours 

♦Chemistry 100(1611), 101(1612) may be substituted for Bio Science and Physical 

Science. _ , 
**The business courses listed in the Junior and Senior year are recommended. Utner 
business or economic courses may be acceptable. 
♦♦♦Psychology 445 may be substituted. 
NOTE: Military or Air Science is optional. 



Division of Industrial Education and Technology 



239 



COURSES FROM WHICH TECHNICAL OPTIONS MAY BE CHOSEN 

(Minimum 16 semester credit hours from one of the options listed below) 



Semester 
CONSTRUCTION: Credit Hours 

215 Construction Methods 4 

216 Masonry Construction (Brick) 4 

217 Masonry Construction (Concrete) 4 

412 Mechanical Equipment for Buildings 2 

413 Building Construction and Allied Fields 4 

414 Exterior and Interior Finishing 4 

571 Basic Refrigeration Principles 4 

ELECTRONICS: 

231 Electronic Circuits 

234 Electronic Instrumentation 

235 Semi-Conductor Electronics 

430 Video Electronics 

431 Electronic Amplifiers 

432 Electric Communication 

433 Electronic Controls 

434 Industrial Electronics 

571 Basic Refrigeration Principles 

ENGINE POWER: 

254 Automotive Engine Technology 

255 Power Trains and Hydraulics Systems 

451 Automatic Transmissions 

452 Advanced Diagnostic Testing and Servicing 

455 Auto Body Rebuilding and Finishing 

571 Basic Refrigeration Principles 

MANUFACTURING: 

472 Manufacturing Processes — Production I 

473 Manufacturing Processes — Production II 

474 Dimensional Metrology 

475 Manufacturing Processes — Metallurgy 

570 Mechanical Design and Manufacturing Problems 

571 Basic Refrigeration Principles 



COURSES IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 



CONSTRUCTION 



210. Wood Technology. Credit 4(2-6) 

(Formerly 3522) 

A study of woods, forest products, tools and equipment related to the 
woodworking industry. Attention is given to the practical, natural and in- 
dustrial characteristics of the common species of woods that make them 
desirable for specific manufacturing processes and products. Practicability 
for home consumption is also given consideration. Fastening devices and 
adhesives used in the assembly of wood products, as well as the various 
paint materials used in wood finishing are studied. 



240 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

213. Wood Technology. Credit 4(2-6) 

(Formerly 3523) 
An advanced course in home and industrial furniture design. Attention 
is given to the various styles and designs of modern and period furniture. 
The construction and finishing, as well as the tools and equipment used are 
given special study. 

215. Construction Methods. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4221) 

Full size models of various framing sections of dwelling houses are con- 
structed and studied, with special attention being given to building codes 
and zoning laws. The National Building Code is used in conjunction with 
textbooks covering the construction of residence foundations and framing 
systems. Floor framing, wall framing and estimating of materials are in- 
cluded. 

216. Masonry Construction (Brick). Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4228) 

A study of brick and other masonry units used in building construction. 
The course covers interpreting working drawings and specifications, layout 
and methods of construction, and estimating. Construction supervision is 
also included as it relates to job production and quality workmanship. 

217. Masonry Construction (Concrete). Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4229) 

Emphasis is placed on concrete as a building material. A study is made 
of the kinds, properties, and application of concrete in residential and com- 
mercial construction. 

410. Human Relations. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 4223) 

A study of problems in the work-a-day world which will aid one in getting 
along with people on the job, in the community and the home. These units 
of work include: habits one may acquire in order to improve human rela- 
tions, privileges, rights and obligations as a citizen, obtaining and holding 
a job, labor problems, social and commercial insurance and the use of 
leisure time. 

411. Estimating. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 4224) 

Designed to give the student a practical knowledge of all phases of esti- 
mating. Included is the study of working drawings, specifications, contracts, 
codes and the general techniques of estimating. 

412. Mechanical Equipment of Buildings. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 4230) 

The basic principles and advanced practices in the selection, installation, 
operation and maintenance of equipment in the general areas of water 
supply and sanitation, heating systems and electrical materials and 
appliances. 

413. Building Construction and Allied Fields. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4234) 

An introductory course covering the current practices in organizing and 
coordinating the different phases of building construction as a business 
and professional service. 



Division of Industrial Education and Technology 241 

414. Exterior and Interior Trim. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4240) 

Study of structural and finish materials used in architectural construction, 
their properties and manufacture; including, theory and practice of stair 
construction, and methods used in exterior and interior trim of buildings. 

415. Advanced Building Methods. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4241) 

The use of builder's level, staking out building sites, foundations, con- 
crete form construction and complex layout of roofs of all types. Advanced 
blueprint reading, layout and estimating of buildings. Actual practice in 
building residential and commercial type buildings of light frame construc- 
tion. 

ELECTRONICS 

230. Electricity and Electronics. Credit 3(1-5) 
(Formerly 3540) 

Types, characteristics, and operation of tubes and semi-conductors. Power 
supplies, detectors, amplifiers, oscillators and associated circuits. Basic 
residential wiring. Practice in assembly testing and servicing electrical 
devices. 

231. Electronics Circuits. Credit 3(1-5) 
Operating principles and characteristics of communication and naviga- 
tional systems. A.M., F.M., T.V., Radar, Sonar, etc. Transmission and 
reception. Practice in assembling, testing and analysis of circuits. Pre- 
requisite: I.T. 230. 

233. Electric Wiring. Credit 2(1-2) 
(Formerly 4226) 

The study of materials, methods and nomenclature used in residential and 
commercial wiring including a study of National codes, layouts, plans and 
specifications. 

234. Electronic Instrumentation. Credit 4(4-0) 
(Formerly 4404) 

This course emphasizes a variety of electronic instruments such as the 
V.O.M., V.T.V.M., Ohm meters, watt meters, impendance meters, inductance 
checkers, V.U. meters, signal generators, signal tracers, tube testers, 
simulators, analog computer meters, spectrophotometers and oscilloscopes. 
Their application to electronic analyzation and research is emphasized. 

235. Semi-Conductor Electronics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly 4405) 

This is a general course in transistor theory. It includes the study of 
semi-conductor physics, zener diodes, silicon diodes, photo-diodes, and photo- 
transistors as these relate to electronic circuits. Prerequisite: 231. 

430. Video Electronics. Credit 4(2-4) 

(Formerly 4421) 
A study of deflection signals, T.V. amplifiers, synchronization systems, 
integrating networks; microwave, facsimile, R.F. high voltage and pulse 
monochrome networks in video transmitters and receiver systems. Pre- 
requisite: 235. 



242 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

431. Electronic Amplifiers. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 4424) 

The course is designed to cover audio frequencies, magnetic power ampli- 
fiers and industrial computer amplifiers in R.F., V.H.F., S.H.F., and U.H.F, 
systems. Prerequisite: 430. 

432. Electronic Communication. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 4446) 

The theory of electronics utilized in commercial communication systems 
with the fundamental regulation of the F.C.C. first and second class licenses 
with emphasis on A.M., C.B., F.M. broadcast microphone, recorders and 
tape machines, remote facilities, F.M. T.V. transmitters and monitors. Pre- 
requisite: 431. 

433. Electronic Control. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 4468) 

A study of combined control systems utilizing A.C. and D.C. control 
thyratrons, three phase rectification, phase shift preaking transformers and 
motorspeed controls. 

434. Industrial Electronics. Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly 4469) 

A survey of industrial electronic computers, microelectronic, solid state 
device, servomechanism, synchros, staturable reactors, ignitrons, and fre- 
quency guides. 

ENGINE POWER 

251. Internal Combustion Engine and Transportation. Credit 2(1-3) 
(Formerly 4111) 

The history and development of the internal combustion engine and trans- 
portation with laboratory units, disassembly, assembly and study of funda- 
mental component parts and function of the engine systems. 

252. Carburetion and Ignition Maintenance. Credit 2(1-3) 
(Formerly 4112) 

Principles of carburetion, composition of fuels, a study of carburetors and 
fuel systems, testing and adjusting carburetors and fuel pumps. The auto- 
motive electric and ignition systems. Operation, inspection and maintenance 
of batteries and charging system. Proper use of diagnostic equipment. 

253. Power Technology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4114) 

The study of broad basic concepts of energy converting machines and 
devices that man has developed in a technological culture, with emphasis 
on the technical complex, the human complex and the cultural complex of 
technology. 

254. Automotive Engine Technology. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4114) 

Construction, function and principles of operation of all engine com- 
ponents. Functions and principles of engine operating systems. 

255. Transmissions and Hydraulics Systems. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4121) 

Basic principles of heat and friction, hydraulics, levers, and gears. Power 
train construction, function and principles of operation. Prerequisite: 254. 



Division of Industrial Education and Technology 243 

451. Automatic Transmission Servicing. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4131) 

Hydraulic principles pertaining to automatic transmissions. Principles 
of simple, complex, and compound planetary gear trains. Nomenclature and 
operation of transmission components. Prerequisite: 255. 

452. Advanced Diagnostic Testing and Servicing. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4132) 

Major methods of diagnostic testing, trouble shooting, proper use of 
scientific and precision tools and equipment. 

455. Auto Body Rebuilding and Finishing. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4135) 

Body construction shapes, parts, panels, and methods of restoring damaged 
parts, and finishing procedures. 

456. Auto Body Finishing. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4136) 

The method and procedure of finishing the automobile. Color matching 
and blending. 

MANUFACTURING 

271. Introduction to Industrial Technology. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly 4501) 

An introductory course to the world of modern Industrial Technology 
including a brief history of manufacturing processes and related technology. 
Occupations in Industrial Technology and educational requirements for 
entering and advancing in the field are covered. Emphasis will be placed on 
the field of electronics, manufacturing, construction and power technology. 

272. Industrial Technology Processes. Credit 2(2-0) 
An introduction to typical problems encountered in industrial technology 

operations including metal manufacturing, power technology, electronics, 
and construction. The use of the slide rule as an aid in problem solving is 
emphasized. 

275. Fundamentals of Metal Joining I. Credit 2(1-4) 
(Formerly 4505) 

The basic course of theory and practice in gas welding, brazing, soldering, 
cutting, fundamentals of electric arc welding. 

276. Fundamentals of Metal Joining II. Credit 2(1-4) 
(Formerly 4506) 

Continuation of 275 with emphasis on heliarc welding, spot welding, tig 
welding, and the latest techniques of metal joining, X-ray and testing. 

470. Metal Technology. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 3522) 

A basic course in metal work involving planning and design and general 
metals including bench and sheet metal, forging and foundry, basic machine 
tool operations and finishing processes. 

471. Metal Technology. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly 3525) 

Advanced study of machine tool operations, heat treating, inspection and 
assembly. 



244 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

472. Manufacturing Processes — Production I. Credit 4(2-4) 
Basic manufacturing techniques with machine tools and precision mea- 
suring instruments. Emphasis is placed on the basic machine tools including 
the lathe milling machine and shaper. Related technical knowledge and 
new trends in the manufacturing process are covered including numerical 
control, chemical milling, etc. 

473. Manufacturing Processes — Production II. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4522) 

Continuation of 472 with emphasis on the major machine tools used in 

industry. Prerequisite: 472. 

474. Dimensional Metrology. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 4540) 

A basic course in the history of measurement, the science of measurement 
and the language. Modern practices emphasized. 

475. Manufacturing Processes (Metallurgy) Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly 4541) 

A basic course in metallurgy consisting of a study of raw materials, 
ferrous and non-ferrous metals and their manufacture. Basic applied 
metallurgy operations. 

476. Industrial Plant Planning and Management. Credit 2(2-2) 
(Formerly 4142) 

The principles and techniques of plant layout as applied to modern in- 
dustry. Problems involved in planning new, remodeling old, and expanding 
present industrial facilities that they may better serve their intended pur- 
poses. Emphasis is on the roles of management, materials and machinery. 

570. Mechanical Design and Manufacturing Problems. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4560) 

A basic course in mechanical design procedures and problems of manu- 
facturing. Some recent advances are covered inluding critical path schedul- 
ing and machine relations. Prerequisite: 473, 475. 

571. Heating, Ventilation and Refrigeration. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4561) 

A study of principal equipment; design, load calculations for cooling and 
heating, layouts and controls employed in various types of systems. This 
course is augmented by a practical design problem. 

572. Commercial Refrigeration, Heating and Ventilation. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4562) 

A study of steam systems; hot water systems; warm air systems and 
electrical systems used in heating buildings. Load calculation for walk-in 
cooler and deep freezers and drinking water fountains. Special refrigerating 
devices and applications. 

573. Conditioned Air Systems I. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4563) 

A study of fundamentals involved in the conditioning of air for comfort. 
Sensible and latent heat transfer, states of matter and humanity. 



Division of Industrial Education and Technology 245 

574. Conditioned Air Systems II. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly 4564) 

Continuation of 573 with emphasis on controls, heat loads and special 
types of systems. 

575. Mechanics of Materials. Credit 2(0-4) 
(Formerly 4242) 

A study of physical properties of common materials of industry. Simple 
stresses, loads, yield strength, ultimate strength, and factors of safety. 
Applications are made in the areas of riveted and welded joints, pressure 
vessels, and beam design. 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

673. Advanced General Metals I. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 3573) 

A course in metalwork for teachers of industrial arts. Emphasis will 
center on art metal (including plating, finishes, etc.), advanced bench metal, 
sheet metal operations and machine shop. Specifications for equipment, 
organization of instruction sheets, special problems and materials will be 
covered as well as shop organization. Prerequisite: 471. 

674. Advanced General Metals II. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 3574) 

An advanced course in metalwork for the industrial arts teacher or other 
persons who may require more specialization in one area of metalwork. 
With the necessary prerequisites, the student may select any area of 
general metals for concentration and special study. Construction of projects, 
special assignments, etc. will be made after the area of work is selected 
and after consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: 673. 

For Graduates Only 

651. Power Industries and Technology. Credit 3(2-2) 

Significance of modern power sources in Industrial Technology. Design 
and operating principles of steam, water, hydraulic, pneumatic, internal and 
external combustion units. Nuclear, hydro-electric, gasoline, diesel, turbine 
rocket, jet, fuel cells, solar energy and other systems. Laboratory experi- 
ences involving utilization of power equipment, testing and servicing, with 
major emphasis on portable power plants. 

735. Electricity-Electronics. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 3585) 
For teachers and prospective teacher of Industrial Arts. Emphasis placed 
on selection and construction of projects useful in school shops, development 
of selected information. Selecting equipment and supplies, course organiza- 
tion and instructional materials. 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 




SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Reginald Amory, Dean 

The School of Engineering grants Engineers' Council for Professional 
Development (ECPD) accredited bachelor of science degrees in architectural, 
electrical, and mechanical engineering. The School also grants bachelor of 
science degrees in engineering mathematics and engineering physics in co- 
operation with the Departments of Mathematics and Physics. 

The curricula offerings include a five-year program in architectural engi- 
neering and four year programs in each of the other engineering disciplines. 

The programs of study are aimed toward preparing a student for engi- 
neering practice in all phases of his chosen field. The specific objectives of 
the School of Engineering are: 

1. To prepare the student for an active career in all facets of professional 
engineering. 

2. To provide a comprehensive background in all phases of the engineer- 
ing design process, namely: conception, planning, synthesis, analysis, 
design, and management. 

3. To provide a basic knowledge of the mathematical and natural sciences 
upon which the practice of professional engineering depends. 

4. To develop the judgment the engineer requires to effectively utilize, 
economically, the materials and forces of nature for the benefit of 
mankind. 

5. To encourage the student to develop an appreciation for the process 
nf rnntinninp' erhirfltinn. 



of continuing education 



6. To develop the intellectural, professional, and social characteristics of 
the student in such a manner as to enable him to become a responsible 
leader in his community. 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

The admission requirements are generally the same as those required for 
entrance as a freshman student. However, two units of algebra, one unit 
of plane geometry, and one-half unit of trigonometry are required for 
students who elect to pursue engineering curricula. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A five-year cooperative program, in which students may earn a major 
portion of their educational expenses through a work-study arrangement 
with industry, is available to students with satisfactory scholastic records. 

After satisfactory completion of at least two semesters in the freshman 
year, students in engineering, mathematics or physics may alternate 
semesters in industry with semesters at the university until their senior 
year. They then remain at the university until graduation. This arrange- 
ment enables the student to receive two years of work experience and at 
the same time earn educational expenses. 



249 



250 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

William A. Streat, Jr., Chairman 

It is the aim of the program in architectural engineering to encourage 
and develop students, who exhibit creative ability and who exhibit the 
ability to grasp and use scientific principles, for professional careers in the 
art and science of building. Strong emphasis is placed on training in the 
building sciences and on training in engineering as it applies to the design 
and construction of buildings. 

The architectural engineering program provides considerable training in 
general education which is devoted to study of social and physical sciences, 
art, English, mathematics and the humanities. Introductory courses in 
architectural engineering and a large percentage of the required general 
education courses are scheduled in the freshman and sophomore years. This 
training, during the first and second years, provides background for the 
study of basic engineering science and the study of more professional 
courses which are scheduled later in the program. Instruction within the 
department of architectural engineering is organized under four divisions. 

1. Graphics, Architectural Design and Architectural History. 

2. Environmental Control, Electrical and Mechanical Equipment of Build- 
ings. 

3. Professional Practice, Management, Materials and Methods of Con- 
struction. 

4. Structures. 

Each of these divisions has specific course requirements that are aimed 
toward the development of the architectural engineering student so that he 
will be able to take his place in society as a professional in the field of 
engineering. 

The five year program in architectural engineering leads to the bachelor 
of science degree and is fully accredited by the Engineer's Council for 
Professional Development. 



PROGRAM IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 
Freshman 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Architectural Engineering 111, 112 1 1 

t Chemistry 101 4 — 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 116, 117 5 5 

History 100 3 — 

Physics 221 — 5 

Geology 309 — 3 

17 18 



School of Engineering 



251 



Sophomore 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Architectural Engineering 321, 322 3 

Art 220, 221 2 

History 101 3 

Physics 222 5 

Mathematics 300 4 

Humanities 200 — 

Mechanical Engineering 335 — 

Mechanical Engineering 200 — 

Electives — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
2 



17 



16 



Lower Junior 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Architectural Engineering 441, 442 4 

Architectural Engineering 443, 444 3 

Architectural Engineering 445 — 

Architectural Engineering 448 — 

Architectural Engineering 449 3 

Architectural Engineering 446, 447 2 

Humanities 201 — 

Mechanical Engineering 336 4 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
3 
2 



16 



17 



Upper Junior 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Architectural Engineering 451 4 

Architectural Engineering 453 2 

Architectural Engineering 454, 455 3 

Architectural Engineering 456, 457 3 

Architectural Engineering 458 — 

Mathematics 240 ' — 

Mechanical Engineering 337 — 

Mechanical Engineering 441 — 

Electives 4 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



16 



17 



Senior 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Architectural Engineering 561, 562 4 

Architectural Engineering 563, 564 3 

Architectural Engineering 565 — 

Economics 301 3 

Mechanical Engineering 561, 443 4 

Mechanical Engineering 300 — 

Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
2 



17 



14 



252 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

NOTE: Architectural Engineering students may elect Chemistry 102 in the 
Second Semester of their freshman year, instead of Geology 309. 
The additional one semester hour credit will be used to satisfy 
elective requirements. 

Freshman 35 

Sophomore 33 

Lower Junior 33 

Upper Junior 33 

Senior 31 



165 - 



COURSES IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

Undergraduate 

111. Architectural Orientation. Credit 1(1-0) 

Lecture, Seminar Course: Orientation to the University and the depart- 
ment of architectural engineering. Presentation of selected topics, student 
participation and discussions. 

112. Architectural Seminar I. Credit 1(1-0) 

Lecture, Seminar, and Laboratory Demonstration: An analysis of archi- 
tectural engineering — preparation, opportunities and professional contribu- 
tions. Selected lectures and laboratory demonstrations are provided. Indi- 
vidual and group participation of students are encouraged. Prerequisite: 
Architectural Engineering 311 or consent of the department. 

321. Architectural Graphics I. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly A.E. 3121) 

Laboratory-lecture course. A first course for architectural engineering 
students; orientation to architecture, the use and care of drafting instru- 
ments, line and lettering techniques, orthographic and auxiliary projections, 
surface intersections and development, oblique and isometric drawing. Pre- 
requisites: Plane and Solid Geometry. (Not open to entering freshmen — 
open only to majors in architectural engineering.) 

322. Architectural Graphics II. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly A.E. 3122) 

Laboratory-lecture course. Shades and shadows, perspective drawing, 
study of the architectural plan, elevation and section, architectural pre- 
sentation studies in pencil, pen and ink and water color. Prerequisite: A.E. 
321. 

441. Architectural Design I. Credit 4(0-8) 

(Formerly A.E. 3141) 
Laboratory-lecture course. Designed to introduce the basic fundamentals 
of design, and as they are applied to architecture; influences on architecture, 
space relationships, form and visible structure. A series of problems is 
presented in the design of buildings having simple requirements. Prerequi- 
site: Architectural Engineering 322. 



School of Engineering 253 

442. Architectural Design II. Credit 4(0-8) 
(Formerly A.E. 3142) 

Laboratory-lecture course. Presenting a series of problems in space 
organization and planning with the study of composition and structure. 
Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 441. 

443. History of Architecture I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3143) 

Illustrated lecture. The early architecture and civilizations of Egypt, 
Western Asia, Greece and Italy; architectural developments by the Early 
Christian and Byzantine builders, and a beginning study of the architecture 
and civilizations of the Medieval period. Prerequisites: Architectural Engi- 
neering 322, and Humanities 200. 

444. History of Architecture II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3144) 

Illustrated lecture. The architecture and civilizations of the Medieval 
period, and the architecture and civilizations of the Renaissance and of the 
early Americas. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 443. 

445. Graphic Statics. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly A.E. 3145) 

Lectures and laboratory work. Graphical analysis of forces, truss stresses, 
moments of inertia, centroids, shears, bending moments and deflections. 
Forces on masonry structures, kerns, pressures and bending theory. Appli- 
cations to the design of simple structural elements. Prerequisite: Mechanical 
Engineering 335. 

446. Materials and Methods of Architectural Construction I. 

(Formerly A.E. 3146) Credit 2(2-0) 

Lecture. The manufacture and use of materials for wood frame and 
masonry construction. The study of construction methods and the influence 
of building codes. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 322. 

447. Materials and Methods of Architectural Construction II. 
(Formerly A.E. 3147) Credit 2(2-0) 

Lecture. The manufacture and use of materials for fire resistive construc- 
tion. The study of construction methods and the influence of building codes. 
Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 446. 

448. Building Sanitation. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3148) 

Lecture-problems course. Basic Hydrostatics and Hydrodynamics. Liquid 
flow in pipes. Building equipment and services including water supply and 
distribution, fire protection, plumbing, sanitary drainage and sewage dis- 
posal. Selection and engineering design of equipment. Prerequisite: Junior 
Classification. 

449. Electrical Equipment of Buildings. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3149) 

Lecture-problems course. Characteristics of electrical distribution systems, 
computation of electrical power requirements for buildings, theory and 
design of wiring systems and lighting systems for buildings, and the 
selection of electrical equipment for buildings. Prerequisites: Physics 222, 
Junior Classification. 



254 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

451. Architectural Design III. Credit 4(0-8) 
(Formerly A.E. 3151) 

Laboratory-lecture course presenting a series of problems for study of 
space analysis, space organization, form and function. Integration of design 
and construction methods and the organization of structural components. 
Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 442. 

452. Architectural Design IV. Credit 4(0-8) 
(Formerly A.E. 3152) 

Laboratory-lecture course presenting a series of problems in the design, 
analysis, and organization of buildings. Economic and social considerations 
are given to problems. Group planning, mass and orientation are studied 
for more complex building requirements. More detailed study and presenta- 
tion is required to emphasize the complete architectural complex. Prerequi- 
site: Architectural Engineering 451. 

453. History of Architecture III. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3153) 

Illustrated lecture. An analytical study of Modern and Contemporary 
Architecture. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 444. 

454. Reinforced Concrete Theory I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3154) 

Lecture-problems course. Reinforced concrete theory as applied to build- 
ing structures. Theory of design for beams, slabs, and columns. Allowable 
stress and ultimate strength concepts. Bending of reinforced concrete 
columns. Prerequisites: Architectural Engineering 445, Mechanical Engi- 
neering 336. 

455. Reinforced Concrete Theory II. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3155) 

Lecture-problems course. Footings and retaining walls, theory of design 
for continuous reinforced concrete beams and slabs. Prerequisite: Archi- 
tectural Engineering 454. 

456. Theory of Structures I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3156) 

Lecture-problems course. Reactions, shears and moments, truss analysis, 
influence lines and criteria for maximum moving load conditions. Introduc- 
tion to space frames. Portal and cantilaver approximate methods of analysis. 
Moment area theorems and deflections. Prerequisites: Architectural Engi- 
neering 445, Mechanical Engineering 336. 

457. Theory of Structures II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3157) 

Lecture-problems course. Elastic weights and the conjugate beam. Virtual 
work solutions, Maxwell's Law and Williot-Mohr methods of analysis. 
Analysis of statically indeterminate problems by consistent deformation, 
fixed points, Castigliano's theorems, three moment equations, slope deflec- 
tion, moment distribution, and column analogy. Introduction to the theory 
of limit design for Steel. Plastic analysis and analysis adaptable for com- 
puter solutions. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 456. 

458. Production Drawings. Credit 3(0-6) 
(Formerly A.E. 3158) 

Laboratory Course: Preparation of architectural working drawings and 
details for buildings. Prerequisites: Architectural Engineering 442, 447. 



School of Engineering 255 

561. Structures I. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly A.E. 3161) 

Lecture and Laboratory: Theory and design of structural components: 
tension members, compression members and beams. Connections — Design 
of statically determinate systems. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 
456. 

562. Structures II. Credit 4(2-4) 
(Formerly A.E. 3162) 

Lecture and Laboratory: Multistory frames: gravity and lateral loads. 
Design of building frames. Limit design. Three hinged arches. Composite 
construction. Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 561. 

563. Statically Indeterminate Structures. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3163) 

Lecture. Analysis of continuous beams and rigid frames. Approximate 
methods and special techniques: slope deflection, moment distribution, 
column analogy. Introduction to design of statically indeterminate systems. 
Prerequisite: Architectural Engineering 455, 457. 

564. Foundation and Soil Structures. Credit 3(1-4) 
(Formerly A.E. 3164) 

Lecture and Laboratory: Origin and composition of soils, soil structure. 
Flow of water through soils, capillary and osmotic phenomena. Soil be- 
havior under stress; compressibility; shear strength. Elements of mechanics 
of soil masses with application to problems of bearing capacity of founda- 
tions, earth pressure on retaining walls, and stability of slopes. Prerequisite: 
Upper Junior Classification. 

565. Professional Practice. Credit 2(2-0) 
(Formerly A.E. 3165) 

Lecture. Procedures of professional practice, registration, ethics, profes- 
sional services, contracts, bonds, liens, insurances, bidding procedures, 
supervision, and administration of construction operations, office manage- 
ment and accounting. Prerequisite: Upper Junior Classification. For majors 
in architectural engineering only. 

566. City Planning and Urban Design I. Credit 4(2-4) 
Lecture and Laboratory Course: History of city planning and urban 

design, general problems of city planning and urban design, architectural 
space composition. Theory of space composition. Regional and urban plan- 
ning; Scale of the plan for region and city. Transportation in the city; the 
City as a human unit. Greenery in the city. Location of the residential 
areas, industry, business and commerce, etc. Location criteria. Design of 
the neighborhood unit. Prerequisites: Juniors enrolled in the program of 
the Transportation Institute and Architectural Engineering majors of junor 
classification. Open to practicing design professionals. 

567. City Planning and Urban Design II. Credit 5(2-6) 
Lecture and Laboratory Course: New outlooks on the city and the city 

planning process. High-rise and flat cities, low-rise housing in the city. 
Space compositional factors. Places of public interest. Places of aesthetical 
attraction in the city. Transportation, and extension of the city. Types of 
housing such as row housing, twin housing, etc. High-rise city (high-flat 
housing), density of population, and scale of the city. Plans for high-rise 
housing, low income housing, and industralized technology in low income 
housing. Design of the city plan. Cooperation with the transportation 
engineer, economist, sociologist, etc. Prerequisites: Architectural Engineer- 
ing 566 and 442. Open to practicing design professionals. 



256 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Armand Richardson, Chairman 

Engineering is the profession in which a knowledge of the mathematical 
and natural sciences, gained by study, experience and practice, is applied 
with judgment to develop ways to utilize economically the materials and 
forces of nature for the benefit of humanity. Electrical Engineering is con- 
cerned with the conversion and encoding of energy and intelligence from 
other forms into electrical energy, with the transmission and distribution of 
energy and intelligence in electrical form, and with its reconversion and 
control for ultimate utilization. 

The programs offered by the Department of Electrical Engineering are 
carefully designed to give the basic principles of the social science and 
humanities as well as the engineering and physical sciences. Technical 
electives allow some specialization in digital systems, electronics, communi- 
cations and controls. Upon completion of the program the student should 
have: 

1. Learned the methods of critical inquiry and developed the use of the 
main tools of thought and expression in our society. 

2. Acquired an understanding of and appreciation for the arts and 
sciences of man, including an understanding of the social and physical 
environment in which he lives. 

3. Developed competence in his chosen vocation, profession, or field of 
concentration. 

4. Developed civic consciousness to the extent that he is ready to assume 
fully the responsibilities of citizenship and willing to participate in 
the solutions of local, national, and international problems. 

5. Developed the power of independent thinking, critical judgment, self- 
control, integrity, dignity, moral stability, and individual initiative. 

6. Developed understandings, attitudes, and skills essential to the main- 
tenance of health, including appreciation for a variety of wholesome 
leisure time pursuits. 

7. Acquired a sense of identity, aspiration, an achievement and a desire 
for continuing education. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Chemistry 101, 102 4 4 

fMathematics 116, 117 5 5 

Mechanical Engineering 101 2 — 

Physics 221 — 5 

Freshman Seminar 100, 101 1 1 

16 19 



tThose students entering with a deficiency in mathematics or who fail to pass the 
Mathematics Placement Examination will register in Preparatory Engineering Mathematics — 
Mathematics 110. 



School of Engineering 



257 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Electrical Engineering 324, 337 3 

Electrical Engineering 325 — 

Physics 222 5 

Mathematics 300, 500 4 

Mechanical Engineering 335 — 

History 100, 101 3 

^Elective 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 

4 
3 
3 



18 



17 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Electrical Engineering 448, 501 4 

Electrical Engineering 450, 452 3 

Mechanical Engineering 337, 361 3 

Mechanical Engineering 441 3 

Physics 406 — 

*Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
4 
3 



16 



18 



Senior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Electrical Engineering 565 4 

Electrical Engineering 570 4 

Senior Seminar 575 1 

Economics 301 3 

*Electives 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



14 



15 



14 



Total Credit Hours: 133 



♦Twenty-eight hours of electives are required and should be chosen after consultation with 
and approval of the departmental advisor. They should be distributed as follows: 

A minimum of twelve (12) hours of Humanities and Social Science Electives are 
required. Electives must be chosen from at least two departments in the areas of Art, 
English, Foreign Languages, Music, Economics, History and Political Science, Sociology, 
Psychology and Guidance. 

A minimum of eleven (11) hours of Technical Electives are required. At least seven 
of these hours must be advanced engineering. 

A minimum of five (5) hours of Free Electives are required and may be accumulated 
in any department. 



258 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

COURSES IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
Department Code— 420 

Undergraduate 

100.-101. Electrical Engineering Seminar I and II. Credit 1(1-0) 

Exploration of the engineer's role in a technological society and study of 
both the formulation and development of the engineering method. 

324. Introduction to Electrical Engineering I. Credit 3(3-0) 
Fundamental laws and theorems of linear circuit theory, analysis of 

resistive networks and first order systems. Corequisite: 225-300. 

325. Principles of Electromagnetic Waves. Credit 3(3-0) 
Electromagnetic concepts and effects, vector analysis. Corequisite; 

225-500. 

337. Electric Circuit Analysis I. Credit 4(3-3) 

Transient and steady state solutions to first and second order linear 
systems in the time and frequency domains; introduction to time varying 
and nonlinear systems. Coordinated laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: 
420-324. 

441. Basic Electrical Engineering I. Credit 4(3-3) 
Electrical engineering, fundamentals and applications for non-electrical 

engineering students. Electric and magnetic fields; network theory and 
application; direct and alternating current apparatus. Coordinated labora- 
tory work. Prerequisites: 227-222 and 225-117. 

442. Basic Electrical Engineering II. Credit 4(3-3) 
Electronic circuit theory and applications; control of electrical apparatus; 

electro-chemical processes; electronic analog and digital computer prin- 
ciples. Coordinated laboratory work. Prerequisite: 420-441. 

448. Electric Circuit Analysis II. Credit 4(3-3) 

Periodic function analysis of nth order linear systems, Fourier series 
and Laplace transform techniques, with coordinated laboratory work. Pre- 
requisite: 420-337. 

450. Electromagnetic Radiation and Microwave Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

The basic postulates of electromagnetism; the integral laws of free space; 
the differential laws in free space; static fields; time varying fields. Pre- 
requisite: 420-325. 

452. Electronics I. Credit 4(3-3) 

Electron Ballistics; thermionic, high field and photoemission as applied to 
vacuum tubes, semi-conductors, gas-filled tubes and specialized tubes. Co- 
ordinated laboratory work. Limited application of basic principles. Pre- 
requisite: 420-337. 

501. Circuit Analysis HI. Credit 3(3-0) 

Analysis of system responses to signals using convolution, Fourier 
integral, spectral, sampling, correlation, and probabilistic techniques. Pre- 
requisite : 420-448 or consent of instructor. 



School of Engineering 259 

565. Electronics II. Credit 4(3-3) 

A continuation of Electronics I. Principles of electronic circuits; rectifiers 
and filters; amplifiers; feedback and oscillatory systems. Techniques using 
semiconductors, vacuum tubes and gas filled tubes are employed. Co- 
ordinated laboratory work. Prerequisite: 420-452. 

570. Electric Machinery I. Credit 4(3-3) 
Electromechanical energy conversion principles; basic rotating machines; 

steady state and transient analysis of the ideal d-c machine, synchronous 
machine and induction machine. Coordinated laboratory work. Prerequisite: 
420-448. 

571. Electric Machinery II. Credit 4(3-3) 
Physical factors influencing performance of the realistic machine; single 

and three phase transformers; auto transformers; D-C machine charac- 
teristics and applications; synchronous and polyphase induction machine 
characteristics; fractional-horsepower a-c machines. Coordinated laboratory 
experience. Prerequisite: 420-570. 

575. Electrical Engineering Seminar II. Credit 1(1-0) 

Lectures, reports and discussion on current developments and practices 
in the design and application of electrical and electronic components and 
systems. 

Technical Electives in electrical engineering areas of concentration should 
be selected from the following Undergraduate-Graduate Courses: 

400-604 Analog Computer Applications 

400-606 Automatic Control Theory 

400-612 Communication Systems 

400-614 Communication Theory 

400-622 Electronic Engineering 

400-626 Engineering Research 

400-627 Fundamentals of Logic Systems 

400-634 Instrumentation: Theory and Applications 

400-646 Network Synthesis 

400-654 Projects in Electronic Networks and Systems 

400-674 Transmission of Signals and Power ^ 

Course descriptions for the above courses can be found in School of 
Engineering Advanced Undergraduate-Graduate Courses, Code 400 Section. 



DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Paul E. Parker, Acting Chairman 

The mechanical engineer is concerned with the design, manufacture, and 
evaluation of systems for the conversion of natural resources into useful 
energy devices. He must be prepared to develop new sources of power, 
propulsion, and transportation; be capable of meeting the challenges of the 
new problems in society due to a greater awareness of the interaction 
between technology and the environment. 

The program followed by the student in the Department seeks to develop 
him both liberally and professionally while preparing him to cope with 



260 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



the major concerns of the profession. It should prepare the student for a 
career in (1) research and development, (2) design of systems, (3) thermal 
sciences, (4) production, and (5) technical management. 

To aid in the analysis and research training, the Department encourages 
the use of the University Computer Science Center where programs are 
processed on a Control Data Corporation Model 3300 computer system. 
Programming techniques in Fortran are introduced during engineering 
orientation and in Engineering Analysis. Thereafter, continued use of 
electronic digital systems become a part of the training process. 

Experimental training is practiced in specialized laboratories in instru- 
mentation and fluid flow, fuels and thermal systems, metallurgy, materials 
testing, and vibration characteristics. 

Additional research experience and experimental techniques are available 
through the faculty research and student electives as over fifty percent of 
the faculty are engaged in active research projects. 

Students interested in earning while they learn the practical aspects of 
engineering, may elect to participate in the Co-operative Education Program 
within the Department. Information on the program and other details may 
be secured by writing to the Department. 



COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 
Mechanical Engineering Depr. 

(Based on two students — "A" and "B") 



Fall Semester 



First Year 

Credit Spring Semester 



English 100 4 

History 100 3 

Math 116 5 

M.E. 101 2 

Electives 2 

16 



Credit Summer Semester 



English 101 4 

History 101 3 

Math 117 5 

Chemistry 101 4 

Coop Seminar 

16 



"A" 
("B" working) 
Physics 221 
M.E. 200 .... 



Credit 



Fall Semester 

"B" 

("A" working) 

Physics 221 

M.E. 200 

Humanities 200 
Math 300 
Economics 301 . 



Second Year 

Credit Spring Semester Credit Summer Semester 



"A" 
("B" working) 
5 Humanities 200 .3 

3 Physics 222 5 

3 Math 300 4 

4 M.E. 335 3 

3 Electives 3 



"B" 

("A" working) 
Physics 222 . 
M.E. 335 .... 



Credit 



18 



18 



School of Engineering 



261 



Fall Semester Credit 

"A" 
("B" working) 

M.E. 226 3 

M.E. 336 4 

M.E. 337- 3 

M.E. 361 3 

E.E. 441 4 



Third Year 

Spring Semester Credit 

"B" 

("A" working) 

Humanities 201 3 

M.E. 336 4 

M.E. 337 3 

M.E. 440 3 

M.E. 443 3 

Electives 3 



Summer Semester Credit 

"A" 
("B" working) 

M.E. 441 3 

Economics 301 3 

Electives 3 



17 



19 



Fall Semester Credit 

"B" 

("A" working) 

M.E. 226 3 

M.E. 361 3 

M.E. 441 3 

E.E. 441 4 



Fourth Year 

Spring Semester Credit 

"A" 
("B" working) 

M.E. 440 3 

M.E. 442 4 

M.E. 443 3 

E.E. 442 4 



Summer Semester Credit 

"B" 

("A" working) 

M.E. 442 4 

Elective 3 



Electives 3 Humanities 201 



16 



17 



Fall Semester 



Fifth Year "A" 

Credit Spring Semester 



M.E. 560 3 

M.E. 564 3 

M.E. 566 4 

Electives 6 



M.E. 339 

M.E. 562 

M.E. 565 

M.E. 568 

Electives 4 



Credit 

. . . 2 

...4 

...3 

.3 



16 



16 



Fall Semester 



Fifth Year "B" 

Credit Spring Semester 



M.E. 560 3 

M.E. 564 3 

M.E. 566 4 

Electives 7 



M.E. 
M.E. 
M.E. 
M.E. 
E.E. 



339 
562 

565 
568 
442 



Credit 

. . . 2 

. . . 4 

3 

.3 

. . . 4 



17 



16 



Total Credit Hours— 133. 

NOTE: If Humanities are offered during the summer, M.E. 200 can be 
shifted or/and electives may be shifted from the summer listing. 

The number of summer hours are limited because of the present Uni- 
versity ruling of 10 hours maximum. 



262 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



PROGRAM FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING MAJORS 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English^), 101 4 

History 100, 101 3 

*Mathematics 116, 117 5 

Mechanical Engineering 101 2 

Chemistry 101 — 

**Electives 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 

5 



16 



16 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Humanities 200, 201 3 3 

Physics 221, 222 5 5 

Mechanical Engineering 200, 361 3 3 

Mechanical Engineering 335 — 3 

Mathematics 300 — 4 

Economics 301 3 — 

**Electives 4 — 



18 
Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Mechanical Engineering 226 3 

Mechanical Engineering 386, 440 4 

Mechanical Engineering 337, 442 3 

Mechanical Engineering 441, 443 3 

Electrical Engineering 441, 442 4 

**Electives — 



18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



17 



17 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Mechanical Engineering 339 — 2 

Mechanical Engineering 560, 562 3 4 

Mechanical Engineering 564, 565 3 3 

Mechanical Engineering 566, 568 4 3 

**Electives 6 3 



Total Credit Hours: 133 



16 



15 



♦Students entering with a deficiency in mathematics or score low on the Mathematics 
Placement Examination must begin with Prep-Engineering Mathematics and the above 
mathematics sequence would be shifted one semester. 

**At least six (6) credit hours of electives must be taken from the Humanities-Social 
Science Group and at least six (6) credit hours from the Technical Group; six (6) credit 
hours are free electives. 



School of Engineering 263 

COURSES IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
Department Code — 440 

Undergraduate 

101. Engineering Graphics I. Credit 2(0-6) 
(Formerly M.E. 3701) 

Instrument practice; lettering; geometrical construction; projections; 
sections auxiliary projection; revolution; pictorial drawing; intersection and 
development. Drawing of fasteners, springs and gears; detail and assembly 
drawings; tracing and reproduction methods. 

102. Engineering Graphics II. Credit 2(0-6) 
(Formerly M.E. 3702) 

Representation of common geometrical magnitudes with points, lines, 
planes, and solids; concurrent noncoplanar forces; the solution of problems; 
advanced intersection and development. Prerequisite: M.E. 101. 

200. Engineering Analysis. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly M.E. 3720) 
The introduction of technical writing, applications of mathematics and 
science in engineering problems, and the tools of engineering; the electronic 
analog computer, eletronic digital computer and the slide rule are presented 
as tools for solving matrix problems and other related problems. Pre- 
requisite: Math. 112 or 116. 

226. Manufacturing Processes. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly M.E. 3726) 
Fabricating methods by machining, forming, casting, welding and ad- 
hesive bonding; measuring and gaging; automation; numerical control of 
machine tools; economics of metal manufacture; plastics. 

300. Plane Surveying. Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly M.E. 3730) 
The methods of using the compass, transit, tape and level in making 
plane surveys. Lectures and field work. Elementary stadia work. Pre- 
requisite: Trigonometry or Math. 110. 

335. Mechanics I, Statics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly M.E. 3735) 

Analytical and graphic techniques for determining force systems acting 
in frames and trusses under static load; equilibrium, distributed forces, 
centroids, friction, moment in interia. Prerequisites: Physics 221, Math. 117. 

336. Strength of Materials. Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly M.E. 3736) 

Shear and bending moment diagrams, stresses in beams, shafts, and 
columns; combined stresses, deflection in beams, fiber stresses and their 
distribution; tension, compression, shear and torsion. Experimental work 
on the mechanics of materials. Prerequisite: M.E. 335. 

337. Mechanics II, Dynamics. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly M.E. 3737) 

Dynamics and kinetics, rectilinear and curvilinear motion, relative 
velocity and acceleration, work and energy, impact, moment of momentum. 
Prerequisite: M.E. 335. 



264 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

339. Engineering Practice. Credit 2(2-0) 

(Formerly M.E. 3739) 
Communication, law, human relations and professional development in the 
practice of engineering. Development and use of communication tools, pro- 
fessional understanding and contract documents. Prerequisite: Eng. 101. 

361. Fluid Mechanics. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly M.E. 3761) 
Principles of static and dynamic behavior of incompressible fluids with 
some applications to fluid machinery. Experimental work in fluid mechanics 
and instrumentation. Prerequisite: Math. 117 or equivalent. 

440. Kinematics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly M.E. 3740) 

A condensed course covering relative motions, velocities and accelerations 
of machine parts including linkages, cams and geams. Prerequisites: M.E. 
101, Math. 113 or 116. 

441. Thermodynamics I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly M.E. 3741) 

A course in Engineering Thermodynamics on a microscopic system basis. 
Energy conversion in processes with ideal and real gases as they are studied 
and governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Prerequisites: 
Physics 221, Math. 117. 

442. Thermodynamics II. Credit 4(3-3) 
(Formerly M.E. 3742) 

A continuation of Thermodynamics I including first and second law 
applications to power, heating, and refrigeration cycles. The subjects of 
gas mixtures, psychrometrics and heat transfer are introduced. Experi- 
mental work in thermal sciences. Prerequisite: M.E. 441. 

443. Production Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly M.E. 3743) 

Problems relating to the engineer's role as consultant on matters of 
investment and operations, cost concepts, profit-volume relationships and 
analysis, treatment of make or buy decisions, renewal or replacement 
decisions, minimum cost problems, simple linear programming models. 
Prerequisite: Economics 301. 

444. Undergraduate Projects. Credit 1-3 
Study arranged on engineering topics of interest to student. A faculty 

member will serve as project advisor. Topics may include analytical and/or 
experimental work and encourages independent study. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Department and agreement of faculty member as advisor. 

450. Introduction to Nuclear Engineering. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly M.E. 3750) 
A survey of the engineering applications of nuclear energy. The prin- 
ciples and practices of isotope separation, production of plutonium, and 
nuclear reactor operations are studied along with the peace-time uses of 
products and by-products of nuclear reactors. Major engineering problems 
involved in each phase of the study are defined and the special methods of 
approach indicated. Prerequisite: Physics 222. 



School of Engineering 265 

560. Metallurgy. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly 3760) 

Principles of physical metallurgy; physical properties of metal and alloys; 
alloying and equilibrium diagrams; ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy; 
corrosion and deformation of metals; principles of heat treatment processes; 
experiments on pyrometry, metallography, heat treatment and thermal equi- 
librium diagrams. Prerequisites: M.E. 226, Chemistry 101. 

561. Environmental Control. Credit 4(3-3) 
(Formerly M.E. 3767) 

Principles of heating and air conditioning and their applications to design 
of environmental control systems; determination of building heating and 
cooling loads; principal equipment, layout and controls are discussed for 
various types of systems. Prerequisite: M.E. 441. 

562. Heat and Mass Transfer. Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly M.E. 3762) 

Relation of heat transfer to thermodynamics; conduction of heat in 
steady and unsteady states; electrical network analogy, heat transfer by 
radiation, free and forced connection; heat exchangers; mass diffusion. Ex- 
perimental work in heat transfer. Prerequisites: M.E. 361 and M.E. 441. 

564. Machine Design I. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly M.E. 3764) 

Synthesis of mechanical systems and devices. Specification of systems; 
region of design; synthesis of elements in the complete analysis of the as- 
sembly. Project work. Prerequisites: M.E. 336, and 440. 

565. Machine Design II. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly M.E. 3765) 

Continuation of Mechanical Engineering 564. 

566. Mechanical Vibrations. Credit 4(3-2) 
(Formerly M.E. 3766) 

An introduction to the dynamics of systems with and without external 
damping, stability, lumped, and distributed. Vibration isolation mounts and 
control systems are analyzed with classical differential equations, electro- 
mechanical analogies and computer methods. Prerequisites: M.E. 336 and 
M.E. 337. 

568. Gas Dynamics. Credit 3(2-2) 

(Formerly 3768) 
Thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of one dimensional compressible 
fluid flow. Aerodynamics, isotropic nozzle flow with normal shocks; flow 
with friction; heating and cooling. Also introduction to two dimensional 
flow. Experimental work in fluid flow. Prerequisites: M.E. 361, M.E. 441. 

572. Mechanical Engineering Seminar I. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly M.E. 3772) 

Reports and discussions on special topics in mechanical engineering and 
related fields. Prerequisite: Senior standing in mechanical engineering. 

573. Mechanical Engineering Seminar II. Credit 1(0-2) 
(Formerly M.E. 3773) 

Continuation of Mechanical Engineering 572. Prerequisite: Senior stand- 
ing in Mechanical Engineering. 



266 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

COURSES IN ENGINEERING 
Department Code — 400 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

Course Number 

602. Advanced Strength of Materials. 

603. Advanced Thermodynamics. 

604. Analog Computer Applications. 
606. Automatic Control Theory. 
612. Communication Systems. 

614. Communication Theory. 
622. Electronic Engineering. 
624. Elementary Nuclear Reactor Theory. 



Credit 

3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(2-3) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
3(3-0) 
4(3-3) 
3(3-0) 



626. Engineering Research. Variable 

627. Fundamentals of Logic Systems. 3(3-0) 

632. Information Theory. 3(3-0) 

634. Instrumentation-Theory and Applications. 3(3-0) 

642. Management, Organization and Industrial Economics. 3(3-0) 

644. Matrix Analysis of Structures. 3(2-2) 

646. Network Synthesis. 3(3-0) 

648. Numerical Analysis for Engineers. 3(3-0) 

650. Operations Research. 3(3-0) 

652. Plates and Shells. 4(2-4) 

654. Projects in Electronic Networks and Systems. 3(1-6) 

655. Professional Development I. 1-3 Variable 

656. Professional Development II. 1-3 Variable 
660. Selected Topics in Engineering. 3(3-0) 
666. Special Projects. 1-3 Variable 
670. Semiconductor Theory. 3(3-0) 
672. Theory of Elasticity. 3(3-0) 
674. Transmission of Signals and Power. 3(3-0) 



School of Engineering 267 

Graduate 

700. Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design. 3(2-2) 

701. Advanced Structural Analysis. 3(3-0) 

702. Applied Numerical Methods. 3(3-0) 
710. Boundry Layer Theory. 3(3-0) 
715. Continuum Mechanics. 3(3-0) 
722. Electromagnetic Wave Theory. 3(3-0) 
724. Electronic Systems Analysis. 3(3-0) 
742. Mechanical Properties and Theories of Failure. 3(3-0) 
744. Network Matrices and Graphs. 3(3-0) 
722. Theory and Design of Digital Systems. 3(3-0) 
728. Experimental Stress Analysis. 3(2-2) 

735. Heat Transfer I— Conduction 3(3-0) 

736. Heat Transfer II— Radiation. 3(3-0) 
738. Irreversible Thermodynamics. 3(3-0) 

Advanced Undergraduate and Graduate 

602. Advanced Strength of Materials. Credit 3(3-0) 
Stress-strain in relations as applied to statically indeterminate structures, 

bending in curved bars, plates, shells, and beams on elastic foundations; 
strain energy concepts for formulation of flexibility matrix on finite ele- 
ments; bending in beams and plates; introduction to cartesian tensor nota- 
tion and matrix structural analysis. Prerequisite: 440-336 or equivalent. 

603. Advanced Thermodynamics. Credit 3(3-0) 
Statistical mechanics and microscopic properties from statistical methods. 

Equilibrium, information, generalized coordinates, and general variables. 
Prerequisite : 440-442 or equivalent. 

604. Analog Computer Applications. Credit 3(2-3) 
The course consists of an introduction to the analog computer; methods 

of programming for the solution of linear and non-linear differential equa- 
tions, dynamic response of physical systems and simulation of physical 
systems and phenomena. Prerequisite: 225-300 or consent of instructor. 

606. Automatic Control Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

The automatic control problem; review of operational calculus; state and 

transient solutions of feedback control systems; types of servomechanisms 

and control systems; design principles. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

612. Communication Systems. Credit 3(3-0) 

This course covers the factors affecting the performance of communica- 
tion systems, such as intermodulation noise, thermal noise, bandwidth, and 
the design of pulse modulation systems including delta and pulse code. 
Communication systems using earth satellites are covered in great detail 
including space communication. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



268 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

614. Communication Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

A course covering fundamental principles of modulation theory which 
are commonly used in the design of communication systems; linear modula- 
tion systems — amplitude, double and single sideband, and vestigial side- 
band modulation; and non-linear modulation system frequency and phase. 
Prerequisite: 225-500 and 420-452 or consent of instructor. 

622. Electronic Engineering. Credit 4(3-3) 

A study of various types of electronic circuits used in engineering 
practice-wave shaping and computing circuits, photosensitive devices and 
circuits; control and switching circuits; modulation and demodulation cir- 
cuits. Co-ordinated laboratory work with industrial applications and special 
projects. Prerequisite: 420-565 or equivalent. 

624. Elementary Nuclear Reactor Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

A lecture course in the principles of chain reactors, slowing down of 
neutrons, neutron diffusion equations, space distribution of neutrons, con- 
ditions for criticality, reactor dimensions for simple geometries, elementary 
group theories, and time dependent reactor behavior. Prerequisites: 225-300 
and 450-450 or consent of instructor. 

626. Engineering Research. Credit Variable 
Special investigation adapted to the special abilities of individual stu- 
dents. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

627. Fundamentals of Logic Systems. Credit 3(3-0) 
Introduction to digital information handling concepts of counting, trans- 
fer, sequence control, selection, addressing and digital system control. 
Corequisite: 420-452 or consent of instructor. 

632. Information Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

Probability theory and its application in the analysis of information 
transfer. Special attention is given to information in communications, 
random signals, noise processes, microscopic processes and macroscopic 
events. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

634. Instrumentation-Theory and Applications. Credit 3(3-0) 

Consideration is given to applications of software and hardware tech- 
niques of instrumentation. Attention is given to treatment of data, errors 
in measurements and instruments, capabilities and limitations of instru- 
ments as to precision and accuracy. Commercial instruments, transducers 
and their specifications will be used as models to illustrate basic principles 
involved. Students will be encouraged to design instrumentation for mea- 
surements of both electrical and non-electrical quantities in systems, sub- 
systems and processes. Prerequisite: 420-452 or consent of instructor. 

642. Management, Organization and Industrial Economics. Credit 3(3-0) 
Manufacturing management; systems design, organization and planning, 
plant location, design of processes, industrial equipment, work measure- 
ment, materials handling, plant layout. Manufacturing control: inventory 
management, purchasing production planning and control, quality control, 
maintenance engineering, cost control. Manufacturing relationships: per- 
sonnel management, labor relations, wage and salary administration, job 



School of Engineering 269 

evaluation, research and development, financial management, marketing 
management. Industrial economy: concepts in economy analysis, selections, 
interest formulas, depreciation, pattern for analysis. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. 

644. Matrix Analysis of Structures. Credit 3(2-2) 

Lecture and Laboratory. Review of matrix algebra; statically and kine- 
matically, indeterminate structures; introduction to flexibility and stiffness 
methods; applications to beams, plane trusses and plane frames. Pre- 
requisites: 410-457 or consent of instructor. 

646. Network Synthesis. Credit 3(3-0) 

Use of positive real functions and linear graphs in the synthesis of 
passive networks. Investigation of the properties of the driving point and 
transfer functions of passive networks and the synthesis of one and two 
port networks using positive real functions. Linear graphs and topological 
aspects are introduced. Prerequisite: 420-448 or consent of instructor. 

648. Numerical Analysis for Engineers. Credit 3(3-0) 

Scientific programming, error analysis, matrix algebra, eigenvalue prob- 
lems, curve fitting approximations, interpolation, numerical differentiation 
and integration, solutions to simultaneous equations, and numerical solu- 
tions of differential equations. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

650. Operations Research. Credit 3(3-0) 

Management decision making, queuing theory, probability and sequences, 

formulation of mathematical models of processes with orientation to 

optimizing by use of digital computers. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

652. Plates and Shells. Credit 4(2-4) 

Lecture and Laboratory. Introduction to plane plate theory; membrance 
stresses in shells with axial symmetry; cylindrical shells; applications in 
the design of shell roofs, tanks, pipelines and pressure vessels. Prerequisite: 
410-455 or consent of instructor. 

654. Projects in Electronic Networks and Systems. Credit 3(1-6) 
Special topics and laboratory work of special interest to the students in 

electronic networks and communications circuits; most of the work is given 
by the project method and emphasizes actual circuit construction. Pre- 
requisite: 420-452 or consent of instructor. 

655. Professional Development I. Credit Variable 1-3 
Directed self-study by the student in exploring an area both of special 

interest to the student and of mutual interest to Architectural engineering 
faculty member(s). 

656. Professional Development II. Credit Variable 1-3 
Continuation of 400-655. 

660. Selected Topics in Engineering. Credit 3(3-0) 

Selected engineering topics of interest to students and faculty. The topics 

will be selected before the beginning of the course and will be pertinent 

to the programs of the students enrolled. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



270 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

666. Special Projects. Credit Variable 1-3 

Study arranged on a special engineering topic of interest to student and 
faculty member, who will act as advisor. Topics may be analytical and/or 
experimental and encourage independent study. Prerequisite: consent of 
instructor. 

672. Theory of Elasticity. Credit 3(3-0) 

Introduction; stress, strain; stress-strain relations; energy principles; 
special topics. Prerequisites: 440-336 and 225-300 or consent of instructor. 

674. Transmission of Signals and Power. Credit 3(3-0) 

Generalized transmission circuits; transmission line parameters; long 
distance steady state transmission; transients in transmission lines; signal 
transmission lines; high frequency lines. Prerequisites: 420-448 and 225-300 
or consent of instructor. 

670. Semiconductor Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

An examination of the phenomena of solid-state conduction and devices 
using band modeling. Prerequisite: 420-565 or equivalent. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Naomi W. Wynn, Dean 

The School of Nursing offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing. It includes the University Core Requirements in the 
physical, biological and social sciences; the humanities and courses in 
Nursing. The first two years are primarily general academic. The last two 
years are largely devoted to the Nursing Major. 

PHILOSOPHY 

The faculty of the School of Nursing ascribes to the following beliefs 
and assumptions: 

Man is a biological organism affected, influenced and changed by heredity, 
environment and experiences. Man is unique being with certain basic needs: 
that all human beings have the same basic needs as well as individual 
needs. However, there are variations in intensity, strength and resources 
which may be due to a heritage characterized by deprivation and an ex- 
istence characterized by oppression. In this light, the black man is a 
modular representative. Therefore, passionate sensitivity to the needs of 
man and his strives to rise above the limitations of his human condition is 
essential. As a human being man is always in the process of becoming, 
evolving or changing, and our participation in this process is through 
education. 

Education is a continuous process which provides opportunities for the 
development of the person to his maximum capacity for functioning in a 
dynamic society. Learning is a continuous process, a modification of be- 
havior through interaction with the environment. We recognize the need 
of the learner to have an understanding of his role in the educational 
process and we assume responsibility for the planning, interpretation, 
implementation and guidance of the educational program. 

Nursing involves care, cure, and coordination of the health-illness con- 
tinuum, executed through the Nursing Process — assessment, planning, inter- 
vention, and evaluation. Care is the primary component, cure and coordi- 
nation are secondary. 

CURRICULUM 

PROGRAM FOR NURSING MAJORS 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Freshman Mathematics 101 & 102 3 3 

Freshman Composition 100 & 101 4 4 

General Chemistry 105 & 106 4 4 

General Zoology 160 4 — 

General Microbiology 121 — 4 

Orientation 1 — 

Person Hygiene or Physical Education (2)1 1 

17 16 

273 



274 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester Summer 
Course and Number Credit Credit 

History of Western Civilization 100, 101 . 3 3 — 

Humanities I & II 200, 201 3 3 — 

General Psychology 320 3 — — 

Principles of Sociology 204 — 3 — 

Nutrition & Dietetics 337 3 — — 

Human Anatomy 469 — 3 — 

Human Physiology 560 3 — — 

Nursing I & II, 220 & 221 2 4 — 

Medical Surgical Nursing I, 222 — — 6 

17 16 6 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester Summer 
Course and Number Credit Credit 

*Maternal Child Health Nursing 440 8 — — 

*Medical Surgical Nursing II 441 — 8 — 

Mental Hygiene 437 — 3 — 

*Community Organization 521 3 — — 

*Voice & Speech Fundamentals 250 — 2 — 

Principles of Family Health 442 3 — — 

Electives 3 3 — 

Psychiatric Nursing 444 — — 6 

17 16 6 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

*Medical Surgical Nursing III, 561 — 8 

*Public Health Nursing 560 8 — 

Trends & Issues in Nursing 565 — 2 

Fundamentals of Research in Nursing 562 2 — 

Nursing Seminar I & II, 563 & 564 1 1 

Electives 3 3 

14 14 

NOTE: The lower division requirements or first two years of the curric- 
ulum largely offered by the school of Arts and Science, the School of 
Education, and the first three courses in Nursing must be completed prior 
to registration in any upper division Nursing Courses. 

Twelve semester hours of electives are required. Six semester hours of 
electives must be chosen from the Departments of Education, Sociology 
and Social Welfare, or Psychology and Guidance. 



'Courses offered each Semester. 



School of Nursing 275 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

220. Historical Survey of Nursing. Credit 2(2-0) 
A study of Nursing past and present. Focuses on understanding the 

major social forces which influenced the development of nursing and nursing 
in the present social setting. 

221. Fundamentals of Nursing. Credit 4(3-4) 
Presents the global concepts basic to nursing activities. Emphasis is on 

the nursing process: assessment, planning intervention, and evaluation in 
relation to meeting man's basic physiologic-psychosocial needs. 

222. Medical-Surgical Nursing I. Credit 6(3-12) 
Provides experiences to extend the basic concept of the nursing process 

in selected medical-surgical health problems. Emphasis is on assessment, 
priority planning, intervention and evaluation. Includes principles of nutri- 
tion, pharmacology and other disciplines as they relate to selected medical- 
surgical problems. Prerequisite: Nursing 221. 

440. Maternal Child Health Nursing. Credit 8(4-16) 
The study of basic concepts of Maternal and Child Health. Focuses on 

the nursing needs of mothers and children with emphasis on Health and 
Illness, Childbearing, Childbearing and Hospitalization as they relate to 
the individual in the family constellation. Prerequisites: Nursing 221 & 222. 

441. Medical Surgical Nursing II. Credit 8(4-16) 
A continuation of the Medical-Surgical series. Focuses on the inter- 
dependent Nursing functions with emphasis on prevention of illness, and 
Nursing Interventions during illness and rehabilitation. Prerequisites: 
Nursing 221 & 222. 

442. Principles of Family Health. Credit 3(2-2) 
The study of approaches to the appraisal and continuous surveillance of 

the human organism throughout the maturation process. Emphasis is placed 
on the role of the nurse as a participant-observer of the maturation process, 
encompassing general problems of nursing and social situations. Prerequi- 
sites: Nursing 221 & 222. 

444. Psychiatric Nursing. Credit 6(3-12) 

The study of psychosocial concepts as they relate to nursing situations 
involving the emotionally disturbed. Emphasis is placed on communication 
and use of the self as a basic tool in instituting nursing care. Prerequisites: 
Nursing 221, 222, 440, 441, and 442. 

560. Public Health Nursing. Credit 8(4-16) 
The study of the community Health-illness problems. Provides opportunity 

to apply, extend, and deepen the components of Public Health through the 
correlation of theory and practice of nursing in an organized community 
setting. Guided related clinical experiences in conjunction with lectures, 
conferences and seminars. Prerequisites: Completion of all junior Nursing 
Courses. 

561. Medical Surgical Nursing III. Credit 8(4-16) 
A continuation of the Medical Surgical series. Includes dimensions of 

independent nursing functions, comprehensive nursing, and leadership skills. 
Prerequisites: Completion of all junior Nursing Courses. 



276 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

562. Introduction to Research in Nursing. Credit 2(2-0) 
A survey of the research process to develop some ability in understand- 
ing, examining, and utilizing research findings in nursing. Prerequisites: 
Completion of all junior Nursing Courses. 

563. Nursing Seminar I. Credit 1(0-2) 
Provides opportunity for discussion and independent study of major social 

health problems with emphasis on the role of the nurse. Prerequisites: 
Completion of all junior Nursing Courses. 

564. Nursing Seminar II. Credit 1(0-2) 
A continuation of Nursing 563. 

565. Trends and Issues in Nursing. Credit 2(2-0) 
Focuses on current trends and issues in nursing. Includes an exploration 

of the nature of nursing in today's society. 



SCHOOL OF ADMINISTRATIVE 

AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 




SCHOOL OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND 
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 

T. Mahaffey, Dean 

PURPOSE 

The purpose of the School of Administrative and Management Science is 
to develop business leaders who are capable of coping with new tech- 
nologies and social progress. The scope of the School's programs includes 
curricula based primarily upon key concepts and skills necessary for 
decision-making and problem-solving roles in government, business, edu- 
cation, and industry. The School of Administrative and Management Science 
also serves to perpetuate general understanding and appreciation for the 
interrelationships of the national as well as world socio-economic environ- 
ments. 

The programs within the School of Administrative and Management 
Science are divided into three parts, viz., general education, business and 
economics core, and selected areas of specialization (accounting, business 
administration, business education, or office administration). Approximately 
forty per cent consists of courses designed to give a broad foundation in 
general education. Another forty per cent consists of courses designed to 
give the student a comprehensive background in basic areas of business and 
economics. Approximately twenty per cent is designed for specialization. 

Admission Requirements of the 
School of Administrative and Management Science 

Graduates of standard high schools, and other students who are able to 
satisfy the entrance requirements of the University, may be admitted to 
the School of Administrative and Management Science. 

Degrees Offered 

The School of Administrative and Management Science offers the 
Bachelor of Science degree in the following areas: Accounting, Business 
Administration, Business Education, and Office Administration. 

Degree Requirements 

The individual student is held responsible for the election of his courses 
in conformity with the curriculum of his choice. 

A student is required to graduate under the curriculum of his choice as 
announced in the catalogue current when he enters the School of Admini- 
strative and Management Science as a resident student. A student is also 
subject to subsequent regulations published while he is a student. 

A student who enters the School of Administrative and Management 
Science has the privilege of graduating under the provisions of the 
catalogue under which he enters the University provided he completes his 
course within six years. After the interval of six years he is expected to 
conform to the catalogue requirements specified for the class with which 
he is graduated. 

279 



280 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

All candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must take the Under- 
graduate Record Examination, the Admission Test for Graduate Study in 
Business and /or the National Teachers Examination as a requirement of 
graduation. 

The applicant for graduation must have earned a minimum of 124 
semester hours excluding deficiency courses and remedial work with a 
cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better on all courses undertaken 
and attain a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better in his major 
field of study. 

Proficiency Examinations 

Students who have had some training or experience in certain fields 
offered in the School of Administrative and Management Science will be 
given an opportunity to take an examination in such fields with the per- 
mission of the Chairman of the Department and the approval of the Dean 
of the School of Administrative and Management Science. A student who 
passes a proficiency examination is given credit toward graduation, pro- 
vided that the course is acceptable in his curriculum. Credit is given only 
if a grade of "C" is made on the examination. "S" is the grade recorded 
on the student's record. No official record is made of failures in these 
examinations. 

Proficiency examinations are given under the following restrictions: 

1. They may be taken only by persons who are in residence in the 
University. 

2. They may not be taken to raise grades or remove failures in courses. 

3. They may be taken only once in the same course. 



DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING 

Herbert N. Watkins, Chairman 

ACCOUNTING CURRICULUM 

Successful practice of accounting today requires both technical com- 
petence in accounting and a thorough understanding of the economic en- 
vironment in which accounting operates. Only by understanding the ob- 
jectives and constraints of the economic environment is the accountant able 
to apply his technical competence toward the solution of business problems. 

The accounting curriculum attempts to meet this two-fold need by re- 
quiring broad exposure to the related business disciplines as well as rigorous 
training in the methodology and underlying theory of the specialized fields 
of accounting. Successful completion of the degree requirements will prepare 
a student for graduate study as well as accounting positions in business 
and government. Special attention is given to preparation for the C.P.A. 
examination. 



Division of Business Administration 



281 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 

Biology 100, Physical Science 100 or 

Botany 740, Zoology 160 4 

Business Administration 304 — 

Education 100 1 

Social Science 100, 101 3 

16 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Accounting 221, 222 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Psychology 320 3 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Physical Education 1 

Health Education 200 — 

Business Administration 305 — 

English 250 2 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
4 



4 
3 

3 

18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 



16 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Business Administration 451, 452 3 

Mathematics 224 3 

Business Administration 449 — 

Business Administration 440 3 

Business Administration 572 — 

Accounting 441 3 

Accounting 443 — 

Accounting 444 — 

Accounting 445 — 

Accounting 446 3 



16 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 
Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Accounting 545 3 

Accounting 562 3 

Accounting 561 — 

Accounting 590 — 

Business Administration 578 3 

Business Administration 571 — 

Business Administration 459 — 

Business Administration 450 3 

Business Administration 454 3 

Electives — 

15 



18 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



3 
15 



282 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Major Program Requirements: 



Semester 
Hours 



Acct. 441 — Intermediate Accounting 3 

Acct. 443 — Income Tax Accounting 3 

Acct. 444 — Cost Accounting 3 

Acct. 445 — Advanced Accounting I 3 

Acct. 545 — Advanced Accounting II 3 

Acct. 561 — Auditing Principles 3 

Acct. 562 — Accounting Systems 3 

Acct. 590 — Seminar in Accounting Theory 3 

B.A. 449 — Advanced Business Statistics 3 

B.A. 572 — Electronic Data Processing for Business 3 

30 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Albert D. Smart, Chairman 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in business administration (general business) is structured 
to provide a thorough background in the whole spectrum of the business 
sphere as opposed to a major in one of the several subfields such as account- 
ing, finance, management, and marketing. The principal objectives of the 
program are (1) to provide majors with the necessary background to 
pursue a course of study in a graduate school of business administration 
and (2) to prepare majors for immediate employment after graduation. 
Graduates of the program who elect immediate employment either become 
proprietors or join business concerns and government agencies as employees 
or management trainees. 

Freshman Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

English 100, 101 4 4 

Mathematics 111, 112 4 4 

Biology 100, Physical Science or 

Botany 240, Zoology 160 4 4 

Social Science 100, 101 3 3 

Education 100 1 — 

Physical Education — 1 

16 16 



Division of Business Administration 



283 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Accounting 221, 222 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Business Education 301 2 

Psychology 320 3 

Business Education 334 — 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Physical Education 1 

Health Education 200 — 

Business Administration 304 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 



16 

Junior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Business Administration 305 3 

Business Administration 440 3 

Business Administration 449 — 

Business Administration 450 — 

Business Administration 451, 452 3 

Business Administration 459 — 

Accounting 446 3 

Mathematics 224 3 

Speech 250 — 

15 
Senior Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Business Administration 454 3 

Business Administration 569 3 

Business Administration 570 — 

Business Administration 572 — 

Business Administration 578 3 

*Electives (business) 3 

Electives (non-business) 3 



17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



2 

14 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



15 15 

Major Program Requirements: 

Semester 
Hours 

B.A. 440 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B.A. 449 — Advanced Business Statistics 3 

B.A. 451, 452 — Principles of Business Law 6 

B.A. 454 — Principles of Insurance 3 

B.A. 459 — Money, Credit and Banking 3 

B.A. 569 — Personnel Organization and Management 3 

B.A. 570— Principles of Retailing 3 

B.A. 572 — Electronic Data Processing for Business 3 

B.A. 578 — Business Finance 3 



30 



284 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



* Business Electives 

Credit 

Bus. Adm. 457 — Principles of Real Estate 3 

Bus. Adm. 458 — Principles of Advertising 3 

Bus. Adm. 564 — Seminar in Management 3 

Bus. Adm. 565 — Principles of Salesmanship 3 

Bus. Adm. 571 — Principles of Investments 3 

Bus. Adm. 575 — Business Administration Internship 3 

Bus. Educ. 302— Typewriting II 2 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Florentine V. Goodlett Sowell, Chairman 

COMPREHENSIVE BUSINESS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The comprehensive business aducation curriculum is designed to develop 
students to teach both skill and basic business subjects at the secondary 
school level. The curriculum meets the certification requirements for the 
State of North Carolina. Nevertheless, each student must make the mini- 
mum score on the National Teachers Examination as required by the State 
of North Carolina to qualify for a Class A North Carolina teaching 
certificate. 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

*Biology 100, Physical Science 100, 

Botany 140, Zoology 160 4 

*( Select any two) 

Business Administration 304 — 

Business Education 301, 302 2 

Education 100 1 

History 100, 101 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 

3 



17 



19 



Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Accounting 221, 222 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Business Education 331, 332 3 

English 250 — 

Business Education 334 2 

Psychology 320 — 

Education 300, 301 2 

Health Education 200 2 

Physical Education 1 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 
3 
2 



17 



18 



Division of Business Administration 



285 



Junior Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

Business Administration 451 3 

Business Administration 305 — 

Business Education 447 3 

Business Education 576 — 

Education 400 3 

Business Administration 572 — 

Mathematics 115 3 

Mathematics 224 — 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Psychology 436 3 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



15 



Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Business Administration 450 (3) 3 

Education 560 6 (6) 

Education 500 3 (3) 

Business Education 573 3 (3) 

**Business Education 574 (0) 

Business Administration 578 (3) 3 

Business Administration 579 (3) 3 

Elective (1) 1 



12 (10) 



10 (12) 



**NOTE: Students majoring in comprehensive business education are re- 
quired to have had some office experience — six months to one year. 
Students will be given an "S" grade upon submitting letters signifying 
their business work experience from a qualified immediate supervisor in 
a firm or professional office. 

Major Programs Requirements: 

Semester 
Hours 

B.A. 305 — Principles of Management 3 

B.A. 440 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B.A. 450 — Business Communications 3 

B.A. 578 — Business Finance 3 

B.A. 572 — Electronic Data Processing for Business 3 

B.E. 331, 332— Shorthand I, II 6 

B.E. 447, 448— Transcription I, II 6 

B.E. 573— Office Procedures 3 



30 



286 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



BASIC BUSINESS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The basic business education curriculum is designed to develop students 
to teach basic business subjects at the secondary school level. The curric- 
ulum meets the certification requirements for the State of North Carolina. 
Nevertheless, each student must make the minimum score on the National 
Teachers Examination as required by the State of North Carolina to qualify 
for a Class A North Carolina teaching certificate. 

Freshman Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

*Biology 100, Physical Science 100, 

Botany 140, Zoology 160 4 

*( Select any two) 

Business Administration 304 — 

Business Education 301, 302 2 

Education 100 1 

History 100, 101 3 

17 

Sophomore Year 

Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Accounting 221, 222 3 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

Business Administration 305 3 

Psychology 320 — 

Education 300, 301 2 

Business Education 334 — 

English 250 2 

Health Education 200 2 

Physical Education 1 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 



3 

2 

3 
19 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 



1 
15 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Accounting 446 3 

Business Administration 451, 452 3 

Business Administration 440 3 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Education 400 3 

Business Education 577 — 

Mathematics 115 — 

Mathematics 224 3 

Psychology 436 — 

Business Administration 572 — 



Spring Semester 
Credit 



18 



18 



Division of Business Administration 287 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Education 500 3 (3) 

Education 560 6 (6) 

Business Administration 450 (3) 3 

Business Administration 578 (3) 3 

Business Administration 579 (3) 3 

Elective (non-business) (2) 2 



9(11) (11)9 

Major Program Requirements: 

Semester 
Hours 

Acct. 446 — Managerial Accounting 3 

B.A. 305 — Principles of Management 3 

B.A. 440 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B.A. 451, 452 — Principles of Business Law I, II 6 

Math. 224 — Elementary Statistics 3 

B.A. 572 — Electronic Data Processing for Business 3 

B.A. 450 — Business Communication 3 

B.A. 578 — Business Finance 3 

B.A. 579 — Personal Finance 3 

30 



REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS TEACHING IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

To be eligible for student teaching in both comprehensive business edu- 
cation and basic business education, the student must have met the follow- 
ing requirements: 

1. Senior standing. 

2. Completed three-fourths of the number of hours required in the basic 
business and economics courses. 

3. Completed three-fourths of the number of hours required in his 
subject matter major. 

4. Attained an average of 2.00 or better on all work undertaken in the 
University, on all professional education courses undertaken and on 
all courses undertaken in the subject matter major. 

5. Possess a personality deemed necessary for successful teaching. 

OFFICE ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 

The office administration curriculum is designed to develop personnel 
for managerial-level service roles as office executives and secretaries in 
business, professional, governmental, and industrial firms. 



288 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



Freshman Year 

Fall Semester 

Course and Number Credit 

English 100, 101 4 

Mathematics 101, 102 3 

*Biology 100, Physical Science 100, 

Botany 140, Zoology 160 4 

*( Select any two) 

Business Education 301, 302 2 

Education 100 1 

Business Administration 304 — 

History 100, 101 3 

17 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 



4 
2 

3 

3 

19 



Sophomore Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Accounting 221, 222 4 

Humanities 200, 201 3 

English 250 2 

Psychology 320 — 

Business Education 31, 332 3 

Business Education 334 2 

Mathematics 115 — 

Physical Education 1 

15 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

4 
3 



3 
3 

3 

1 

17 



Junior Year 



Fall Semester 
Course and Number Credit 

Business Administration 451, 452 3 

Business Administration 440 — 

Business Administration 305 — 

Business Education 447 3 

Economics 301, 302 3 

Health Education 200 2 

Mathematics 224 — 

Business Administration 572 3 

14 



Spring Semester 
Credit 

3 
3 
3 



3 
3 

15 



Division of Business Administration 289 

Senior Year 

Fall Semester Spring Semester 

Course and Number Credit Credit 

Business Administration 450 3 — 

Business Administration 459 — 3 

Business Administration 568 3 — 

Business Administration 569 — 3 

Business Administration 578 3 — 

Business Administration 579 — 3 

Business Education 573 3 — 

**Business Education 574 

Electives 3 5 

15 14 

**NOTE: Students majoring in office administration are required to have 
had some office experience — six months to one year. Students will be given 
an "S" grade upon submitting letters signifying their business work ex- 
perience from a qualified immediate supervisor in a firm or professional 
office. 



Major Program Requirements: 



Semester 
Hours 



B.A. 568 — Office Organization and Management 3 

B.A. 572 — Electronic Data Processing for Business 3 

B.E. 331, 332— Gregg Shorthand I, II 6 

B.E. 447, 448— Transcription I, II 6 

B.A. 305 — Principles of Management 3 

B.A. 569 — Personnel Management 3 

B.A. 450 — Business Communication 3 

B.E. 573— Office Procedures 3 

30 



COURSES IN ACCOUNTING 

Undergraduate 

221. Principles of Accounting I. Credit 4(3-3) 
(Formerly Accounting 3321) 

Introduction to the basic records and procedures used by service and 
merchandising organizations in accumulating financial data, with emphasis 
on statement presentation. Includes discussion of special problems of income 
measurement and asset valuation. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and 
B.A. 304. 

222. Principles of Accounting II. Credit 4(3-3) 
(Formerly Accounting 3322) 

Continuation of Principles of Accounting I. Emphasis on financial state- 
ment interpretation and uses of accounting data by management for plan- 
ning and control. Prerequisite: Accounting 221. 



290 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

441. Intermediate Accounting. Credit 3(3-1) 

(Formerly Accounting 3341) 

Rigorous study of the methodology and underlying theory of financial 
accounting. In-depth analysis of valuation alternatives, problems, and their 
effect on the income measurement. Prerequisite: Accounting 222. 

443. Income Tax Accounting. Credit 3(3-1) 
(Formerly Accounting 3343) 

Study of current Federal Income Tax law as they apply to individuals, 
partnerships, fiduciaries, and corporations. Prerequisite: Accounting 441. 

444. Cost Accounting. Credit 3(3-1) 

(Formerly Accounting 3344) 

Study of the principles and methodology of inventory cost determination 
and its effect on income measurement for manufacturing concerns, including 
product, process, and standard cost systems. Special attention given to uses 
of accounting data as an aid in managerial planning and control. Prerequi- 
site: 441. 

445. Advanced Accounting I. Credit 3(3-1) 
(Formerly Accounting 3342) 

Advanced financial accounting applied to partnerships, installment sales, 
consignments, fiduciaries and other specialized situations. Fundamentals of 
actuarial science. Prerequisite: Accounting 441. 

446. Managerial Accounting. Credit 3(3-1) 

Development of accounting concepts and techniques as aids to manage- 
ment, planning and control; including budgeting, cost behavior, cost- volume- 
profit analysis, and responsibility accounting. Prerequisite: Accounting 222. 

545. Advanced Accounting II. Credit 3(3-1) 

Branches and agencies; mergers and consolidations; parent and sub- 
sidiaries; pooling of interests vs. purchases; foreign exchange; fund ac- 
counting; and special advanced topics. Prerequisite: Accounting 441. 

561. Auditing Principles. Credit 3(3-1) 
(Formerly Accounting 3361) 

Concentrates on the conceptual and practical aspects of the examination 
of financial statements by independent accountants, including discussion of 
public accounting as a profession. Prerequisite: Accounting 441. 

562. Accounting Systems. Credit 3(3-1) 
(Formerly Accounting 3362) 

Focuses on current techniques of data processing with emphasis on prin- 
ciples of internal control. Prerequisite: Accounting 441. 

590. Seminar in Accounting Theory. Credit 3(3-0) 

The framework of ideas, concepts, and principles which make up the body 
of knowledge of accounting theory. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 



Division of Business Administration 291 



COURSES IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Undergraduate 

304. Introduction to Business. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3304) 

Designed to familiarize the student with the various forms of business 
organizations including their structure and operations. 

305. Principles of Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3325) 

An examination of the principles underlying the organization and man- 
agement of business enterprises. Prerequisite: Business Administration 304. 

440. Principles of Marketing. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 3340) 
Presentation of the fundamental principles, methods, and problems of 
marketing. Prerequisite or concurrent: Economics 301. 

449. Advanced Business Statistics. Credit 3(2-2) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3349) 

Business data are analyzed through use of statistical inference. Proba- 
bility, sampling, estimation are applied to economic and business problems. 
Prerequisite : Mathematics 224. 

450. Business Communication. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3350) 

Theory and practice of written communication in business, use of correct 
effective English in preparation of letters, memorandums, informal and 
formal reports. Prerequisite: Business Education 301. 

451. Principles of Business Law I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3351) 

Designed to give practical knowledge concerning the law of contracts 
agency, negotiable instruments, property, partnerships, corporations, etc. 
Prerequisite or concurrent: Economics 301. 

452. Principles of Business Law II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3352) 

Continuation of Business Administration 451. Prerequisite: Business Ad- 
ministration 451. 

454. Principles of Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3354) 

Attention is given to the principal types of insurance. Prerequisite or 
concurrent: Economics 301. 

455. Life Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3355) 

Examines the fundamentals of life insurance. Prerequisite: Business Ad- 
ministration 454. 



292 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

456. Property Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3356) 

Studies the important types of property insurance contracts. Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 454. 

457. Principles of Real Estate. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3357) 

Presents the fundamental economic aspects of real property with special 
attention given to the changing character of the urban economy and its 
effects on land values and land utilization. Prerequisite: Economics 301. 

458. Principles of Advertising. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3358) 

Consideration is given to the use of advertising and advertising media in 
the sale of goods and services. Prerequisite: Business Administration 440. 

459. Money, Credit, and Banking. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3359) 

A treatment of the principles, functions, and value of money. Emphasis 
is placed on the bank organization with special treatment of the Federal 
Reserve System. Prerequisite: Economics 301. 

470. Urban Transportation Concepts. Credit 3(3-0) 

An analysis of the role of transportation in the urban scene. Topics 
include transportation needs of the poor, analysis of the various modes of 
transportation, the demand for transportation and urban transportation 
planning methods. Prerequisites: Sophomore Classification. 

560. Health Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 3360) 
Deals with the principles, problems and coverage involved in disability 
insurance. Prerequisite: Business Administration 454. 

564. Seminar in Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3364) 

Explores problems involved in both the organizational and operative 
aspects of the business enterprise. Prerequisites: Business Administration 
305 and 569. 

565. Principles of Salesmanship. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3365) 

Provides fundamentals of structuring and managing a sales organization. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 440. 

566. Social Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3366) 

Treats the means of providing for economic and social security. Prerequi- 
site: Business Administration 454. 

567. Business Insurance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3367) 

Consideration given to the insurance program of a successful business 
enterprise. Prerequisite: Business Administration 454. 



Division of Business Administration 293 

568. Office Organization and Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3368) 

Principles and concepts of scientific office management and the responsi- 
bility of management for office services. Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 305. 

569. Personnel Organization and Management. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3369) 

Deals with problems involved in organizing, staffing, and maintaining a 
formal business organization. Prerequisite: Business Administration 305. 

570. Principles of Retailing. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3370) 

Examines the principles and practices of retailing concerns including 
organization and management. Prerequisite: Business Administration 440. 

571. Principles of Investment. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3371) 

Focuses on the fundamental types of business investments. Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 578. 

572. Electronic Data Processing for Business. Credit 3(2-2) 
Fundamentals of business data processing are treated. The facilities of 

the Computer Science Center are utilized in the course. Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 224, Accounting 441 or 446. 

575. Business Administration Internship. Credit 2(1-0) 

(Formerly Business Administration 3375) 
A field work program of observation and work in selected business firms. 
Designed to contribute materially to the total development of the student's 
educational experiences. Prerequisite: Senior Standing. 

578. Corporate Finance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3375) 

Deals with problems of financial management of the business firm in- 
cluding a determination of needs and identifying sources of funds. Pre- 
requisites: Economics 302 and Accounting 222. 

579. Personal Finance. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3379) 

Deals with the problem of money management faced by each individual 
as a consumer. Special attention is given to credit, borrowing and saving 
money, bank relationship, etc. Prerequisite: Economics 301. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

601. Government and Business. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3381) 

Treats government policies and practices affecting business. Prerequisite : 
Economics 302. 

602. International Trade. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Business Administration 3382) 

Considers the political and economic environment underlying trade prin- 
ciples applicable to international business problems. Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 440. 



294 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

610. Interdisciplinary Seminar in Urban Transportation. Credit 1-3(3-0) 
Subject geared to current developments in urban transportation. An inter- 
disciplinary course on urbanism and transportation. Prerequisite: Arvanced 
status in Business Administration, Business Education, Accounting, Eco- 
nomics, Sociology, and Architectural Engineering. 

COURSES IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Undergraduate 

301. Typewriting I. Credit 2(0-5) 
(Formerly Office Administration 3301) 

Designed to develop a working knowledge of the use of the typewriter 
toward final mastery of keyboard reaches with drills, simple problems, and 
techniques of control. Requirement: 45 gwam. 

302. Typewriting II. Credit 2(0-3) 
(Formerly Office Administration 3302) 

Emphasis on technical typewriting, tabulation reports, and other advanced 
practical applications. Requirement: 60 gwam. Prerequisite: Business Edu- 
cation 301. 

303. Typewriting III. Credit 2(0-3) 
(Formerly Office Administration 3303) 

Emphasis on intensive skill building, development of job competencies, 
office typing problems, fundamentals needed in office employment. Pre- 
requisite: Business Education 302. 

331. Gregg Shorthand I. Credit 3(3-2) 
(Formerly Office Administration 3331) 

Study of theory as outlined in Gregg Shorthand Diamond Jubilee Series. 
Requirement: 70 warn on practiced matter. Prerequisite: Business Education 
302. 

332. Gregg Shorthand II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly Office Administration 3332) 

Emphasis is placed on difficult dictation and transcription, speed tests. 
and reporting speeches. Requirement: 80 warn on new matter. Prerequisite: 
Business Education 302, 331. 

334. Business Machines. Credit 2(1-3) 

(Formerly Office Administration 3334) 
Designed to develop concepts and skill in the use of modern office equip- 
ment. Prerequisite: Business Education 302. 

447. Transcription I. Credit 3(2-1) 

(Formerly Office Administration 3347) 
Designed to review techniques and coordinate the skills of typewriting, 
shorthand, and English and promote desirable habits of performance. 
Intensive development of secretarial skill through timed dictation. Require- 
ment: The production of mailable transcripts. Prerequisite: Business Edu- 
cation 331, 332. 



Division of Business Administration 295 

448. Transcription II. Credit 3(2-1) 

(Formerly Office Administration 3348) 
Speed building emphasis and further development of skill to take dicta- 
tion and transcribe at maximum rates to satisfy the requirements of busi- 
ness. Requirement: The production of mailable transcripts. Prerequisite: 
Business Education 447. 

453. Principles of Business Education. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly Business Education 3386) 
Designed particularly for business teachers. Treats the meaning, purpose 
and scope of the business education program. Prerequisite or concurrent: 
Business Education 576 or 577. Available for undergraduate and in-service 
teachers. 

573. Office Procedures. Credit 3(2-1) 
(Formerly Office Administration 3373) 

Discuss the qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the secretary in 
the modern business office. Prerequisites: Business Education 301, 302, and 
Business Education 331, 332. 

574. Secretarial Internship. Credit 
(Formerly Office Administration 3374) 

A field work program of observation and work in selected business firms. 
Designed to contribute materially to the total development of the student's 
educational experiences. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

576. Methods of Teaching Comprehensive Business Subjects. 

(Formerly Business Education 3376) Credit 3(5-0) 

Analysis and evaluation of objectives, materials, and methods of teaching 
typewriting, shorthand, transcription, and related office skills. Provision is 
made for observation and participation in demonstration teaching. Pre- 
requisite or concurrent: Education 500, Psychology 541. 

577. Methods of Teaching Basic Business Subjects. Credit 3(5-0) 
(Formerly Business Education 3377) 

Selection, organization, and evaluation of supplementary teaching ma- 
terials and analysis of techniques in teaching bookkeeping, general business, 
business law, business structure, and elementary economics. Construction 
of teaching units, enrichment materials, and lesson plans for effective teach- 
ing on the secondary level. Prerequisite or concurrent: Education 500, 
Psychology 541. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 




THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Albert W. Spruill, Dean 

Graduate education at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University was authorized by the North Carolina State Legislature in 1939. 
The authorization provided for graduate training in agriculture, applied 
science and allied areas of study. An extension of the graduate program, 
approved by the General Assembly of North Carolina in 1957, provided for 
enlargement of the program to include teacher education, as well as such 
other programs of a professional or occupational nature as might be ap- 
proved by the State Board of Higher Education. 

OBJECTIVES OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The Graduate School of North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State 
University offers advanced study for qualified individuals who wish to im- 
prove their competence for careers in professions related to agriculture, 
applied science, education, science research, technology, the humanities and 
the social sciences. Such study of information and techniques is provided 
through courses of study leading to the Master of Science degree and 
through institutes, workshops, and individual courses designed for those 
who are not candidates for a higher degree but who desire advanced work 
in certain fields of study. Second, the Graduate School provides the founda- 
tion of knowledge and of techniques required for those who wish to continue 
their education in doctoral programs at other institutions. Third, the 
Graduate School assumes the responsibility of stimulating and encouraging 
scholarly research among students and faculty members. 

It is expected that, in the course of their studies, graduate students 

(1) will have acquired special competence in at least one field of knowledge; 

(2) will have developed further their ability to think independently and 
constructively; and (3) will have developed and demonstrated the ability 
to collect, organize, evaluate, and report facts which will enable them to 
make a contribution in their field of study. 

Degrees Granted 

The Graduate School of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University offers the Master of Science in the following fields : 

1. Agricultural Education 

2. Chemistry 

3. Education 

a. Administration and Supervision 

b. Elementary Education 

c. Guidance 

d. Secondary Education — (The student may select one of the follow- 
ing areas for certification purposes.) 

(1) Art 

(2) Biology 

(3) Chemistry 

(4) English 

(5) French 

299 



300 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

(6) History 

(7) Mathematics 

(8) Physical Education 

(9) Science for Junior High School 
(10) Social Science 

4. Food and Nutrition 

5. Industrial Arts Education 

Master of Science programs in Agricultural Education, Education, and 
Industrial Education enable students to become eligible for the following 
certificates issued by the North Carolina State Department of Public 
Instruction: 

1. Graduate Elementary Certificate 

2. Graduate Secondary Certificate 

3. Principal's Certificate 

4. School Counselor's Certificate 

5. Supervisor's Certificate 

ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY 

All applicants for graduate study must have earned a bachelor's degree 
from a four-year college. Application forms may be obtained from the 
office of the Graduate School and must be returned to that office with 
two transcripts of previous undergraduate and graduate studies. Process- 
ing of applications cannot be guaranteed unless they are received, with all 
supporting documents, in the Graduate Office at least fifteen days before 
a registration period. Applicants may be admitted to graduate studies 
unconditionally, provisionally, or as special students. 

Unconditional Admission. To qualify for unconditional admission to 
graduate studies, and applicant must have earned an over-all average of 2.6 
on a 4 point system (or 1.6 on a 3 point system) in his undergraduate 
studies. In addition, a student seeking a degree in Agricultural Education, 
Industrial Education, or Secondary Education must possess, or be qualified 
to possess, a Class A Teaching Certificate in the area in which he wishes 
to concentrate his graduate studies. A student seeking a degree with con- 
centration in Administration and Supervision, Elementary Education, or 
Guidance must possess, or be qualified to possess, a Class A Teaching Cer- 
tificate. 

Provisional Admission. An applicant may be admitted to graduate studies 
on a provisional basis if (1) he earned his baccalaureate degree from a 
non-accredited institution or (2) the record of his undergraduate prepara- 
tion reveals deficiences that can be removed near the beginning of his 
graduate study. A student admitted provisionally may be required to pass 
examinations to demonstrate his knowledge in specified areas, to take 
specified undergraduate courses to improve his background, or to demon- 
strate his competence for graduate work by earning no grades below "B" 
in his first nine hours of graduate work at this institution. 

Special Students. Students not seeking a graduate degree at A. and T. 
State University may be admitted in order to take courses for self-improve- 
ment or for renewal of teaching certificates. If a student subsequently 
wishes to pursue a degree program, he must request an evaluation of his 



The Graduate School 301 

record. The Graduate School reserves the right to refuse to accept as 
credit for a degree program hours which the candidate earned while en- 
rolled as a special student; in no circumstances may the student apply 
towards a degree program more than twelve semester hours earned as a 
special student. 

Admission to Candidacy for a Degree. Admission to graduate studies 
does not guarantee admission to candidacy for a degree. In order to be 
qualified as a candidate for a degree, a student must have a minimum 
over-all average of 3.0 in at least nine semester hours of graduate work 
at the University, must have removed all deficiencies resulting from under- 
graduate preparation, and must have passed the Qualifying Essay. Some 
departments require additional qualifying examinations. For details, see the 
Graduate School Bulletin. 

Credit Requirements. The minimum course requirements for a graduate 
degree are thirty semester hours for students in thesis programs and 
non-thesis programs. It is expected that a student can complete a program 
by studying full-time for an academic year and a summer or by studying 
full-time during four nine-week summer sessions. A graduate student 
normally carries twelve to fifteen semester hours each semester of an 
academic year. If he is teaching full-time, he may not pursue more than 
six semester hours during the academic year. During the summer he may 
not earn more than one hour of credit for each week of residence. A student 
who does not complete his degree within six successive calendar years may 
lose credit for hours earned more than six years prior to his application 
for graduation. 

Other Requirements. All students must pass a final comprehensive 
examination. 

Fees. Fees for graduate students are listed in the General Information 
section of this catalogue. 

Financial Assistantships. A limited number of assistantships are avail- 
able. These positions may require teaching, laboratory supervision, re- 
search, or general assistance to a department or to a faculty member. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL BULLETIN 

General requirements for the Master's degree, curricula, course descrip- 
tions, and other information about graduate study will be found in the 
Graduate School Bulletin, which may be obtained from the Graduate Office. 



DEPARTMENTS OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

AND AEROSPACE STUDIES 




JEPARTMENTS OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND 
AEROSPACE STUDIES 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) at A&T State University 
consists of those students enrolled for training in the Department of Mili- 
tary Science or in the Department of Aerospace Studies. These Departments 
are integral academic and administrative subdivisions of the institution. The 
Senior Officer and the Senior Air Force Officer assigned to the University 
are designated as Professor of Military Science (PMS) and Professor of 
Aerospace Studies (PAS), respectively. These senior officers are responsible 
to the Department of Defense and the institutional Coordinator of Military 
Training for conducting the training and academic programs. Army officers 
who are assigned to the University as instructors in the ROTC are desig- 
nated Assistant Professors of Military Science; Air Force officers, as 
Assistant Professors of Aerospace Studies. Noncommissioned officers of the 
Army are assigned as assistant instructors and administrative personnel. 
Noncommissioned officers of the Air Force are assigned as Specialists, 
Technicians, and Supervisors in the areas of Administration, Education, 
Personnel and Supply. 

The basic course in either the Army or the Air Force ROTC is elective 
for all physically fit male freshmen and sophomores who are not less than 
14 years of age. A student who has served at least six months of active 
duty service with any branch of the Armed Forces may receive appropriate 
credit for the freshman portion of the basic ROTC course. A student with 
one year or more of active service in the Armed Forces may receive ap- 
propriate credit for the entire basic course. He is encouraged to participate 
in one of the advanced programs to earn a commission. 



DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

Lt. Colonel William V. Graves, PMS 

The general purpose of the Army Reserve Officers Training Corps 
(ROTC) program at this institution is to procure and produce junior officers, 
who through education, attitude, and inherent qualities are suitable for con- 
tinued development as officers in the United States Army. 

OBJECTIVES 

The immediate objectives of the ROTC program are to develop in each 
participating student: 

1. Fundamentals of self-discipline, integrity and a sense of responsibility. 

2. An appreciation of the role of a participating citizen in matters deal- 
ing with the National Defense. 

3. The ability to evaluate situations, to make decisions, to understand 
people, and practice those attributes considered to be essential in a 
leader. 

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 

Programs of instruction for the Army ROTC include a four year pro- 
gram and a two year program. The four year program consists of a two 

305 



306 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

year basic course, a two year Advanced course and the Advanced ROTC 
Summer Camp. The two year program encompasses a basic ROTC Summer 
Camp, a two year Advanced course and the Advanced ROTC Summer Camp. 

Enrollment in the Advanced course is contingent upon passing the ROTC 
qualifying examinations and selection by a board consisting of military and 
civilian faculty members. 

Sophomore, junior and senior cadets participate in a "core curriculum" 
program in which they are authorized to pursue nine hours of communica- 
tions and/or enrichment courses for ROTC credit. 

Senior cadets have the option to participate in the Army ROTC Flight 
program. Participating cadets are taught to fly light aircraft at government 
expense and earn their private pilot license. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

A student may be allowed transfer credit for military training pursued 
at the service academies or institutions with ROTC units. Record of a 
student's prior military training is obtained from the institution concerned. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Students enrolled in the Advanced course are paid subsistence pay (non- 
taxable) at the rate of $50.00 per month. 

Students attending the Basic ROTC Summer Camp and the Advanced 
ROTC Summer Camp are paid at the rates established by the Secretary of 
the Army. One, two, three, and four year Army ROTC scholarships are 
available for selected students. Details on scholarships may be obtained 
from the Department of Military Science, NC A&T State University. All 
scholarship students receive $50.00 per month subsistence pay and the 
Army pay tuition, laboratory fees and book costs for these students. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE ARMY ROTC 

The Army ROTC is organized into an Army ROTC Cadet Battalion. The 
Battalion consists of a Battalion Headquarters, a Headquarters and Head- 
quarters Company and three letter companies (A, B and C). Headquarters 
and Headquarters Company consists of a band, Military Police and Drill 
Team. 

DISTINGUISHED CADETS 

The Professor of Military Science with the concurrence of the President 
of the University is authorized to designate outstanding cadets Distin- 
guished Military Students at the beginning of the senior year. These 
students are afforded the opportunity to apply for a commission in the 
Regular Army. Those students who maintain their high standing until 
graduation may be designated Distinguished Military Graduates at that 
time. 

UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT 

Uniforms, textbooks, and equipment are provided the student at govern- 
ment expense. A Uniform deposit of ten ($10.00) dollars is required of all 



Departments of Military Science and Aerospace Studies 307 

students at the time of registration. The deposit will be refunded when 
uniforms are returned. The student is responsible for the care, safeguarding, 
and cleaning of property issued to him. He is financially responsible for the 
loss, excessive wear, breakage due to carelessness, or unauthorized use of 
clothing and equipment. 

All ROTC property must be returned to the Military Property Custodian 
at the end of the school year or when the student withdraws from the 
program. 

CADET WELFARE FUND 

All Army ROTC cadets are automatically members of the Cadet Welfare 
Fund. A membership fee of $4.00 is charged payable at initial registration 
each year. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE AND ARMY ROTC 

Basic Army ROTC cadets (freshmen and sophomores) are provided draft 
deferments through the university admissions office while they are officially 
enrolled in college, also the Army ROTC department is authorized to grant 
any cadet that has completed one semester of ROTC a draft deferment. 
Advanced Army ROTC cadets are provided draft deferments by the U. S. 
Army while they are formally enrolled in the Advanced ROTC curriculum. 
Only those basic cadets selected by the Professor of Military Science will be 
issued an ROTC deferment. 

COURSES IN MILITARY SCIENCE 
FALL SEMESTER 
*101. Military Science 1A. Credit 1(1-1) 

History, organization and functioning of the ROTC and active military 
unit. An introduction to first aid, weaponry and the proper application of 
markmanship techniques. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

*102. Military Science IB. Credit 1(1-1) 

A discussion of the missions and responsibilities of the United States 
Army in National Security with emphasis on the role of the individual 
participating citizen. 

FALL SEMESTER 

*201. Military Science II A. Credit 1(1-1) 

A comprehensive survey of American Military History from the origin 
of the United States Army to the present with emphasis on the factors 
which lead to the organizational, tactical, logistical, operational, strategical, 
social and smiliar patterns found in the present day Army. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

*202. Military Science IIB. Credit 1(1-1) 

A detailed study of map reading to include aerial photographs. 



♦Leadership Laboratory is conducted from 3-5 p.m. for MS III cadets and 3-4 p.m. for 
MS I, MS II and MS IV cadets on Thursdays. 



308 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

FALL SEMESTER 

*401. Military Science IIIA. Credit 2(2-2) 

Leadership training with special emphasis on the psychological, physio- 
logical and sociological factors which affect human behavior. Military teach- 
ing principles and the role of each branch of the Army. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

*402. Military Science IIIB. Credit 2(2-2) 

Fundamentals of offensive and defensive tactics. Introduction to small 
units communication systems. Internal defense operations and Pre-Summer 
Camp Training. 

FALL SEMESTER 

*501. Military Science IVA. Credit 2(2-1) 

The relationship between the commander and his staff. Principles and 
uses of military intelligence. Duties and responsibilities of company and 
battalion officers in administrative management and logistics. The funda- 
mentals of military law. 

SPRING SEMESTER 

*502. Military Science IVB. Credit 2(2-1) 

A study on world change and military implications. The customs and 
traditions of Army Officers. A seminar on service life for officers. A study 
of the Army Division base and special type units. Branch correspondence 
courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES 

Lt. Colonel Robert 0. Thornton, Professor of Aerospace Studies 

The United States Air Force maintains a permanent Air Force Reserve 
Officers Training Corps at this institution for the purpose of conducting 
leadership training, military training, and flight training. The specific 
objective is to conduct a modern academic program keyed to the develop- 
ment of the Professional Officer. This program is offered in two divisions. 
The lower division for Freshmen and Sophomores is termed the General 
Military Course. The upper division, established as the Professional Officer 
Course is designed to continue the training of cadets as Juniors and Seniors, 
so as to provide a complete four year officer preparatory program. The 
entire Aerospace Studies curriculum is designed to commission quality 
young men and women who are not only educated in the academics of their 
university, but who have a competency in certain skills, and a strong 
motivation for active duty and an Air Force career. 

UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT 

All regularly enrolled cadets of the Air Force ROTC are furnished cost 
free, Air Force ROTC uniforms, flying clothing, equipment and textbooks. 
A deposit of ten dollars ($10.00) is required of all cadets at the time of 



♦Leadership Laboratory is conducted from 3-5 p.m. for MS III cadets and 3-4 p.m. for 
MS I, MS II and MS IV cadets on Thursdays. 



Departments of Military Science and Aerospace Studies 309 

registration as security for clothing and equipment. This fee will be re- 
funded upon return of all items issued. Each cadet is responsible for the 
maintenance and security of property issued to him. He is liable for the 
loss or abuse of this property. All property issued, must be returned at the 
end of the normal school year or upon withdrawal from school. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

Transfer credit is permitted cadets entering the Air Force ROTC, from 
another advanced ROTC program (Air Force, Army or Navy), at any 
college, university or academy. 

FINANCIAL AID 

A subsistence fee of $50.00 per month is paid advanced cadets (juniors 
and seniors) during the entire normal academic year while a member of 
the Air Force ROTC. 

Scholarships may be granted for periods of one, two, three and four 
years. Details on scholarships will be published by the Department of the 
Air Force and by the Department of Aerospace Studies, N.C. A&T State 
University. All students on scholarship receive $50.00 per month retainer 
fee, and the Air Force pays tuition, laboratory fees and book costs. 

STRUCTURE OF THE CADET GROUP 

The Air Force ROTC Cadet Group, commanded by a Cadet Colonel, con- 
sists of four Cadet Squadrons and eight Cadet Flights. Within the structure 
of this Group are such special functions as: The Security Police, the Drill 
Team and the elite Arnold Air Society. 

SPECIAL HONORS 

Outstanding performance in the Air Force ROTC Training Program, on 
the part of certain selected cadets can bestow on them the honor of 
Distinguished Cadets or Distinguished Graduate. Other honors are the Com- 
mandant's Award, the Vice-Commandant's Award, and the Air Force Times' 
Award. 

CADET WELFARE FUND 

All AFROTC Cadets are members of the Cadet Welfare Fund. A member- 
ship fee of $4.00 is charged payable at initial registration each year. 

AIR FORCE ROTC OFFICERS CLUB 

The Cadet Officers Club provides advanced cadets with an opportunity 
to demonstrate organizational leadership ability and to promote social and 
cultural activities. Each advanced (POC) cadet is requested to become a 
member of the club and is obligated to pay club dues. The amount of the 
dues will be determined by club members each school year. 

SELECTIVE SERVICE AND THE AIR FORCE ROTC 

Basic Air Force ROTC Cadets (freshmen and sophomores) are provided 
draft deferments through the University Office of the Registrar while they 



310 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

are officially enrolled in the University. Advanced Air Force ROTC Cadets 
(juniors and seniors) are provided draft deferments by the Air Force while 
they are formally enrolled in the Advanced Air Force ROTC curriculum. 

COURSES IN AEROSPACE STUDIES 
General Military Course (Basic) 

AEROSPACE STUDIES (Courses for Freshmen) 

101. U.S. Military Force in the Contemporary World I. Credit 1(1-0) 

(Formerly A.S. 7001) 
A study of the doctrine, mission, and organization of the United States 
Air Force; U.S. strategic offensive and defensive forces; their mission and 
functions; employment of nuclear weapons. 

102. Corps Training. Credit 0(0-1) 

(Formerly A.S. 7001) 
Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 101. 

103. U.S. Military Forces in the Contemporary World II. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly A.S. 7003) 

A study of aerospace defense; missile defense; U.S. general purpose and 
aerospace support forces; the mission, resources, and operation of tactical 
air forces, with special attention to limited war; review of Army, Navy, 
and Marine general purpose forces. 

104. Corps Training. Credit 0(0-1) 
(Formerly A.S. 7004) 

Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 103. 

AEROSPACE STUDIES (Courses for Sophomores) 

201. World Military Systems I. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly A.S. 7021) 

A comparative study of world military forces to include Free World 
land and naval forces, Free World air forces, Communist military systems, 
and trends in the development and employment of military power. (Fall 
Semester.) 

202. Corps Training. Credit 0(0-1) 
(Formerly A.S. 7022) 

Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 201. 

203. World Military Systems II. Credit 1(1-0) 
(Formerly A.S. 7023) (Spring Semester) 

204. Corps Training. Credit 0(0-1) 
(Formerly A.S. 7024) 

Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 203. 

Professional Officer Course (Advanced) 

401. Growth and Development of Aerospace Power I. Credit 3(3-0) 

(Formerly A.S. 7041) 
Study of communicative skills and the growth and development of aero- 
space power. The two basic subject matter areas — the development of air- 



Departments of Military Science and Aerospace Studies 311 

power and aerospace power today are critically explored. Prerequisite: 
Completion of the General Military Course or the Six-Week Field Training. 
(Fall Semester.) 

402. Corps Training. Credit 0(0-1) 
(Formerly A.S. 7042) 

Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 401. 

403. Growth and Development of Aerospace Power II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.S. 7043) 

Study of the future of manned aircraft and astronautics and space opera- 
tions. Specific inquiries are made into: types of orbits and trajectories, 
characteristics of the solar system, current and planned capabilities for 
space operations, and the operating principles, characteristics, and problems 
associated with all major components of space vehicle systems. Prerequisite: 
Completion of the General Military Course or the Six- Week Field Training. 
(Spring Semester.) 

404. Corps Training. Credit 0(0-1) 
(Formerly A.S. 7044) 

Study be taken in conjunction with A.S. 403. 

AEROSPACE STUDIES (Courses for Seniors) 

501. The Professional Officer I. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.S. 7061) 

A study of professionalism, leadership and management. Includes the 
meaning of professionalism, professional responsibilities and the Military 
Justice System. (Fall Semester.) 

502. Corps Training. Credit 0(0-1) 
(Formerly A.S. 7062) 

Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 501. 

503. The Professional Officer II. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.S. 7063) 

A study of leadership theory, functions and practices; management 
principles and functions; problem solving; and management tools, practices 
and controls. (Spring Semester.) 

504. Corps Training. Credit 0(0-1) 
(Formerly A.S. 7064) 

Must be taken in conjunction with A.S. 503. 

505. Flight Training— Ground School. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.S. 7045 & 7065) 

Academic instruction devoted to Federal Aviation Regulations, Meteo- 
rology, Navigation, Computers, and Radio Navigation. (Required for all 
Pilot Trainees and available to POC Category I-P cadets only.) 

506. Flight Training— Flying. Credit 3(3-0) 
(Formerly A.S. 7066) 

Flight instruction provided to teach the fundamentals to take offs, 
landings, stalls, steep turns, traffic patterns, air discipline, basic flight 
maneuvers, emergency procedures and cross-country flights. (Required for 
all Pilot Trainees and available to Advanced POC cadets only.) 



312 North Carolina A. and T. State University 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

PROFESSORS 

Reginald Amory Dean, School of Engineering 

B.C.E., New York University; M.C.E., Clarkson College; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic 

Institute. 

*Rudolph D. Artis Sociology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Cornell University; Ed.D., Ibid. 

Isaac Barnett Safety and Driver Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid.; Ed.D., Michigan State University. 

Arthur P. Bell Chairman, Department of Agricultural Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M. S., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., Ibid. 

Frank C. Bell History 

A.B., Indiana University; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Botros M. Botros Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, Alexandria University, United Arab Republic; M.Eng'g., Sheffield University, Eng- 
land; Ph.D., Sheffield University, England. 

Pearl G. Bradley Speech 

B.S., A. and T. College; A.M., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Naiter Chopra Chemistry 

B.S., University of Punjab; M.S., Ibid.; Ph.D., University of Dublin. 

George Cobb English 

A.B., Emory University; M.A., Ibid.; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

John O. Crawford Acting Chairman, Department of English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., State University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Colorado. 

Mabel M. Dillard English 

B.S., Ohio University; M.A., Ibid.; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Samuel J. Dunn Chairman, Department of Plant Science 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Oregon State College. 

Cecile H. Edwards Chairman, Department of Home Economics 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Ibid.; Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Donald A. Edwards Chairman, Department of Physics 

A.B., Talladega College; M.S., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

*Gerald A. Edwards Director, Division of Natural Sciences 

and Mathematics 

B.S., North Carolina College; Ph.D., University of Buffalo. 

Clara V. Evans Home Economics 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Sidney H. Evans Chairman, Department of Economics 

B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Charles A. Fountain Plant Science and Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Michigan State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Alfonso E. Gore Education 

B.S., Bluefield State College; A.M., West Virginia University; C.A.G.S., Boston University; 
Ed.D., Ibid. 

Artis P. Graves Chairman, Department of Biology 

B.S., Bluefield State College; M.S., University of Iowa; Ph.D., Ibid. 
*0n Leave. 



Officers of Instruction 313 

William Graves Professor of Military Science 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Alfred Hill Biology 

B.S., Prairie View College; M.A., Colorado A. and M. College; Ph.D., Kansas State Uni- 
versity. 

Joseph Hungate Piano 

Music B., Oberlin Conservatory of Music. 

Arthur F. Jackson Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Columbia University; Ed.D., Ibid. 

Norman E. Jarrard English 

A.B., Salem College; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., University 
of Texas. 

Samuel O. Jones Education 

B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., University of 
Oklahoma. 

Wendell P. Jones Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Iowa; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Lewis M. Knebel Sociology 

B.A., Columbia University; M.A., Ibid.; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Prances Logan Social Service 

M.Ed., Temple University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania; D.S.W., Ibid. 

Wayman B. McLaughlin History 

A.B., Virginia Union University; B.D., Andover Newton Theological School; Ph.D., Boston 
University. 

T. Mahaffey Dean, School of Administrative and 

Management Science 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.B.A., Ph.D., Ibid. 

Eugene Marrow Biology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., The Catholic University of America; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Jesse E. Marshall Guidance 

B.S., Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College; M.S., Indiana University; Ed.D., Ibid. 

Jerald M. Marteena Mechanical Engineering 

B.M.E., Ohio State University; M.S., University of Michigan. 

Roy D. Moore Chairman, Department of Health, Physical Education, 

and Recreation 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Howard T. Pearsall Chairman, Department of Music 

B.S., Fisk University; M.A., Western Reserve University; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

Robert Peck Physical Education 

B.S., Stetson University; M.A., New York University; Ed.D., Columbia University. 

Charles W. Pinckney Director, Division of Industrial Education 

and Technology 

B.S., South Carolina State College; M.S., University of Illinois; D.Ed., Pennsylvania State 
University. 

Dorothy Prince Chairman, Department of Education 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Syracuse University; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

Glenn F. Rankin - Dean of Academic Affairs, Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., Ibid. 

Waverlyn N. Rice Chairman, Department of Foreign Languages 

B.A., Morehouse College; Docteurd'Universite', University of Toulouse. 



314 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Armand Richardson Chairman, Department of Electrical Engineering 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Ibid. 

Howard Robinson Agricultural Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Randa D. Russell Physical Education 

A.B., Kentucky State College; M.S., A. and T. College; A.M., University of Michigan; 
M.P.H., University of Minnesota; Ed.D., University of Michigan. 

Gordon T. Saddler Political Science 

A.B., West Virginia State College; M.A., Ibid.; Ph.D., West Virginia University. 

Gloria R. Scott Director, Institutional Studies, Education 

A.B., Indiana University; M.A., Ibid.; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Will B. Scott Chairman, Department of Sociology and Social Service 

B.S., Indiana University; M.A., Ibid.; Ed.D., Ibid. 

A. Vishnu Sharma Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, Saugor University; D.M.I.T., Madras Institute of Technology; M.S., Oklahoma State 
University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

S. Joseph Shaw Dean, School of Education 

B.S., Fayetteville State College; M.A., North Carolina College; Ph.D., The University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Albert Smart Chairman, Department of Business Administration 

B.S., Tennessee A. and I. State University; M.B.A., Atlanta University; Ph.D., University 
of Illinois. 

Myrtle L. Smith Home Economics 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Wilbur L. Smith Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Florentine V. Sowell Chairman, Department of 

Business Education and Office Administration 

B.S., University of Nebraska; M.B.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of North 
Dakota. 

Albert W. Spruill Dean, The Graduate School, Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Iowa State University; Ed.D., Cornell University. 

John M. R. Stevenson Acting Chairman, Department of Speech 

Communication and Theater Arts 

A.B., Arkansas A. M. & N. College; M.A., University of Arkansas; Ed.D., Ibid. 

William A. Streat, Jr Chairman, Department of Architectural 

Engineering 

B.S., Hampton Institute; B.S., University of Illinois; S.M., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Virgil Stroud Director, Division of Social Sciences 

B.S., A. and T. College; A.M., New York University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Jan A. Stulinsky Architectural Engineering 

M.A., Polytechnic University; M.A., University of Capernicus; Doctor of Technical Science, 
Polytechnic University. 

Walter W. SULLPVAN Acting Chairman, Department of Chemistry 

B.S., Clark College; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Robert 0. Thornton Professor of Aerospace Studies 

B.S., Morehouse College; M.S., George Washington University. 

Claiborne Thorpe Sociology 

A.B., North Carolina College; M.A., Ibid.; Ph.D., New School. 



Officers of Instruction 315 

Richard Tucker Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.S., Oregon State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Alphonso Vick Biology 

A.B., Johnson C. Smith University; M.S., North Carolina College at Durham; A.M., Uni- 
versity of Michigan; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Marian Vick Education and Reading 

B.S., Fayetteville State College; M.A., University of Michigan; Ed.D., Duke University. 

Herbert N. Watkins Chairman, Department of Accounting 

B.S., Kentucky State College; M.B.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Alfreda Webb Biology 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute; M.S., Michigan State University; D.V.M., Tuskegee Institute. 

Burleigh C. Webb Dean, The School of Agriculture, Plant Science 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Frank H. White Acting Chairman, Department of History 

B.S., Hampton Institute; A.M., New York University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Joseph White Biology 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ibid; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Katie White Business Administration 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ibid.; Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

James A. Williams, Jr. Biology 

A.B., Talladega College; M.S., Atlanta University; Ph.D., Brown University. 

Leo Williams, Jr. Electrical Engineering 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Ibid. 

Ralph Wooden Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Naomi Wynn Dean, School of Nursing 

R.N., Hampton Institute School of Nursing; B.S., New York University; M.A., Ibid. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

J. Neil Armstrong Director of Summer School, Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; A.M., University of Michigan. 

Marion R. Blair Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Seton Hall University; Ed.D., Indiana University. 

*Mildred Bonner Psychology 

R.N., Meharry Medical College; B.S., Tennessee A. and I. State University; M.S., Ibid. 

Bolinda N. Borah Mathematics 

B.S., Cotton College, India; M.S., Oregon State University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Talmage Brewer Acting Chairman, Department of Animal Science 

B.S., Prairie View College; M.S., Michigan State University. 

Jean Bright English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Bynum C. Crews Acting Head Librarian 

A.B., Shaw University; M.L.S., North Carolina College. 

Ann L. Davis Clothing 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Columbia University. 

Charles C. Dean English 

B.S., A. and T. College; B.L.S., University of Wisconsin; M.A., New York University. 
*0n Leave. 



316 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Maria Diaz Physics 

Doctorate in Physics and Mathematics, University of Havana. 

Octavio Diaz Mathematics 

Doctorate in Mathematics and Physics, University of Havana. 

Willie T. Ellis Agricultural Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid.; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

George C. Gail Chairman, Department of Industrial Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., University of Minnesota. 

Seetha N. Ganapathy Nutrition and Research 

B.S., University of Mysore; Ph.D., University of Bombay. 

Warmoth T. Gibbs, Jr. English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

Ruth M. Gore Guidance 

B.S., Livingstone College; A.M., West Virginia University. 

Anne C. Graves Education 

B.A., Morris Brown College; M.A., University of Chicago. 

Gerard E. Gray Architectural Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Paul Gray Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Ibid.; Ph.D., Kansas State University. 

Vance E. Gray Business Administration 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.B.A., University of Chicago. 

Joseph Gruendler Mathematics 

B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Ibid. 

*B. W. Harris Chairman, Department of Adult Education and 

Community Services 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 

James Hedgebeth Acting Chairman, Department of Psychology 

and Guidance 

B.A., North Carolina College; M.A., Ibid.; Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Herbert Heughan Acting Chairman, Department of Mathematics 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Ibid. 

LeRoy F. Holmes, Jr. Chairman, Department of Art 

A.B., Howard University; A.M., Harvard University. 

Abdel-Wahab Faye H. Hussein Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Cairo University; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Calvin C. Irvin Basketball Coach, Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.A., Columbia University. 

Mahesh C. Jain Accounting 

N.D., Com. B.Com. Delhi Polytechnic; M.B.A., Atlanta University; F.S.A.A., Society of 
Incorporated Accountants and Auditors of India; Ph.D., Commercial University of India. 

Jagadish Joshi Architectural Engineering 

B.E., Gujarat University; M.E., Roorkee University; M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., 
Stanford University. 

Carrye H. Kelley English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., New York University. 

Alice E. Kidder Economics 

B.A., Swarthmore College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
•On Leave. 



Officers of Instruction 317 

Chih Hwa Li Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Chiao Tung University; M.S., University of Michigan. 

Hattye Liston Psychology 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.A., New York University; Certificate, Yale University. 

Cleo M. McCoy Director of Religious Activities, Social Studies 

B.A., Paine College; B.D., Howard University; B.S., Howard University. 

Rabinder Nath Madan Physics 

B.S., St. Stephens College; M.S., Delhi University; M.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Raymond Mallatt Economics 

B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., Ibid. 

Nan P. Manuel Mathematics 

B.S., Morgan State College; M.S., Howard University. 

Dorothy Mason Geography 

A.B., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro; M.A., University of Georgia; Ph.D., 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Eva Hamlin Miller Art 

B.F.A., Pratt Institute School of Fine Arts; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Theodore H. Partrick History 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., University of Chicago; B.D., 
Virginia Theological Seminary; S.T.M., The Graduate School of Theology, The University 
of the South; Ph.D., The University of Chicago. 

Bert C. Piggott Physical Education 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Ibid. 

Anita M. Rivers Mathematics 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., University of Michigan. 

Mary L. Roberts Business Administration 

B.S., Texas Woman's University; M.B.A., North Texas State University. 

Thomas Sandin Physics 

B.S., University of Santa Clara; M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Chung-Woon Seo Foods and Nutrition 

B.S., Korea University; M.S., Korea University. 

Larry Sherman Chemistry 

B.S., Lafayette College; M.S., Utah State University; Ph.D., University of Wyoming. 

Amarjit Singh Political Science 

B.A., Punjab University; LL.B., Delhi University; M.E.S., Claremount Graduate School; 
Ph.D., Ibid. 

Julia B. Spight Nursing 

R.N.. Hampton Institute School of Nursing; B.S., North Carolina College; M.S.N. , Catholic 
University, Washington, D. C. 

Arthur M. Stevens Chemistry 

B.S., Langston University; M.S., Michigan State University. 

Charley Thompson Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., University of South Carolina; M.E.; Ph.D., Ibid. 

Heronims Tichovskis German 

M.A., University of Latvia; Ph.D., University of Bonn. 

Arthur S. Totten Poultry 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.S., Michigan State University. 

Hari K. Varma Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., University of Roorkee; M.E., Ibid.; Ph.D., Duke University. 



318 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

John A. Weaver Chemistry 

B.S., Virginia Union University; M.S., Howard University: Ph.D., Ibid. 

Gladys H. White Director, Reading Laboratory 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Charles R. Wyrick English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Billy D. Adcock Aerospace Studies 

B.S., Central Washington College of Education. 

Stuart Ahrens Physics 

B.S., Beloitt College; M.S., University of Wyoming. 

Melvin T. Alexander Electrical Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Jimmie I. Barber Guidance 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

George Beatty, Jr. Director, Computer Science Center 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., The University of Toledo. 

Joseph Bennett Director, Thirteen College Curriculum Program 

B.A., St. Augustine's College; M.A., New York University. 

*Evans Booker Chemistry 

B.S., Saint Augustine's College; M.S., Tuskegee Institute. 

Thelma Bradford Mathematics 

A.B., Tougaloo College; M.A., Atlanta University. 

Walter F. Carlson, Jr Band Music 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.Mus., University of Michigan. 

Ethbert S. Carr Agricultural Engineering 

B.S., Ohio State University. 

Gwendolyn H. Cherry Mathematics 

B.S.. A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Elizabeth Clark Biology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

*Basil G. Coley Agricultural Economics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 

Ernestine Compton Physical Education 

B.S., Central State College; Ed.M., Temple University. 

Catherine R. Copeland English 

A.B., Shaw University; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Marquis L. Cousins Automotive Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

James F. Dawkins Building Construction Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Amar Datta Mechanical Engineering 

B.M.E., National Council on Education; M.S., Universit" of South Carolina. 

Edward R. Day Speech 

B.A., Elon College; M.A., Cornell University. 
•On Leave. 



Officers of Instruction 319 

Katie G. Dorsett Business Education 

B.S., Alcorn College; M.S., Indiana University. 

Patricia Duff Sociology 

B.S., Butler University; M.A., Indiana University. 

Dorothy M. Eller English 

B.S., Boston University; M.A., Ibid. 

Nathan Fain Mathematics 

B.S., Knoxville College; M.B.S., University of Colorado. 

Hermon Fox Architectural Engineering 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Gwendolyn Gilmore Nursing 

R.N., B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Emory University. 

William Goode Dean of Men 

B.S., Knoxville College. 

Joe E. Grier Animal Husbandry 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Melvin H. Groomes Baseball Coach, Physical Education 

B.S., Indiana University; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Ved P. Gupta Electrical Engineering 

B.Tech., Indian Institute of Technology; M.S., University of Maryland. 

Eddie Hargrove Education 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Willie C. High Mathematics 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., A. and T. College. 

David M. Hinton Mathematics 

B.S., Winston-Salem State University; M.S., DePaul University. 

Pauline Holloway English 

B.A., Allen University; Litt. M., University of Pittsburgh. 

Cennette F. Jackson Nursing 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Adelphi University. 

Junia Jenkins Nursing 

R.N., Hampton Training School for Nurses; B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Boston 
University. 

E. Bernice Johnson Home Economics Education 

B.S., North Carolina College at Durham; M.S., Ibid. 

James C. Johnson Sociology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

*Lois Kinney Speech 

B.S., Wilberforce University; M.A., Ohio State University. 

Loreno Marrow English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

*Harold E. Mazyck, Jr. Educational Counselor, Guidance 

B.S., Talladega College; M.A., New York University. 

James E. McCoy Art 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.A., Columbia University. 
♦On Leave. 



320 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Mabel M. McCoy Librarian 

A.B., Howard University; A.M., Ibid.; B.L.S., Columbia University. 

Helen McCullough Nursing 

R.N., St. Agnes School of Nursing; B.S., St. Augustine's College; M.S., A. and T. State 
University. 

Cardoza McCollum Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Thomas E. McFadden Biology 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ibid. 

Uriah McGrady Military Science 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute. 

Elridge McMillan --.-. Military Science 

B.S., South Carolina State College. 

William Mitchell Biology 

B.S., West Virginia State University; M.A., Purdue University. 

Reginald Mitchiner Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

*Eva Val Moore Home Economics Education 

B.S., West Virginia State College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Richard E. Moore Assistant Director, Public Relations, English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Columbia University. 

W. I. Morris Placement Officer, Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., New York University. 

Murray L. Neeley Track Coach, Physical Education 

B.S., Florida A. and M. University; M.A., Ohio State University. 

Alexander M. Okrah Business Administration 

A.C.C.S., University of Science and Technology; A. A. I. A., Ibid.; M.S., North Carolina 
Central University. 

Paul E. Parker Acting Chairman, Department of Mechanical 

Engineering 

B.S.M.E., A. and T. College; M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo. 

William C. Parker, Jr. . Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid.; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Thelma F, Pearsall Librarian 

B.S., West Virginia State College; B.S. in L.S., Western Reserve University; M.S., Ibid. 

Lucille Piggott Dean of Women 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Marie McGhee Pittman Librarian 

B.S.C., North Carolina College; M.S. in L.S., Atlanta University. 

Katrina Porcher Home Economics 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.A., Columbia University. 

Marguerite E. Porter English 

A.B., Allen University; M.A., Atlanta University. 

Lydia Richards Director, Child Development Center 

B.S., Knoxville College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Richard Romain English 

A.B., University of California at Berkeley; M.A., Ibid. 
•On Leave. 



Officers of Instruction 321 

Frederick Saide History 

B.A., Adelphia University; M.A., Duke University. 

Nathan Sanders Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Sarla Sharma Psychology and Guidance 

B.A., Banaras Hindu University; M.A., The University of Chicago. 

*Earnest Sherrod Electrical Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. State University; M.S., Newark College of Engineering. 

William C. Smiley Music 

B.M.E., Jackson State College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Albert E. Smith Director of The Student Union 

and Director of Athletics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., George Williams College. 

Zennis H. Smith Economics 

B.A., University of Cincinnatti; M.A., Ohio State University. 

Veda S. Stroud Business Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Donald M. Wade Aerospace Studies 

B.S., Maryland State College. 

Carrie Walden Nursing 

R.N., St. Agnes School of Nursing; B.S., Saint Augustine's College; M.A., New Yorfc 
University. 

Margaret C. Warren Nursing 

R.N., A. and T. College; B.S., Ibid.; M.S., University of Maryland. 

Katye Watson Child Development 

B.S., A. and T. College; Certificate, Elliott-Pearson Nursery School; Ed.M., Tufts Uni- 
versity. 

Andrew W. Williams Chairman, Department of 

Industrial Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Tate P. Williams Aerospace Studies 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Jimmie J. Williams Music 

B.S., Florida A. and M. University; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Forrist H. Willis Physical Education 

B.S., Johnson C. Smith University; M.A., New York University. 

James D. Wooten English 

B.A., Livingstone College; M.A., Columbia Teachers College. 

* Walter G. Wright Chemistry 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., Ibid. 

Lee A. Yates Agricultural Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Alene Coley Young Librarian 

A.B., North Carolina College; M.L.S., Ibid. 
•On Leave. 



322 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

INSTRUCTORS 

Lawrence Afesi Economics 

B.S., Bradley University; M.S., Illinois State University. 

Margaret W. Artis Mathematics 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.E., Pennsylvania State College. 

Thomas H. Avery Electrical Technology 

Certificate, Southeastern Signal Institute; B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Helen B. Banks English 

A.B., Shaw University; M.S., Columbia University. 

Francis Baird Art 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University; M.F.A., The University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro. 

Zoe P. Barbee English 

A.B., Smith College; M.A., New York University. 

Lucille A. Bell Home Economics 

B.S., Alabama A. and M. College; M.S., Howard University. 

* Brian J. Benson English 

A.B., Guilford College; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Wilhelma Bishop Music 

A.B., Knoxville College; M.M., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Lucy M. Bolden English 

B.A., Bennett College. 

Lovie Booker Chemistry 

B.S., Arkansas A. M. & N. College; M.S., Tuskegee Institute. 

Jon M. Brawner Chemistry 

B.S., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

* Sylvester Broderick, Jr French 

B.S., Otterbein College; M.A., Laval University. 

Nathan Brown Building Construction Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Sampson Buie Community Relations Specialist 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Louise Buntzman Geography 

B.A., University of South Mississippi; M.A., The University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

Dorothy Cameron Business Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

David Clark History 

B.A., Kent State University; M.A., Ohio State University. 

Truby Clayton Music 

B.S., Fort Valley State College; M.M., Northwestern University. 

Catherine N. Clifton English 

B.A., University of New Mexico; M.A., Arizona State University. 

Portia Crawford History 

A.B., Western Carolina University; M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Robert Davis Sociology 

B.A., Southern University; M.A., Atlanta University. 
*On Leave. 



Officers of Instruction 323 

Rubye T. Davis Business Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Reuben C. Drake Mathematics 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Atlanta University. 

Tiney H. Garrison Nursing 

R.N., B.S., A. and T. College. 

Hubert Gaskin Assistant Director of Registration 

and Records 

B.S., A. and T. State University; M.S., Ibid. 

Barbara S. Gold Psychology and Guidance 

A.B., Duke University; M.A., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

J. W. R. Grandy Horticulture 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Eleanor S. Gwynn Physical Education 

B.S., Tennessee A. and I. University; M.F.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Vallie W. Guthrie Physical Science 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.A., Fisk University. 

Windell Haith Business Education 

B.S., Kentucky State College; M.Ed., University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Mildred Hannon Assistant Catalog Librarian 

B.A., Bennett College; B.S., North Carolina College at Durham; M.L.S., Atlanta University. 

Valena Harris Library 

B.A.. St. Augustine's College; M.S., M.L.S., Indiana University. 

Annie Herbin English 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Curtis Higginbotham Physical Science 

B.S., North Carolina College; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Anne T. Howell Child Development 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Hornsby Howell Football Coach, Physical Education 

B.S., A. and T. State University; M.S., Ibid. 

Sarah H. James Home Management 

B.S., Virginia State College; M.S., Ibid. 

Willie Jeffries Assistant Football Coach, Education 

B.S., South Carolina State College; M.A., Ibid. 

James Jenkins Drafting Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Lucille Jewell English 

A.B., Butler University; M.S., Ibid. 

Dorothy Jones Education 

B.S., A. and T. State University; M.S., Ibid. 

Michael Kane Accounting 

B.S., Ohio State University; M.A., Ibid. 

Victor B. Karabin Physical Education 

B.S., Westchester State College; M.S., University of Illinois. 

Anwar Saeed Khan Economics 

B.A., University of the Punjab; M.A.. Ibid.; M.A., University of Wisconsin. 



324 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Harold Lanier Director of Cooperative Education 

and Related Development Activities 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Mansel P. McCleave Horticulture 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Roger McKee Associate Director, Memorial Union 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Ibid. 

Jeanne D. Mannings Physical Education 

B.S., Florida A- and M. University; M.S., Indiana University. 

Charles Massey Social Science 

A.B., Southern Polytechnic College; M.A., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

John Morris Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., A. and T. College; B.S., Johnson C. Smith University. 

Tendai Mutunhu African Afro-American Studies 

B.S., Columbia University; M.A., St. John's University. 

Forrest J. Parks Building Construction Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. State University. 

William Peeler Photography 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Sarah H. Price Assistant Reference Librarian 

A.B., Johnson C Smith University; M.S., North Carolina Central University at Durham. 

Russell Rankin Automotive Technology 

B.S., A. and T. College. 

Warren Reynolds Assistant Basketball Coach, Physical Education 

B.S., Tuskegee Institute. 

Lewis Richards Building Construction Technology 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., A. and T. College. 

Olivia Rivers Dance 

B.A., Adelphi University; M.F.A., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

James Roberts Biology 

B.S., Florida Memorial College; M.S., Atlanta University. 

Patricia Roberts French 

B.A., Spelman College; M.A., Middlebury College. 

* Lawrence Seibles Chemistry 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Kansas State University. 

Othello Shores English 

B.S., A. and T. State University; M.S., Ibid. 

Michael Simmons Economics 

B.A., Arkansas A. M. and N. College; M.A., University of Wisconsin. 

Lucille B. Smiley Assistant Serials Librarian 

A.B., Stillman College; M.A., University of Alabama. 

David P. Staples Technical Director, University Theater, 

Speech and Theater 

B.S., Ithaca College; M.S., Southern Illinois University. 

Mamie Stokes Business Administration 

B.S., Florida A. and M. University; M.B.A., Indiana University. 



'On Leave. 



Officers of Instruction 325 

John T. Thomas Assistant Catalog Librarian 

B.A., University of Travaneore; LL.B., University of Bombay; M.L.S., University of 
Western Ontario. 

Christina N. Thompson Social Science 

A.B., Knoxville College; M.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Vivian Thorpe History 

B.A., Paine College; M.S., South Carolina State College. 

Debbie Todd Sociology 

B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University. 

Grace Tucker Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington. 

Eula K. Vereen Institution Management 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Claudia Weston English 

B.S., Fayetteville State University. 

Ellen Williams Foreign Languages 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.A., Ibid. 

Iris Williams Foreign Languages 

B.A., North Carolina College; M.A., Atlanta University. 

*Jimmy Lee Williams English 

B.A., Clark College; M.A., Washington University. 

Mamie Williams Education 

B.S., Coppin State College; M.Ed., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 



FACULTY EMERITI 

Carolyn E. Crawford Home Economics 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University. 

C. R. A. Cunningham Biology 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois. 

Clarence E. Dean Agricultural Education 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S., Iowa State University. 

Wadaran L. Kennedy Animal Husbandry 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 

John C. McLaughlin Economics and Rural Sociology 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., Cornell University. 

Samuel C. Smith Industrial Education 

B.S., A. and T. College; M.S., University of Michigan. 

Juanita O. D. Tate Economics 

A.B., M.A., Howard University; Ph.D., New York University. 

Llewellyn A. Wise Business Administration 

B.S.C., New York University; M.A., Atlanta University. 



*On Leave. 



326 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

RELATED SERVICES STAFF 

Alexander, Sabina M., B.S. Library Assistant 

Allen, Monnie L., B.S Clerk, Financial Aid Office 

Arledge, Catherine, B.S. Teacher Aide, Nursery School 

Armstrong, Jacquetta, A.A Library Assistant 

Baird, Kathleen E., B.A. Dormitory Supervisor 

Baker, Annie F., R.N Staff Nurse 

Baldez, Alonzo Dormitory Supervisor 

Banks, Catherine, B.S Stenographer, Psychology & Guidance 

Banks, Phyllis, B.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Baten, James, B.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Bell, Bessie Secretary, School of Education 

Belle, Barbara, B.S. Secretary, Assistant Director Registration 

& Records 

Bennett, Kelly H., B.S. Library Assistant 

Billups, Edward L., B.S. Chief Accountant 

Bonner, Catherine T Secretary to Director of Athletics 

Bonner, George W., B.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Boone, Phillip, B.S., M.S. Assistant Dean of Men 

Bowers, Marylou H., B.S., M.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Bowles, Shelia, B.S. Stenographer, Department of Business 

Bradshaw, Kathleen, B.S. Secretary, Department of History 

Brewer, Glenna Workshop Director, Language Institute 

Brewer, Zella, B.S Stenographer, Assistant to the President 

Bridges, Nina M. Secretary to Dean, Graduate School 

Brimage, Mavis K., B.S., M.S. Assistant Dean of Women 

Brown, Emily, B.S. Stenographer, President's Office 

Brown, Kaye F. Stenographer, Student Affairs Office 

Brown, Paul E., B.S Library Assistant 

Brown, Virginia W., B.S Personnel Assistant 

Bryant, Lillian W. Stenographer, School of Engineering 

Bullock, Geneva C, B.S. Clerk, Registrar's Office 

Burgess, Barbara Stenographer, Student Activities 

Bynum, Anna, A.B. Dormitory Supervisor 

Bynum, Thomas, B.S. Athletic Trainer 

Caldwell, Annie P. Clerk, Personnel Office 

Caldwell, Carolyn, B.S. Stenographer, President's Office 

Caldwell, Julia Secretary to Supervisor of Vocational 

Academic Affairs 



327 

Camack, Jacqueline, B.S Stenographer, Army-ROTC 

Canada, Doris D., B.S Personnel Officer 

Canada, Dorothy S., B.S. Accounting Clerk, Business Office 

Caple, Faye Stenographer, Department of Health Service 

CATHEY, Brenda Typist, Registrar's Office 

Clark, Dora M. Library Assistant 

Cole, Ressie, R.N., B.S. Staff Nurse 

Cook, Carolyn, B.S. Stenographer, Public Relations Office 

Cook, Sandra Stenographer, Department of Art & Music 

Cooper, Josephine Stenographer, A V A Department 

Copeland, Dorothy R., B.S Stenographer, Office of Dean of 

Academic Affairs 

Couch, Lillian, B.S. Stenographer, Research 

Cozart, Katie, B.S. Stenographer, Extended Services 

Crawford, Albert S., B.S Laundry Manager 

Crews, Alice Secretary to Director of Summer School 

Cunningham, Cecelia J., B.S. Typist, Registrar's Office 

Curley, Estelle W., B.S. Librarian 

Dalton, Tylea, B.S Typist, Registrar's Office 

Davis, Agnes Data Processor 

Davis, Edith Accounting Clerk, Business Office 

Davis, Maxine D., B.S Purchasing Officer 

Dawkins, Virginia E., B.S Library Assistant 

Daye, Patricia Typist, Department of Home Economics 

Degraffinried, Peggy Secretary, Department of Health Services 

DeVane, Alicia, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Dilligard, Linda, B.S Stenographer, Student Financial Aid Office 

Donaldson, Dianna Stenographer, Department of Economics 

Donnell, Brinda Clerk, Registrar's Office 

Drake, Carrie Stenographer, Planning & Development 

Dyson, Gloria Key Punch Operator, Computer Science 

Edwards, Bernice M Accounting Clerk, Business Office 

Evans, Margaret L., B.S Payroll Clerk, Business Office 

Everette, Dorothy E., B.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Fogle, Stella Clerk, Business Office 

Foster, Annie G., B.S Secretary to Dean of Academic Affairs 

Fuller, Gwendolyn, B.S Secretary, Dean of Administration 

Garfield, James E., B.S., M.S Director Auxiliary Services 

Gill, Joyce, B.S Stenographer, Department of Political Science 



328 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Goldston, Henry, B.S. Chemist 

Graeber, Marvin B., B.S., M.S. Superintendent, Building & Grounds 

Graham, Lauretta Clerk, Library 

Grandison, Louise, B.S. Secretary to Director of Planning & 

Development 

Grandy, Ruth D., B.S. Secretary, Department of Agricultural 

Education 

Gray, Josephine A Typist, Library 

Griffin, John B. Police Chief 

Harper, Carrie W., B.S Assistant Director of Financial Aid Office 

Harris, Frances, B.S Stenographer, Academic Research 

Harris, Wylie, B.S. Residence Hall Director 

Harrison, Vivian Switchboard Operator 

Hawkins, Hurlyn Stenographer, Curriculum Development 

Haynes, Mary C. Typist, Registrar's Office 

Headen, Arthur, B.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Hill, Patricia, B.S Clerk, Bursar's Office 

Hill, William Technician 

Hines, Genevieve Stenographer, Plant Science 

Hobson, Delores Typist, Registrar's Office 

Howard, Edna, B.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Howell, Clifton, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Hudgens, Eula, B.S. Library Assistant 

Irvin, Kathryn, B.S Stenographer, Biology Department 

IveY, Oliver, B.S. Assistant Property Custodian 

Jacobs, Stanley Dormitory Supervisor 

Jarrell, Katherine Security Guard, Library 

Jefferson, Zenobia, B.S. Secretary to the Director, Testing & 

Counseling 

Jeffries, Gladys, B.S. Typist, Office of Admissions 

Jeffries, Mary, B.S Program Co-Ordinator Student Memorial Union 

Jenkins, Olive, B.S Secretary, Department of Home Economics 

Johnson, DeOla Accounting Clerk, Business Office 

Johnson, Harvey, B.S., M.S Superintendent of Farm 

Jones, Bertha Teacher Aide, Nursery School 

Jones, Evelyn G., B.S., M.S Research Associate, Home Economics 

Jones, Evelyn Q Dormitory Supervisor 

Jones, Louise D., B.S Secretary, School of Nursing 

Jones, Ruby W., B.S. Administrative Officer, Business Office 



329 

Kamara, Moses, B.S., M.S Counselor, Testing & Counseling 

Kee, Lokie, Jr., B.S. Admissions Counselor 

Kimber, Odessa Typist, Building & Grounds 

Leacraft, Paul, B.S. Technician 

Lee, Valmarie Clerk, Library 

Lightford, Dorothy S., B.S Typist, Library 

Logan, Marion T., B.S Typist, Office of Admissions 

Marks, Mary K. Dormitory Supervisor 

Mason, Edith Stenographer, Drama & Foreign Language 

Matier, Mae C, B.S Library Assistant 

Maxwell, Patsy Key Punch Operator, Computer Science 

Mitchell, Christine Dormitory Supervisor 

Moore, Rudy V Operator, Duplicating Shop 

Morris, Cynthia Stenographer, Sociology Research 

Murray, Danniette Stenographer, Placement Office 

McCoy, Ernest A., B.A., M.S Residence Hall Director 

McKee, Hilda P Library Assistant 

McKee, Roger N., B.S., M.S Assistant Director, Student Union & 

Co-Ordinator Of Intramurals 

McKee, Virginia D., B.S Secretary to the President 

McKOY, Luvater Dormitory Supervisor 

McLaughlin, Pauline, B.S Secretary to the Dean of Student Affairs 

McLendon, Sitrena G Stenographer, Mathematics Department 

McMillian, Jacqueline, B.S. Stenographer, Public Relations 

Meachem, James, B.S Manager, Bookstore 

Nash, Madeline H Library Assistant 

Nash, Mae H., B.S Secretary to the Dean, School of Agriculture 

Neal, Joyce G., B.S Stenographer, School of Engineering 

Neal, Mary G., R.N Staff Nurse 

Neal, T. E., B.S. Superintendent, Power Plant 

Nelson, James C, B.S Computer Programmer, Computer Science 

Nesbitt, Myrtle L., B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Owens, Carol J Clerk, Business Office 

Page, Doris D., B.S Stenographer, Physical Education 

Parker, Katrina, B.S Clerk, Student Memorial Union 

Patterson, Jewell Stenographer, Black Studies Grant 

Pederson, Lucy, B.S. Secretary, Curriculum Development Program 

Pennix, Norma C, B.S Stenographer, Air Force ROTC 

Pickett, Jessie, B.S. Stenographer, Sociology Grant 



330 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Pinckney, Melvin, B.A Dormitory Supervisor 

Pettiford, Callie Dormitory Supervisor 

Poole, Correne A., B.S Secretary to Librarian 

Posey, Patricia A Stenographer, Education Department 

Price, Barbara Typist, Registrar's Office 

Price, Margaret G., B.S. Secretary to Director of Research 

Purnell, Ernestine K., B.S. Secretary to the Dean of Men 

Quick, Josephine Library Assistant 

Raleigh, Eva, B.S Army ROTC-Military Personnel Specialist 

Secretary 

Raleigh, Juanita, B.S Secretary, Computer Science 

Reid, Rubye M., B.S. Stenographer, Department of Industrial 

Education & Technology 

Riddick, Audrey, B.S. Clerk, Financial Aid Office 

Robinson, Gloria Stenographer, School of Arts & Science 

Salter, Gillie R., R.N Staff Nurse 

Sanders, Thomas Dormitory Supervisor 

Savage, Brenda Stenographer, Planning & Development 

Sessoms, Gail Stenographer, Bookstore 

Shedd, Hilda, B.S Secretary, Economic Research 

Shelton, Christine, B.S. Secretary to the Business Manager 

Shepard, Edgar, B.S. Administrative, Bursar's Office 

Simmons, Margaret, B.S Cashier, Bursar's Office 

Simpson, Annie R Dormitory Supervisor 

Sims, Geraldine, B.S. Accounting Clerk, Bursar's Office 

Slade, Barbara, A. A. Typist, Testing & Counseling 

Smith, Bertha H., B.S Secretary to Director of the Division of 

Industrial Education and Technology 

Smith, Fannie, B.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Smith, J. Clinton, R.N., B.S. Staff Nurse 

Smith, Jonah, B.S. Bursar 

Smith, Mary D., B.S. Dormitory Supervisor 

Smith, Sadie, B.S. Stenographer, English Department 

Spencer, Yvonne, R.N Staff Nurse 

Stafford, Florine I., B.S Library Assistant 

Strayhorn, Gwendolyn, B.S. Clerk, Business Office 

Stringer, Betty Stenographer, Associate Dean of Student Affairs 

Swann, Gloria, B.S. Secretary to Dean, School of Arts & Science 

Suggs, Jannette, B.S. Secretary, Division of Business 

Taylor, Evelyn Clerk, Building & Grounds 



331 

Terry, Betty Data Processor, Computer Science 

Thompson, Allie L., B.S Stenographer, Library 

Thompson, Mary L., B.S Library Assistant 

Tillman, Mae, B.S Dormitory Supervisor 

Vines, Thelma, R.N., B.S. Supervisor of Nurses 

Walker, Daisy, B.S Stenographer, Education Department 

Wallace, Ethel, B.S. Stenographer, Upward Bound 

Wallace, Latham, B.S Assistant Property Custodian 

Wallington, Annie, B.S. Secretary, Chemistry Department 

Watlington, Carolyn, B.S Typist, Business Office 

Watlington, Marva L., A.B Dormitory Supervisor 

Watkins, Tampra, B.S Clerk, Library 

Watson, Lena Stenographer, Physics Department 

White, James I Dormitory Supervisor 

White, Joan Stenographer, Department of English 

White, Marjorie H Secretary to Director of Institutional Studies 

Whitelow, Onnie, B.S Stenographer, School of Nursing 

Williams, Dorothy Dormitory Supervisor 

Williams, Marilyn, B.S Stenographer, Graduate School 

Williams, Raymond P Technician 

Williams, Robert A., B.S Assistant Property Custodian 

Williamson, Curtis Dormitory Supervisor 

Wilson, Zollie Assistant Farm Supervisor 

Wooden, Rosalie Secretary, Extended Education Department 

Woodson, Linda Accounting Clerk, Bursar's Office 

Wooten, Marteena, B.S., M.S. Secretary to Dean of Women 

Wright, James, A.B. Counselor, Testing & Counseling 

Zachary, Katie, B.S. Library Assistant 

Zeigler, John, B.S Business Manager 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THE 
UNITED STATES ARMY ADMINISTRATION 

Levin U. Ashby, Staff Sergeant Chief Administration Clerk 

Franklin C. Gunnoe, Staff Sergeant Supply Sergeant 

John C. Johnson, Sergeant First Class Principal Instructor 

Hubert F. Sutton, Sergeant Major Chief Instructor 

Charlie Willis, Jr., Sergeant First Class Principal Drill Instructor 



332 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS OF THE 
UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION 

Isroe C. Cooper, Jr., Technical Sergeant Sergeant Major 

Hughes S. Hobson, Technical Sergeant . NCOIC Detachment Personnel 

Frank Brinson, Staff Sergeant NCOIC Education and Training 

Herbert R. Shears, Staff Sergeant NCOIC Cadet Records 

STATE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE PERSONNEL 

R. E. Jones Assistant Director 

L. R. Johnson District Agricultural Agent 

J. A. Spaulding District Agricultural Agent 

Mrs. Helen W. Branford District Home Economics Agent 

Mrs. Josephine W. Patterson District Home Economics Agent 

W. C. Cooper U-H Club Specialist 

T. W. Flowers Horticulture Specialist 

Mrs. Genevieve K. Greenlee Housing and House 

Furnishings Specialist 

S. J. Hodges Agronomy Specialist 

Mrs. Bessie B. Ramseur Foods and Nutrition Specialist 

Mrs. Roberta Bruton Secretary, Assistant Director 

Mrs. Carolyn Corbett Secretary, District Home Economics Agents 

MRS. Joyce Douglas Secretary, Agricultural Specialists 

Mrs. Linda Graves Secretary, 4-H Club Specialist 

Mrs. Carolyn Mitchell Secretary, Home Economics Specialists 

Miss Adra Richardson Secretary, District Agricultural Agents 



GRADUATES 




DEGREES CONFERRED MAY 31, 1970 

RANKING STUDENTS 

With Highest Honor Louella Jane Mclntyre 

With Highest Honor Elbert Ray Murphy 

With Highest Honor Kenneth Wendell Stith 

With High Honor Walter Monroe Alexander, Jr. 

With High Honor Linda Cockerham Brown 

With High Honor Bettye C. Burton 

With High Honor Mark Donald Campbell 

With High Honor Marcia D. Dawson 

With High Honor Leslie Morris Dula 

With High Honor Bonnie Mae Floyd 

With High Honor Ronald G. Gadsden 

With High Honor Thurman Bruce Hampton 

With High Honor Priscilla Harper 

With High Honor James T. Isler 

With High Honor Charles Edward Joyner 

With High Honor Wilhelmenia Lewis 

With High Honor Momodou S. K. Manneh 

With High Honor Lillie R. Miller 

With High Honor John W. Quick 

With High Honor Joseph Leroy Richardson 

With High Honor Jervie Scott 

With High Honor Betty C. Sherrod 

With High Honor Merlene Smith 

With High Honor Ora Lee Strickland 

With High Honor Pauline Hickerson Turner 

With High Honor Sandra A. Washington 

With High Honor Pauline Welborn 

With High Honor Carroll Williams 

With High Honor Delores Ann Young 

With Honor Glenda Lucille Alston 

With Honor Artie Andrew Amos 

With Honor Joe Louis Anderson 

With Honor Avonne Lomoine Bailey 

With Honor La Verne Margaret Bass 

With Honor Paul V. Best 

With Honor Anthony W. Bryant 

With Honor Juanita Faye Bush 

With Honor Gloria Cornelis Byers 

With Honor Conferlete Carney 

With Honor Clarence 0. Clarke 

With Honor Merle F. Code 

With Honor David C. Collins 

With Honor James Donell Cooper 

With Honor Mary Elizabeth Crisp 

With Honor Almedia K. T. Dasher 

With Honor Garland Gregory Gill 

With Honor Douglas L. Faulkner 

With Honor William Hampton, Jr. 

With Honor Betty Harris 

With Honor Patricia L. Hopkins 

With Honor Joyce Marie Hughes 

335 



336 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

With Honor Anthony Korva Jallah 

With Honor Willie G. Manning 

With Honor Joyce M. Mebane 

With Honor James Lee Melvin 

With Honor Norma Jean Mitchell 

With Honor Mildred M. Moore 

With Honor Ronald Virgil Reed 

With Honor Janice Gilyard Robinson 

With Honor Jeanne L. Rudd 

With Honor David Bernard Smith 

With Honor Rosetta Pearl Smoot 

With Honor William Edward Stevens, Jr. 

With Honor Juanita Beatrice Turner 

With Honor Gordon Eugene Watson 

With Honor James Edward Wright 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

MAY 31, 1970 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY (DRAFTING) 

Dollie F. Sykes 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONICS) 

Alfred A. Schenck 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS 

Edward H. Chavis, Jr. Russell Harris, III 

John L. Drumgoole Clifton D. James 

Robert S. Hamilton James L. Peele 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Charlie Barnes, Jr. fjoseph L. Richardson 
Carnell M. Evans Perry E. Roberts 

James J. Keith Clifford C. Somerville 

William B. McMillian Scott G. Toweh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 

William L. Bowman Harvey I. Mack 

Wendell B. Fenner David L. Smith 

Frankie T. Jones Jerry V. Stimpson 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGY 

James P. Chapman 



•Cum Laude 
tMagna Cum Laude 
tSumma Cum Laude 



Graduates 337 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING 

Irvin M. Hodge Margaret Rozzelle 

Alfred L. McDaniel Arthur M. Price, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ART (DESIGN) 

Calvin E. Ashburg f Charles E. Joyner 

Willie Bailey Donnie A. Moore 

Joe L. Black Eugene O'Neal 

Haywood P. Dunlap, Jr. Pompey E. Stafford 

Tyus S. Few, Jr. Lawrence B. Wright, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ART EDUCATION 

William E. Guy, Jr. Lawrence E. Price 

Julia Jones Fredrick A. Roberts 
* James L. Melvin 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY 

Eddie G. Blanchard Eugene Maddox, Jr. 

Keith A. Brown Wilbur W. Malloy 

Helena W. Burrowes Charles W. Stephens 

Ca-Sondra F. Ceaser Calvin C. Matthews 

Shelia L. Cherry Shirrell L. Moore 

Joehester Diggs Antoinette T. Morris 

Dora J. Farrior Odena M. Pugh 

Jean E. Greene Reginald D. Ray 

Harvey A. Jones Harry S. Spellman 

Eva G. McKoy Van Dell Tindall 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY EDUCATION 

Edna L. Barnes Melvin C. Mason 

Gwyned M. Davis * Joyce M. Mebane 

Thomas E. Holloway Vera B. Price 

Hazel A. Jones Norwood Randolph 

Barbara A. Lacewell Randolph Sessoms 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING 

Terry Armstrong Sheldon W. Hawkins 

Edward D. Artis Jimmy N. Hill 

Ronnie A. Bell *Joyce M. Hughes 

Percy A. Everson, Jr. *Anthony K. Jallah 

Archie B. Ford Archie M. James 

Mack D. Foster, Jr. Terry Jeffries 

Johnnie Fuller, Jr. f Wilhelmenia Lewis 

Ray V. Fullwood Carl F. Metz 

Roger W. Haith Mildred L. Milliken 

George M. Harbison Eddie Mims 



♦Cum Laude 
tMagna Cum Laude 
tSumma Cum Laude 



338 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



JElbert R. Murphy 
William Pemberton 
James A. Peterson 
Andrae Richmond 

{Kenneth W. Stith 



f Sandra A. Washington 
Larry J. Watkins 
Walter Woodard, Jr. 
Charles J. Worth 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Cheville B. Blackwell 
Thomas E. Blue, Jr. 
Carlton J. Boujai, Jr. 
Reginald Brown, Jr. 
Vera L. Brown 
Gloria V. Burris 
Rosa M. Carter 
John L. Chambers, Jr. 
Harold N. Clark 
Anthony O. Cone 
Claryce V. Counts 
Franklin H. Cummings 
Edward G. Dixon, Jr. 
Eunice B. Douglas 
Donald J. Earle 
Dianne D'ette Edgerton 
John W. Fletcher 
Garry E. Ford 
James E. Fuller 
Herman E. Fulton 
Shelton W. Glenn 
Jimmie Goins 
Hubert C. Graves 
Thomas S. Harris 
Eugene T. Harrison 
Eugene L. Hicks 
Maelene J. Hines 
Curtis L. Hoggard 
Walter R. Holt 
Carolyn H. Hunt 
Calvin M. Kelly 



Richard A. Kirk 
Jacqueline Macklin 
Hilda Mainer 
Dannie M. Marshall 
Rickey J. Mills, Jr. 
Alma L. Moon 
Brenda S. Morgan 
Cynthia F. Morris 
Reginald M. Morton 
Gail McCrimmon 
Daniel McGill, Jr. 
Harvey S. McKoy, Jr. 
Jacqueline C. McMillan 
Charles D. Parker 
Harold Perry 
John A. Petty 
Douglas W. Pierce 
Nann P. Pride 
Stanley J. Regan 
Alfred M. Richards 
Leon I. Roberts, Jr. 

* Jeanne L. Rudd 
James H. Smallwood 

*David B. Smith 

*William E. Stevens, Jr. 
Rufus Washington, Jr. 

*Gordon E. Watson 
Richard E. Wilson 
Patricia A. Wortham 

* James E. Wright 
George C. Young 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION (Basic) 



Carolyn P. Adkinson 
Harold Anderson 
Barbara A. Belle 
Aljuana Curry 



Dora J. Dickens 
Jessie James, Jr. 
Annie D. Staley 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION (Comprehensive) 



Brenda L. Adams 
Rebecca Addington 
Mollie A. Bethea 
Shelia L. Bowles 



fBettye C. Burton 
*Gloria C. Byers 
Barbara J. Campbell 
Rosa M. Carter 



♦Cum Laude 
tMagna Cum Laude 
ISumma Cum Laude 



Graduates 339 

Patricia A. Chalmers Barbara A. Johnson 

Alfredia Faison Joan T. Johnson 

fBonnie M. Floyd Sherrion D. Macklin 

Barbara A. Foster *Norma J. Mitchell 

Janice M. Gay Jessie L. Pickett 

Elizabeth L. Harrell Edith P. Stamps 

Nina R. Ingram Mary P. Thomas 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

f Linda C. Brown *Douglas L. Faulkner 

Astley S. E. Burrowes Albert Whitaker, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ECONOMICS 

* Artie A. Amos Samuel L. Leary 
*Joe L. Anderson Tom A. Lewis 

Johnnie B. Bailey Vicky D. McClettie 

Billy G. Barrett Thomas J. Mitchell 

Nelson S. Brockenborough Waymon Moody 

Victor B. Carr Thomas J. Reid, Jr. 

Thaddis R. Cates Barbara J. Smith 

* James D. Cooper Herman M. Smith 
Moses Douglass, Jr. Kenneth F. Thompson 
Evelyn A. Gadson Margaret L. Vincent 
Harold B. Glover Glenda B. Watkins 
Henry A. Hamler, Jr. Willie A. Whittington 
Mattie R. Hood Levi Williams 
Gwendolyn M. Hughes Joseph F. Wyatt 
Morris Kimble 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Thermon R. Bradsher Plato McCollum, Jr. 

Wilbert L. Camm, Jr. Robert N. Wallace 

Samuel Harrison Darryl M. Washington 

Thomas Johnson David W. Washington 

Louis S. Jones 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS 

f Walter M. Alexander, Jr. John W. Scales, Jr. 

Bennie R. Brooks Cora Nichols Scurlock 

f Ronald Gadsden James W. Witherspoon, III 

George Holloway, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS 

*Clarence 0. Clark Vincent L. Godette 

Dwight Davis James E. Jones, Jr. 

Willie A. Funderburk 



♦Cum Laude 
tMagna Cum Laude 
tSumma Cum Laude 



340 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH 

*Juanita F. Bush Lois B. Parker 

Ila Joyce Cannady Kicky Reed 

Lovie Louise Cannon Faye B. Robinson 

Arlanders Hunter Leola Sloss 

f Lillie R. Miller Vynetta H. Sturdivant 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH EDUCATION 

*Anthony W. Bryant Gwendolyn Lawson 

Gloria E. Buck Christine L. Lyles 

Lillian P. Campbell Jasper E. Woods 

fMark D. Campbell Patricia McAllister 

Georgia 0. Gaylor Cornelia L. Schoolfield 

*Priscilla Harper James H. Simms, Jr. 

*Betty Harris Judy P. Williams 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FRENCH EDUCATION 

Joyce M. Fields *William M. Hampton, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HISTORY 

David L. Brower Arthur Totten 

Marcellous Cooper Kermit N. Waddell 

Betty G. Council Cathey M. Wall 

Minnie O. Dupree f Carroll Williams 

Gloria Y. Jones Cynthia P. Willie 

Anne L. Mitchell James F. Willie 
Joseph A. Raines, III 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HISTORY EDUCATION 

James J. Battle, Jr. Ronald P. Harris 

Albert P. Blackmore Thomas Hilliard, III 

John L. Brown John T. Lumpkins 

Janie E. Clark Tony W. Penn 

Jessie E. Cox fJohn W. Quick 

Pete Nelson Cromartie Thaddeus C. Smith, Jr. 

Janie P. Dominique William A. Wyche, Jr. 
Justine D. Ford 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS WITH MAJOR IN: 
CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

Jo- Ann Cowan Shirley M. Moore 

Addie C. Exum Carolyn Price 

Hazel L. Gainey fBetty C. Sherrod 
Clara E. Humphrey Joyce J. Weatherspoon 

Paulette F. Jackson Judy C. Wilson 



*Cum Laude 
tMagna Cum Laude 
tSumma Cum Laude 



Graduates 



341 



CLOTHING, TEXTILES, AND RELATED ARTS 



*Avonne L. Bailey 
Rose M. Bullock 
Barbara A. Epps 
Dorothy E. Everett 
Carolyn Hines 
Jacqueline Jackson 



Marie Jeter 
Eleanor R. Lawrence 
Joyce F. Pridgen 
Betty G. Smith 
*Juanita B. Turner 
Cynthia A. Womack 



*Glenda L. Alston 
Barbara A. Andrews 
Rodenia S. Backmon 
Emma V. Bell 
Harriet D. Brandon 
Marcia J. Britton 
Brenda J. Cagle 
Carolyn 0. Caldwell 

f Marcia D. Dawson 
Agnes L. Hairston 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

May B. Hairston 
Avis M. Hill 
Julia M. Jordan 
Sandra Gray Johnson 
Doris A. Littlejohn 
Sharron B. McCray 
Rosa M. Siler 
fMaelene Smith 
Nell C. Turner 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 



Felton C. Brown 
George W. Frazier, Jr. 
John F. Haywood, Jr. 



Calvin Moore 
Kenneth E. Page 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 



George W. Brown, Jr. 
Walter N. Brown 
*Merl F. Code 
Herbert Foreman 
Rodger Hill 



Tony L. Mitchell 
*Mildred M. Moore 
*Rosetta P. Smoot 

Gladys L. Streater 



Kenneth E. Clinton 
Walter L. Hawkins 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

*Ronald V. Reed 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 



* La Verne M. Bass 
Paula J. Banks 

*Paul V. Best 
Michael V. Daniels 
Clarence L. Fisher 



Thomas D. Hager 
Julius C. Hairston 
William G. Thompson 
Michael C. Wallace, Jr. 



♦Cum Laude 
tMagna Cum Laude 
tSumma Cum Laude 



342 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 



Jacquelyn B. Anderson 
Esther E. Barbee 
Patricia A. Boykin 
Josette M. Calloway 
Elfreda R. Daniels 
Peggy J. Davis 
Gloria D. Evans 
Vivian V. Evans 
Marnique C. Foster 
Queen D. Foy 
Evergerlene D. Gilmore 
Bettie L. Graham 
Katherine L. Hatcher 
James W. Holeman 
*Patricia L. Hopkins 
Wilma L. Howard 
Jacqueline M. Hunter 



Barbara A. Kelley 
Mary E. King 
Veronica E. Knott 
Lizzie L. Lilly 
Inez Perry 
Nancy C. Price 
Brendal J. Randall 

* Janice G. Robinson 
Martha T. Robinson 
Karen V. Scipio 
Frostenia M. Smith 

fOra L. Strickland 
Lillie Vanlue 
Linda M. Watson 
Angeles Webb 

fPauline Welborn 

fDelores A. Young 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 



Lossie L. Boomer 
Gracie B. Bradford 
Nannie K. Doggett 



Everett Gary 
Claudette Napier 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Freddy L. Baker 
C. Howard Bigelow 
James A. Carroll 
Larry Crowder 
♦Almedia K. T. Dasher 
Karie E. Davis 
Lawrence L. Dunn 
Albert Eubanks 
Paul F. Faulkner 
Aona F. Harrington 
Charles E. Huff, Jr. 
Kenneth Johnson 



Johnny Joyner, Jr. 
Conrad W. Lattimore 
Charlie B. Lewis 
Albert W. Mills 
Robert D. Nelson 
Nathan R. Pettus 
Eleanor R. Reese 
Geralene Thorne 
E. Cynthia Turner 
Curtis Williamson 
Wilmeth S. Wilson 
Tampra R. Watkins 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Ella L. Butler 
Betty G. Council 
Malcolm L. Debnam 
Reginald N. Dowdy 
David A. Fashion, Jr. 
Nelson L. Gaskill 
Keith A. Graves 
fThurman B. Hampton 
Gregory P. Haskins 
Malcolm K. Howard 



Rebecca A. Jackson 

David C. Jones 

Wesley J. Lee 

Curtis Link, Jr. 

Melvin C. McLawshorn 
fMomodou S. K. Manneh 
fWillie G. Manning 

Howard W. McMillan 

Lawrence C. McSwain 

Nancy Di-Anne Owens 



•Cum Laude 
tMagna Cum Laude 
JSumma Cum Laude 



Graduates 



343 



Clarence W. Page 
Leonard J. Phelps, Jr. 
Treasa A. Stanley 



Rheubin M. Taylor 
Jesse M. Thomas, Jr. 
Robert I. Williams, Jr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY 



William F. Clark 
Estell L. Collins 
Horace G. Ferguson, Jr. 
John W. Hood 



Matthew D. Jarmond, Jr. 
JLouella J. Mclntyre 
Gerald L. Terrell 
Charlie W. Woodard 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SOCIAL SERVICE 



Lawrence A. Bass 
Brenda L. Cloud 
Thelma A. Colvin 
Marilyn M. Corbett 
*Mary E. Crisp 
Delcine Townes Elliott 
Rachel A. Fox 
Claudia Grant 
Joe A. Herbert 
Patricia A. Hill 



Patricia A. Johnson 
Elizabeth B. Lewis 
James M. Liles 
Vivian M. Martin 
Paulette R. Merritt 
Walter L. Rodgers 
Pamela A. Tillman 
fPauline Hickerson Turner 
Lola M. Walton 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SOCIOLOGY 



William H. Adams 
Stephen W. Anderson 
Rebecca Bailey 
Ola E. Berger 
James K. Bryant 
Richard L. Carter 
Barbara J. Clair 
Bernice V. Cleveland 
Juanita Deans 
Phillip W. DeBerry 
Clara J. Douthit 
Willis R. Foster 
Lewis E. Gallant 
Mary P. Gladden 
Shirley A. Gripper 
Brooks E. Hester 
Rodger Hudson 
Hazelene Hush 
fJames T. Isler 
Theodore Jackson 
George H. Johnson, Jr. 
Turner L. Johnson 



Joyce F. Jones 
Brenda J. Letman 
Alice V. Lowe 
Jacqueline Martin 
Frank Meachem 
Linda G. Mooney 
Linda W. Moran 
Lucy M. Ramsey 
John C. Reid 
Jo-Ann J. Robinson 
Wilbert L. Royal 
Shirley J. Shearod 
Margaret Shivers 
Shirley A. Smith 
Wilbert C. Spruill 
Jacqueline G. Stevenson 
Charles T. Thomas 
Debbie E. Todd 
Cheryl L. Wesley 
Dwight W. Whitted 
Bobby L. Williamson 



•Cum Laude 
tMagna Cum Laude 
tSumma Cum Laude 



344 North Carolina A. and T. State University 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SOCIAL STUDIES 

Margaret L. Alexander Cornell T. Jones 

Larry W. Ashe James H. Jones 

Doris J. Bingham Wanda P. Miller 

Nancy B. Fryar f Jervie Scott 
Virginia C. Fryar Cloyce J. Spinks 

Doris M. Hardy Daniel L. Troxler 

Kathleen Hillman Mary Yvonne Weeks 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SOCIAL WELFARE 

John D. White 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
(AUTOMOTIVE) 

Nevador Evans 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

(DRAFTING) 

George L. Alford Kenneth W. Jamison 

fLeslie M. Dula Plummer Vines, Jr. 

Billy R. Hutton 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
(ELECTRONICS) 

*Garland Gregory Gill William Howard Courtney 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONICS) 

*Conferlete Carney Wesley R. Perry 

Garland A. Ferebee Alfred A. Schenck 

James R. Hill Calvin A. Wilson 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY (MECHANICAL) 

Edward L. Bailey *David C. Collins 



*Cum Laude 
tMagna Cum Laude 
tSumma Cum Laude 



Graduates 345 

DEGREES CONFERRED 
MAY 31, 1969-70 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

Quincy Bledsoe, B.S., Prairie View College 1963 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

William Roberts, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University 1961 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Administration-Education 

Fred McKinley Brim, B.S., Bluefield State College 1959 

Allen Braxton Nichols, B.A., Benedict College 1951 

Willie Robert Rogers, B.S., Benedict College 1957 

Ralph Rucker Tatum, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University 1958 

Gene Carroll Turner, B.S., Maryland State College 1957 

George Wylie, Jr., B.S., Winston-Salem State University 1961 

Biology-Education 

Kennon Bland, B.S., St. Paul's College 1961 

Rather G. Brown, B.S., Alabama A. and M. College 1959 

Joseph B. Crawford, B.S., Alabama A. and M. College 1956 

Stanley M. Edwards, B.S., Livingstone College 1961 

Charles Edward Fells, B.S., Alcorn A. and M. College 1963 

Jerold Frei, A.B., Augustana College 1961 

Freeman Gause, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University 1956 

Ralph Bernard Hall, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University 1962 

Josephine Hobbs Heughan, B.S., Bennett College 1950 

Elwood Johnson, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University 1952 

Wayne J. Metheny, B.S., Pennsylvania State University 1963 

Carolyn Russell Newsome, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State 

University 1965 

Theodora Streater Parker, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State 

University 1958 

Kenneth Peterson, B.A., University of Wichita 1960 

Julia Pearlean Ricks, B.S., North Carolina Central University 1963 

Bennie J. Woodard, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University 1960 



346 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

Chemistry-Education 

Raymond John Brice, B.S., Ferris State College 1960 

Dorothy Jean Harris, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State University . 1964 

Peter Holmes Hopkins, B.S., Randolph-Macon College 1951 

David Leslie Hunter, B.A., Wartburg College 1961 

Edward Louis Jones, B.S., Alabama A. and M. College 1956 

Elementary-Education 

Theodora Cordery Beatty, B.S., Morgan State College 1968 

Earline Moore Curry, B.A., Bennett College 1954 

Elease Seawright Earle, B.S., Allen University 1954 

James Nelson Freeman, B.S., Winston- Salem State University 1955 

Gwendolyn Tisdale Gerald, B.A., Benedict College 1964 

Robert Lee Knight, B.S., Elizabeth City State University 1961 

Ericsteen Jefferson Lash, B.S., Winston-Salem State University 1965 

Robert Jeffrey McBryde, B.S., Fayetteville State University 1958 

Zeola McGill, B.S., Winston-Salem State University 1952 

Alex Purcell, B.S., Fayetteville State University 1958 

Rosalyn L. Smith, B.S., D. C. Teacher's College 1969 

English-Education 

Joyce Lucille Davis, B.S., South Carolina State College 1965 

Grace Marbury Harris, A.B., Talladega College 1958 

Mamie Louise Hoskins, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State 

University 1949 

Myrtle Elizabeth Howard, B.S., Alabama A. and M. College 1968 

Vivian Earline Joyner, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State 

University 1968 

Barbara Jean Woods, B.A., Bennett College 1967 

French-Education 

Joyce Annette McCullom, B.A., Livingstone College 1965 

Addie Thomas Perry, B.A., Benedict College 1950 

Guidance-Education 

Luna Byrd, A.B., Shaw University 1959 

Dorothy Curry Oglesby, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State 

University 1963 

Doris Alf ord Strode, A.B., Shaw University 1964 



Graduates 347 

History-Education 

James Handy Boykin, A.B., Shaw University 1947 

Benjamin Franklin Clark, A.B., North Carolina Central University ... 1955 

Martha Ellen Hunter, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State 
University 1961 

Jacqueline Hunter Jenkins, B.A., Bennett College 1968 

Robert Gordon Reynolds, B.A., Claflin College 1955 

MATHEMATICS-EDUCATION 

Jerome Alfred Murphy, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State 

University 1965 

Social Studies-Education 

George Lenward Brightharp, B.S., North Carolina A. and T. State 

University 1967 

Sallie Bell Cook, B.A., Stillman College 1960 

James William Greene, B.A., St. Augustine's College 1948 

Winifred Anderson Lykes, B.A., Bennett College 1955 

DOCTOR OF HUMANE LETTERS 

Robert Joe Brown Jesse Louis Jackson 

DOCTOR OF LAWS 

Robert Haines Frazier 

REGULAR ARMY APPOINTMENT AND BRANCH 
Cadets Commissioned January 28, 1 970 

*James K. Bryant, Transportation Corps 
*James F. Willie, Transportation Corps 

Cadets Commissioned May 31, 1970 

*Carlton J. Boujai, Medical Service Corps 

*David L. Brower, Infantry 
*Anthony O. Cone, Quartermaster Corps 

*James D. Cooper, Signal Corps 

* William B. McMillian, Field Artillery 

* Warren O'Brien, Infantry 

*Reginald D. Ray, Medical Service Corps 

*Peter R. Wubbenhorst, Adjutant General Corps 

*Howard W. McMillan, Adjutant General Corps 

♦Distinguished Military Graduates 



348 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE APPOINTMENT AND BRANCH 
Cadets Commissioned May 31, 1970 

Artie A. Amos, Armor 

Joe L. Anderson, Adjutant General Corps 

Terry Armstrong, Field Artillery 

Harold N. Clark, Infantry 

David C. Collins, Ordnance Corps 

Marcellous Cooper, Jr., Military Intelligence 

Edward G. Dixon, Armor 

Hubert C. Graves, Infantry 

Keith A. Graves, Infantry 

Thurman B. Hampton, Armor 

Malcolm K. Howard, Military Intelligence 

David C. Jones, Infantry 

Harvey A. Jones, Medical Service (Carrier) 

Robert E. Lewis, Corps of Engineers 

James A. Peterson, Field Artillery 

Joseph A. Raines, Field Artillery 

David B. Smith, Military Police 

Herman M. Smith, Infantry 

Preston E. Taylor, Medical Service Corps 

James E. Wright, Finance Corps 

COMMISSIONED AS SECOND LIEUTENANTS IN THE 
UNITED STATES AIR FORCE 

Cadets Commissioned January 28, 1970 

George W. Brown, Jr., Pilot 

Jesse C. Dove, Pilot 

George W. Foxworth, Pilot 

George M. Harbison, Accounting -Finance Officer 

James E. Jones, Jr., Dentist 

Calvin C. Matthews, Cardiologist 

Thomas J. Reid, Jr., Missile Officer 

Curtis E. Spencer, Education-Training Officer 

Rufus Washington, Jr., Personnel Officer 

Joseph E. Wyatt, Pilot 

Cadets Commissioned May 31, 1970 

Bennie R. Brooks, Space System Analyst 

Clarence 0. Clark, Physicist 

Malcolm L. Debnam, Personnel Officer 

Moses Douglas, Jr., Data Automation Officer 

Leslie M. Dula, Education Training Officer 



349 



Frankie T. Jones, Veterinarian 

Mack D. Foster, Jr., Accounting-Finance Officer 

Eddie R. Mims, Jr., Pilot 

*Tony L. Mitchell, Mathematician 

Ronald V. Reed, Pilot 

*William E. Stevens, Pilot 

Kenneth W. Stith, Accounting-Finance Officer 

Levi Williams, Pilot 

COMMISSIONED AS SECOND LIEUTENANTS IN THE UNITED STATES ARMY 
UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE APPOINTMENT AND BRANCH 

Cadet Commissioned July 18, 1969 

Brian P. Jackson, Armor 

Cadet Commissioned August 6, 1969 

Robert Conner, III, Infantry 

Cadet Commissioned October 24, 1 969 

Arlanders Hunter, Jr., Field Artillery 

Cadets Commissioned January 28, 1970 

Victor B. Carr, Armor 

Clarence Fisher, Military Intelligence 

Clarence W. Paige, Military Intelligence 

Alfred Schenck, Signal Corps 

Jerry V. Stimpson, Infantry 

Michael C. Wallace, Armor 

Darryl M. Washington, Ordnance Corps 



'Distinguished Graduates 



350 North Carolina A. and T. State University 



PRIZES AND AWARDS 

The Hamilton Gold Watch presented by Hamilton Watch Company to the 
graduate who has most successfully combined proficiency in his major field 
of study with notable achievements in the Social Science and Humanities. 

Ronald Gadsden 

The Merrick Medal Award to the graduating senior for all-round ex- 
cellence in Industrial Arts. 

Felton C. Brown 

The Saslow's Incorporated, Medal Award to the graduating senior with 
the best record in the Social Sciences. 

Carroll Williams 

The Saslow's Incorporated, Medal Award to the graduating senior with 
the best record in the School of Arts and Sciences. 

Linda Cockerham Brown 

The L. Richardson Memorial Hospital Auxiliary Award to the most 
promising graduating senior in the School of Nursing. 

Ora Lee Strickland 

The Florence Nightingale Award given by The Women's Auxiliary to 
the Greensboro Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical Society to the most 
promising junior in the School of Nursing. 

Emanuella Quick 

The Elihue A. Barden Award to the Mechanical Engineering student in 
the junior class, maintaining the highest scholastic average and who ex- 
emplifies high moral character. This award was established by his widow. 

Donald G. Pierce 

The ROTC Certificate of Meritorious Leadership Achievement is awarded 
to the Distinguished Military Graduate who most clearly displays the 
greatest leadership potential of any of his contemporaries. 

Reginal D. Ray 

Gordon Memorial Scholarship Award is presented to the most promising 
ROTC Military Science II Cadet. 

William L. Johnson, Biology 

"The Kappa Delta Pi Scholarship" in Education. 
Jannette Diane Bell Sylvia Johnson 



Prizes and Awards 351 

The Band Awards for Four Years of Meritorious Service in the University 
Band. 

La Verne Bass Nancy Owens 

Julius Hairston Van Tindall 

Three Years of Meritorious Service in the University Choir. 

Joseph Allen Lindell Mills 

Donald Bynum Carolyn Mosley 

Yvonne Cooper Dorothy Moye 

Audrey Harris Barbara Pierce 

Annette Kitchen Donald Thompson 
Stephanie Williams 

Four Years of Meritorious Service in the University Choir. 

Paula Banks Tony Mitchell 

Claudia Foster James Weston 

Thomas Hager 

Four Years of Meritorious Service in the A. & T. State University Male 
Singers. 

Thomas Hager James Weston 

Three Years of Meritorious Service in the A. & T. State University Male 
Singers. 

Audrey Harris Donald Thompson 

Winners of the Andrew Rhodes Medal. 

LaVerne Bass Paul V. Best 

Certificates of Merit for service in the James B. Dudley Chapter of the 
Student National Education Association. 

Edna Barnes Bonnie M. Floyd 

Gloria Buck Jervie Scott Petty 

Gate City Chapter Scholastic Award for the graduating high school senior 
in the Gate City area. 

Sharon Graves 

Gate City Athletic Scholarship Award to the athlete from the Gate City 
area. 

John Guy 

The A. & T. State University ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AWARD for 
outstanding service with Future Alumni Activities Committee 1967-1970. 

Brenda Cloud 

The A. & T. State University ALUMNI ASSOCIATION AWARD for 
outstanding service with Future Alumni Activities Committee 1968-1970. 

Harold Glover 



352 North Carolina A. and T. State University 



GRADUATING SENIORS HOLDING MEMBERSHIPS 

IN HONOR SOCIETIES 

ALPHA KAPPA MU HONOR SOCIETY 

Joe Louis Anderson Eddie Mims 

Paul V. Best Mildred Marie Moore 

Gloria Byers Cornelia Louise Schoolfield 

Leslie Morris Dula Ora Lea Strickland 

Bonnie Floyd Pauline H. Turner 

Ronald Gadsden Sandra Washington 
Lillie R. Miller 

KAPPA DELTA PI HONOR SOCIETY IN EDUCATION 

James Battle Joyce Marie Mebane 

LaVerne M. Bass Tony Mitchell 

Paul Vernon Best Jervie Scott Petty 

Gloria Cornelia Byers Merlene Tapp Smith 

Leslie M. Dula Rosetta Pearl Smoot 

Bonnie M. Floyd Mattie L. Summers 

Priscilla Harper Mary Yvonne Weeks 

PI OMEGA NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Gloria Byers Alfredia Faison 

Patricia Chalmers Bonnie Floyd 

SIGMA RHO SIGMA RECOGNITION SOCIETY FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE MAJORS 

James Battle Thurmond Hampton 

Oscar Beale Wilbur Royal 

Rachel Fox Ruben Taylor 

Phillip Deberry Kermit Waddell 



ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES IN NORTH CAROLINA 

1969-70 

Alamance 52 Cherokee 2 

Anson 11 Chowan 8 

Beaufort 31 Cleveland 29 

Bertie 15 Columbus 41 

Bladen 19 Craven 33 

Brunswick 14 Cumberland 74 

Buncombe 31 Currituck 1 

Burke 7 Dare 2 

Cabarrus 23 Davidson 20 

Caldwell 11 Davie 9 

Camden 5 Duplin 30 

Carteret 22 Durham 65 

Caswell 24 Edgecombe 53 

Catawba 13 Forsyth 147 

Chatham 30 Franklin 14 



Enrollment 



353 



Gaston 23 

Gates 8 

Graham 1 

Granville 19 

Greene 12 

GUILFORD 617 

Halifax 39 

Harnett 20 

Haywood 9 

Henderson 2 

Hertford 27 

Hoke 23 

Hyde 8 

Iredell 20 

Johnston 20 

Jones 18 

Lee 15 

Lenoir 36 

Lincoln 8 

McDowell 1 

Martin 22 

Mecklenburg 94 

Montgomery 10 

Moore 13 

Nash 40 

New Hanover 32 

Northampton 38 

Onslow 20 

Orange 23 

Pamlico 9 



Pasquotank 10 

Pender 17 

Perquimans 15 

Person 16 

Pitt 76 

Polk 1 

Randolph 22 

Richmond 26 

Robeson 46 

Rockingham 78 

Rowan 24 

Rutherford 9 

Sampson 40 

Scotland 30 

Stanly 4 

Stokes 15 

Surry 10 

Swain 1 

Tyrrell 11 

Union 10 

Vance 24 

Wake 100 

Warren 25 

Washington 14 

Wayne 41 

Wilkes 5 

Wilson 35 

Yadkin 3 

TOTAL 2771 



ENROLLMENT BY STATES 
1969-70 



Alabama 11 

California 1 

Colorado 1 

Connecticut 25 

Delaware 5 

District of Columbia 71 

Florida 40 

Georgia 44 

Illinois 4 

Indiana 3 

Kansas 1 

Louisiana 1 

Maryland 13 

Massachusetts 3 

Michigan 9 

Minnesota 1 

Mississippi 4 

New Jersey 67 

New York 89 

NORTH CAROLINA 2771 



Ohio 15 

Oklahoma 1 

Pennsylvania 57 

Rhode Island 4 

South Carolina 180 

South Dakota 1 

Tennessee S 

Utah 1 

Virginia 260 

Washington 1 

West Virginia 1 

Wisconsin 10 

FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

Africa 7 

India 5 

Iran 1 

West Indies 3 

TOTAL 3714 



354 North Carolina A. and T. State University 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 
1969-70 

Senior Class 941 Special Students 27 

Junior Class 682 Graduate Students 222 

Sophomore Class 955 

Freshman Class 887 TOTAL 3714 

Total Enrollment, Excluding duplicates, Regular Session 1969-70 3714 

Summer Session, Undergraduates, 1970 1276 

Summer Session, Graduate Students, 1970 616 



GRAND TOTAL 1969-70 5606 



Index 



355 



INDEX 



A 

Accounting 280 

Administration, Officers of ix 

Admission 19 

Admission, Conditional 20 

Admission Procedure 19 

Admission Procedure, New Students 19 

Admission Requirements 20 

Admission to Graduate Study 300 

Aerospace Studies 305 

Agricultural Business 156 

Agricultural Education, Dept. of ... . 33 

Agricultural Science 62 

Agricultural Technology 37 

Agriculture, School of 31 

Animal Science 37 

Architectural Engineering, Dept. of 250 

Art, Dept. of 73 

Audio-Visual Center, The 6 

Auditors 8 

Auto Mechanics 242 

Automotive Technology 237 

Awards 350 

B 

Bacteriology 122 

Biology, Dept. of 118 

Biological Science 118 

Board of Education viii 

Board of Higher Education viii 

Board of Trustees viii 

Botany 122 

Business Administration 282 

Business Education 284 

C 

Calendar, University vi 

Changes in Schedules 25 

Changing Schools 25 

Chemistry 127 

Class Attendance 27 

Classification of Students 23 

Clothing, Textiles and Related Art . . 47 

Computer Science Center 6 

Course Repeat Rule 26 

Credentials, Filing of 21 

Crop, Soil and Earth Sciences 61 

D 

Dairy Science 41 

Degrees 28 

Degree and Graduation 

Requirements 28 

Driver Education 234 

E 

Economics 155 

Education 189 

Education, Dept. of 192 

Education, Business 284 

Education, Special 189 

Electrical Engineering 256 

Engineering, Agricultural 63 

Engineering, Architectural 250 

Engineering, Electrical 256 

Engineering, Mechanical 259 

Engineering, Physics 147 

Engineering, School of 249 

English, Dept. of 80 

Enrollment 352 

Entrance Units 20 

Examinations, Semester 24 

Expenses, General 8 



F 

Failures 25 

Fees, Summer School 9 

Fees, Veterans 10 

Financial Information 7 

Food Administration 51 

Food Services 15 

Food & Nutrition 48 

Foreign Languages, Dept. of 89 

Fraternities 16 

French 89 

G 

General Expense 8 

General Science 123 

Geography 174 

German 95 

Grades, Failures 25 

Grading System 24 

Graduate School, The 299 

Graduates 335 

Graduation Requirements 26 

Graduation with Honors 27 

Guidance 208 

Guidance Services 13 

H 

Health 212 

Health Services 13 

Historical Statement 3 

History 165 

Home Economics, Dept. of 44 

Home Economics Education 52 

Honor Roll 26 

Honor Societies 352 

Honors, Graduation with 27 

Horticulture 66 

Housing .... 14 

Humanities 72 

I 

Industrial Arts 227 

Industrial Education 227 

Industrial Education, Dept. of 227 

Industrial Education, Vocational 229 

Industrial Technology, Dept. of 237 

Institution Management 51 

Institutional Memberships 5 

Instruction, Officers of 312 

Intramural Athletics 16 

L 

Language and Composition 85 

Library 6 

Literature 86 

Loan Fund, Student 7 

Loan Program, National 

Defense Student 7 

Location 4 

M 

Mathematics 135 

Mechanical Engineering 259 

Memberships, Institutional 5 

Memorial Union 16 

Military Science 305 

Music, Applied 103 

Music, Dept. of 96 

Music Education 102 

Music, Literature 102 



356 



North Carolina A. and T. State University 



n 

National Defense Student 

Loan Program 7 

Nursing, School of 273 



Officers of Administration ix 

Officers of Instruction 312 

Out-of-State Student 21 

Organizations and Activities, 

Student 16 

P 

Payment of Fees, Veterans 10 

Payments-tuition-dates of 8 

Physical Education 212 

Physical Education, Dept. of 

Health and 212 

Physical Plant 4 

Physical Science 129 

Physics 144 

Physics, Engineering 147 

Placement Services 15 

Plant Science and Technology, 

Dept. of 61 

Political Science 175 

Poultry Husbandry 43 

Prizes and Awards 350 

Psychology 206 

Q 

Qualification as Proof of Residency 21 



Reading, Developmental 85 

Re-admission of Former Students . 21 

Recreation 223 

Refunds 9 

Registration 23 

Rehabilitation Corp. Student Loan 

Prog., N. C. Rural 8 

Related Services Staff 326 

Religious Organizations & 

Activities 16 

Reserve Officers Training Corps 305 

Russian 93 



Schedule, Changes in 25 

Scholastic Requirements 24 

Schools, Changing (within College) . 25 
Secondary School Teachers, 

Education of 189 

Social Service 185 

Sociology 181 

Sororities 16 

Spanish 94 

Special Education 189 

Special Fees and Deposits 8 

Special Students 20 

Speech Communication and 

Theater Arts 105 

Student Government 16 

Student Load and Scholastic 

Standards 24 

Student Loan Fund 7 

Student Organizations & Activities . . 16 

Student Personnel Services 13 

Students, Classification of 23 

Students, Special 20 

Students, Transfer 20 

Students, Visiting 21 

Summer School Fees 9 



Teacher Education Admission and 

Retention Standards 191 

Teacher Education, the Program of . 189 

Transfer Students 20 

Trustees, Board of viii 

Tuition Fees and Charges for Regular 

Session Nine Months Term 8 

V 

Veterans 15 

Veterans, Fees of 10 



W 

Withdrawal from College 25 

X, Y, Z 

Zoology 123